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Improvise Adapt Overcome!
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Do you study a martial art? If so how do you bring your training out of the class,or ring, and into the relm of the real world?
 

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Well Dragon, in the real world one repeating firearm, can take out a whole lot of ninjas. But, honestly I prefer to avoid violence at all costs, to me violence is really detrimental to survival. So, I prepare by being low-key and keeping the machoness to a minimum.

In this day and age, most people don't want to fight. They are much more willing to shoot, than get into a kung fu fight. So, use martial arts to stay fit, and aware, and calm. But, if you really want to prepare get firearm training
 

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Food Storage Solutions
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Well Dragon, in the real world one repeating firearm, can take out a whole lot of ninjas. But, honestly I prefer to avoid violence at all costs, to me violence is really detrimental to survival. So, I prepare by being low-key and keeping the machoness to a minimum.

In this day and age, most people don't want to fight. They are much more willing to shoot, than get into a kung fu fight. So, use martial arts to stay fit, and aware, and calm. But, if you really want to prepare get firearm training

I agree to a certain extent but i myself have studied and practiced Kenpo for roughly 9 years now and it has saved my life on more than a few instances......think of it this way:

In my experiences, its easier to disarm someone of a weapon than it is for someone to try to shoot you while they are half in-coherent on the ground. Speed and agility are key
 

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Preparing for violence is just like preparing for anything else. You want to cover all your bases. This means armed/unarmed self defense training, staying in good shape, understanding certain aspects of psychology, and being willing to let your ego take a hit to avoid violence.

I have guns and my concealed carry permit, and I also train in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu / submission grappling. One aspect of jiu jitsu that I think is very handy (besides its proven effectiveness) is the ability to control or incapacitate someone without harming them at all.

Guns are great, but you don't want your only two choices to be do nothing, or kill.
 

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Skills with firearms, knives, hand to hand, should ALL be in your toolbox.

We've taught some very EASY pistol takeaways at campouts here in the Southeast before. It's always nice to see a 90 lb. female or child take a gun away from a 250 lb. guy! :D:

Ground fighting should be a priority of learning IMO. 90% of all fights end up on the ground. When weapons are involved, it gets REAL tricky.

Lowdown3
 

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Improvise Adapt Overcome!
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Discussion Starter #6
Preparing for violence is just like preparing for anything else. You want to cover all your bases. This means armed/unarmed self defense training, staying in good shape, understanding certain aspects of psychology, and being willing to let your ego take a hit to avoid violence.

I have guns and my concealed carry permit, and I also train in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu / submission grappling. One aspect of jiu jitsu that I think is very handy (besides its proven effectiveness) is the ability to control or incapacitate someone without harming them at all.

Guns are great, but you don't want your only two choices to be do nothing, or kill.
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I tend to agree with this. Especially since the courts would not look to kindly on shooting someone, especially if you are in a "No Gun" zone.

Aside from my Kung fu, I also cross train in a knife fighting system. I think you are more likely to be faced with a knife attack, than a gun. I see plenty of people with a folder in thier right pocket, but rarely do I see someone with a gun today.

When you think about it, ultimately it was a small knife that took down the twin towers, not a gun.
 

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I've had both armed and unarmed self defense training. My rapidly advancing years are, however, taking away my agility and speed. In an unarmed confrontation my goal is to escape and my training is geared to that end. I also usually carry pepper spray. I would hate to have to use my gun against an unarmed attacker, but we older folks sometimes have fewer options then you younger folks.
 

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Improvise Adapt Overcome!
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Yes,Pepperspray is a great thing. It's considered a defensive weapon, so the very fact that you had to use it makes the attacker look more guilty.

I should probably sell it on my Ebay store.
 

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Skills with firearms, knives, hand to hand, should ALL be in your toolbox.

We've taught some very EASY pistol takeaways at campouts here in the Southeast before. It's always nice to see a 90 lb. female or child take a gun away from a 250 lb. guy! :D:

Ground fighting should be a priority of learning IMO. 90% of all fights end up on the ground. When weapons are involved, it gets REAL tricky.

Lowdown3
Check my post above :) Brazilian Jiu Jitsu for the win!
 

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American fearmaker
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Ever since I graduated from high school many years ago, I take at least one training course of some sort, every year, involving hand-to-hand fighting or some form of firearms training. The course may run a week, a couple of days or even a couple of weeks depending on where I go and what I practice. About twice a month I go to a range and practice my marksmanship with a couple of different guns of mine. I study tactics in between, play chess or checkers, read up on different firearms or tactics from magazines or books and I watch different videos of krav maga, shooting techniques and so on. Then I plan ahead...

When I plan ahead, I try to plan to avoid confrontations or fights. If, however, I do find it necessary to fight, I already know exactly what, when and how I will do things. Every now and again I review my tentative plans looking for weaknesses in them. I update my fighting gear as technology advances. I plan several scenarios too.

Sometimes I plan to fight alone. At night. With and without light. I plan to fight for an extended battle and short ones. I plan to use different firearms and sometimes just one firearm. I plan to fight alongside my sons and/or wife. I plan to fight for me, my family and my neighbors should it be needed.

Know what a prepared range card is? I do and I use them for where I live. I don't normally sleep deep and I do a lot of dozing or light sleeping. Old habits from my military days are still with me. When I go out, enter a business or bank I ALWAYS scan before entering a building and frequently check my surroundings. I know if a car is out of place in my home neighborhood. If something doesn't look right, sound right or smell right, I walk away. I use caution to my advantage, not paranoia. Look ahead and glance behind you on occasions. Forethought is my ally.
 

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I am currently taking a basic karate class and learning to shoot. I spent 6 years working with violent teen boys (most of them bigger and stronger than myself). Those jobs were all in wilderness settings and i was mostly left on my own with 6 or so boys for the majority of the day and frequently had to defend myself or one of the other boys and often went up against more than one boy at a time. I had to take a LOT of training in each of these jobs and learned a LOT of techniques for defending myself and others... mostly this training was about disabling the kid in question w/o harming him... however, being one of the very very few women working in that field (at least around here) I was also taught what NOT to do; basically I was taught all the dirty stuff that CAN cause serious and even permanent damage and then pointedly told "Never do this." It was pretty clear that this was all about making sure I could handle myself but keeping the program from being sued if I hurt someone using an illegal restraint or offensive maneuver.

The most important things that I learned during that 6 years were:

1: Be willing to act. If you aren't willing to do what's necessary, knowing how to do it doesn't matter and won't help.

2: Never hesitate, act and act fast, don't sit around thinking about it and trying to decide the best way to approach it. Jump into the fray fast and let your body do what it's been trained to do. Your subconscious knows what needs to be done and will take over and do it!

Any up close and personal situation is far more worrisome than one where you have the distance that affords you the luxury to shoot instead of punch or kick. I'd rather shoot a bad guy who's 75 feet away than pounce on one who's right in my face any day.
 

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Improvise Adapt Overcome!
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Discussion Starter #13
The concern I have with BJJ is it does not take into account knife play. Most of what I have seen of it leaves you far too open and fails to protect vital areas from being cut.

In an empty hand situation, once the fight is on the ground, it's really good stuff. of course everyone has gotten good at defending against takedown attempts now a days, so your stand up game has to be much more developed.

The issue I see the most, is stand up guys tend to neglect thier ground fighting and take down skills, and ground fighters tend to neglect thier stand up skills.

Also, in the real world, I prefer the Kung fu methods for ground fighting because it keeps you standing and mobile in case of multiple attackers.

Of course, BJJ has proven superior once you are down on your back, so it's am important component to many people's training.
 

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Improvise Adapt Overcome!
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Discussion Starter #14
Ever since I graduated from high school many years ago, I take at least one training course of some sort, every year, involving hand-to-hand fighting or some form of firearms training. The course may run a week, a couple of days or even a couple of weeks depending on where I go and what I practice. About twice a month I go to a range and practice my marksmanship with a couple of different guns of mine. I study tactics in between, play chess or checkers, read up on different firearms or tactics from magazines or books and I watch different videos of krav maga, shooting techniques and so on. Then I plan ahead...

When I plan ahead, I try to plan to avoid confrontations or fights. If, however, I do find it necessary to fight, I already know exactly what, when and how I will do things. Every now and again I review my tentative plans looking for weaknesses in them. I update my fighting gear as technology advances. I plan several scenarios too.

Sometimes I plan to fight alone. At night. With and without light. I plan to fight for an extended battle and short ones. I plan to use different firearms and sometimes just one firearm. I plan to fight alongside my sons and/or wife. I plan to fight for me, my family and my neighbors should it be needed.

Know what a prepared range card is? I do and I use them for where I live. I don't normally sleep deep and I do a lot of dozing or light sleeping. Old habits from my military days are still with me. When I go out, enter a business or bank I ALWAYS scan before entering a building and frequently check my surroundings. I know if a car is out of place in my home neighborhood. If something doesn't look right, sound right or smell right, I walk away. I use caution to my advantage, not paranoia. Look ahead and glance behind you on occasions. Forethought is my ally.
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What you are talking about is situational awareness. That is a whole different ball game, BUT a very important and intertwined thing at the same time.

I have to admit I tend to neglect this area of my practice. I should probably put more focus on it.
 

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For you gun guys....how do you plan to get to your gun when someone is on you instantly? You can't see everything around you all the time. Even the gun guys need empty hand skills to be able to get to your gun.
 

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I for one always back down and then come back when I am ready........why take a chance when you can win for sure?..... I'd rather loose face than to loose my face.
 

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awake and aware
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I take an Mixed Martial Arts class.
I don't have the time to study them individually which would get you better in each one and then you combine them in one class.
I lift weights also.
I also carry guns too.
Be prepared and do yourself a favor and learn how to grapple really well.
 

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Know what a prepared range card is? I do and I use them for where I live. I don't normally sleep deep and I do a lot of dozing or light sleeping. Old habits from my military days are still with me. When I go out, enter a business or bank I ALWAYS scan before entering a building and frequently check my surroundings. I know if a car is out of place in my home neighborhood. If something doesn't look right, sound right or smell right, I walk away. I use caution to my advantage, not paranoia. Look ahead and glance behind you on occasions. Forethought is my ally.
I just wish I had a few crew-served weapons to go with them :)

I don't have any pre-made range cards simply because I don't have any specific firing positions in or around my Apt. The concept of knowing your fields of fire still applies though (including distances, areas of cover and concealment, avenues of approach, etc).
 

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For you gun guys....how do you plan to get to your gun when someone is on you instantly? You can't see everything around you all the time. Even the gun guys need empty hand skills to be able to get to your gun.
Look up Krav maga and some of the street-oriented grappling material out there. There is some good stuff that emphasizes techniques for police and military to be able to access and use their weapons if in a grappling situation.
 

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Improvise Adapt Overcome!
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Discussion Starter #20
Look up Krav maga and some of the street-oriented grappling material out there. There is some good stuff that emphasizes techniques for police and military to be able to access and use their weapons if in a grappling situation.
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We have a lot of great stuff in the Kuntao system I study. This is especially true with the knife fighting.

I also really like the way it handles the ground problems. The Monkey branch especially, is really good for this.

They key reason i enjoy it is the entire system is done with the mindset that the attacker has a weapon, and will gut you if possible. It really causes you to tighten up your game to a substantial degree. The training mindset even spills over to your emptyhand skills, and it improves the tolerances there too.
 
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