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Notice the title, it says how do "you" break in a new rifle?

I have heard of people using a bore brush after every round until they get 20+ rounds through the rifle.

Some people will not get the barrel hot the first day out with the rifle. They will fire a few rounds, let the rifle cool off, fire a few rounds, cool off.......

Some people have these rituals of how they "break in" a new rifle. So, if you have something that you do please share it with us.

Personally, I dont have a "ritual." I'll go out to the range, fire off a box or two and go home.
 

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15T :)
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Notice the title, it says how do "you" break in a new rifle?

I have heard of people using a bore brush after every round until they get 20+ rounds through the rifle.

Some people will not get the barrel hot the first day out with the rifle. They will fire a few rounds, let the rifle cool off, fire a few rounds, cool off.......

Some people have these rituals of how they "break in" a new rifle. So, if you have something that you do please share it with us.

Personally, I dont have a "ritual." I'll go out to the range, fire off a box or two and go home.
you mean like shooting a new surplus un issued sks until cosmo leaks everywhere?
 

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I go with option #3.

My sks got so hot that the cosmoline caught on fire. She now wears a synthetic stock!
 

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Rifleman
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On a match barrel that I expect to shoot MOA or less I clean after every shot for the first ten shots. Always use a bore guide. Always clean from the breach and never drag a jag or brush back through the barrel. Always clean in the direction of bullet travel. After every hundred or so rounds use JB Bore Paste to lap your barrel.

On a hunting rifle I am not a picky about cleaning the bore. But use the same methods to clean. Just not as often. The kill zone on a deer is around 8" and I don't usually shoot at them over 200 yards or so.
 

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Enjoying Life
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Good thread But having just purchased My First New rifle I am seeking knowledge in this area also. Never crossed my mind with the used guns I have acquired. Thanks Highpower for info. I guess treat it like you want it to shoot.
 

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Knife Nut
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If you want to speed up the process you could use fire lapping, but if you just want to go out and shoot the heck out of it that will work also.
 

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When I get a brand new rifle like the one your about to get, even with the thin sporter barrel it will shoot to 1/2 with match ammo. I am talk Savage Model 11 with accutrigger.

I first clean the barrel with normal bore cleaner from the action side.
I then took the scope,stock and again with the bolt removed, I put the barrel resting on a clean 3 time folded towel to protect the rifling, and a padded pair of vice grips clamp to the recevier, I poured two pots of the hardest boiling water down the barrel to open up the pours of the metal.

I then take a ONE piece COATED bore cleaning rod and wrap a oversized patch around the cleaning jag. At this point one starts to put liberal amounts a JB Bore Paste and run it back and forth through the bore 10 times.

You will be amazed how BLACK it comes out. That black stuff is oil and metal shaving ground in to the bore it's self during the rifling process.

After the first 10 passes, disgaurd the patch and put a fresh patch and paste and do it another 10 times. Do this process another 8 times.

After doing this the last patch will still look alittle dirty but you'll never remove every bit of it. Don't worry you got the bulk though.

Again pour two more pots of boiling water down the bore. As long as your water was hot enough only one or two drops of water should remain the rest should have either flowed through or evaporated. Chase out the drops with a dry bore patch.

Again clean the rifle with standard bore cleaner and then use a light oil to coat the bore against rust.

Reassymble the rifle and torque the stock screws to 60 INCH pounds. AGAIN I STRESS INCH pounds! Remount the scope.

At the range clean the barrel after every 5 shots for the first 10 rounds.

Then after every 10 rounds for 30 rounds,

After that clean it after every 20 rounds for the next 60 rounds.

After that I'd run a DRY brush athe range after every 30 rounds or so, I did mine every 20 rounds(a box) to make it easier to remember.

Then when on gets home to clean it clean it with your favorite bore and copper cleaners and you should have a tack driver for the next 10,000 with proper care.



Rifleman 336
 

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I clean them, shoot them and then clean them afterwards...I use to be overly particular about following break in procedures.
I finally gave up on the whole break in thing and have found that after several sessions of shooting and cleaning the groups tighten up and the bore cleans up easy...
I haven't seem any real difference in accuracy between those rifles I was particular about breaking in and those I just shot the heck out and cleaned after every session....
YMMV
 

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Enjoying Life
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Rifleman thanks for the info. I too will be breaking in a Model 11 LH took me a while to find it. I will let you know how it shoots.
 

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Slayer of Sacred Cows
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I clean them, shoot them and then clean them afterwards...I use to be overly particular about following break in procedures.
I finally gave up on the whole break in thing and have found that after several sessions of shooting and cleaning the groups tighten up and the bore cleans up easy...
I haven't seem any real difference in accuracy between those rifles I was particular about breaking in and those I just shot the heck out and cleaned after every session....
YMMV

True, the main thing in a long range rifle is to be consistant in how you clean it between shooting sessions and make sure the bore is "dry" (solvent and lubricant free) when done cleaning.
 

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You don't, just shoot it, keep it clean. I clean my weapons after every range session, no mater how many rounds down the pipe. I never put a rifle away dirty. My dad was US Army ground pounder for 21 years M/SGT and I was in Navy Marine Corps for 20 years. We were taught to keep our weapons clean period. Breaking in a new rifle is just so much internet bull****. What you are doing is getting rid of the tool marks just forward of the chamber and these wear away with normal shooting and cleaning.
Cheers & Tighter Groups: Eaglesnester
 

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Notice the title, it says how do "you" break in a new rifle?

I have heard of people using a bore brush after every round until they get 20+ rounds through the rifle.

Some people will not get the barrel hot the first day out with the rifle. They will fire a few rounds, let the rifle cool off, fire a few rounds, cool off.......

Some people have these rituals of how they "break in" a new rifle. So, if you have something that you do please share it with us.

Personally, I dont have a "ritual." I'll go out to the range, fire off a box or two and go home.
break in of a new barrel...MOA gun or otherwise rifle or pistol, doesn't matter to me. i do the same thing, clean the bore, and then clean it agian after every rd for 20 rds, using match ammo, then just clean after every time you put a few down range. after 200 or so rds everything tightens up and you can do a more accurate zero. word of CAUTION the shooters i know that have used sweets 7.62 solvent have regreted it. unless they use it after each an every shot and i mean every shot, 1st or the 1000th. unless they decided to quit using it and went back to something like hoppes #9 and NOT another copper solvient, and they then had to repeat the break in process. the reason for this is, and it's also the reason you get tighter groups after the break in period, here goes....in the sholders of the lands are microscopic imperfections (whether the bore has been lapped or not, fyi lapping just wears the lands down faster) as you fire copper jacketed rds through it these imperfections fill leaving you you with a truer bore than you started with. so when you use a copper solvient your actualy working backwards, unlessof course you do it after each 1-3 rds you ever plan to fire from that barrel. some varmit hunters swear by this practice, but they also usualy have 2-3 rifles w/them,so they have one they can shoot while patching the one they just shot w/copper solvient. dosen't make a bit of sence to me, and i've shot long distance for quit a while.
 

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You don't, just shoot it, keep it clean. I clean my weapons after every range session, no mater how many rounds down the pipe. I never put a rifle away dirty. My dad was US Army ground pounder for 21 years M/SGT and I was in Navy Marine Corps for 20 years. We were taught to keep our weapons clean period. Breaking in a new rifle is just so much internet bull****. What you are doing is getting rid of the tool marks just forward of the chamber and these wear away with normal shooting and cleaning.
Cheers & Tighter Groups: Eaglesnester
Agreed. You don't have to break in a new rifle. Anyone who says that's just full of it.

When I buy a new rifle, I clean the barrel because you never know what's happened to it while it's been in the store. Then I go out and fire round after round to get a feel for the weapon. I usually fire until I feel comfortable with the gun. Then I clean the weapon and put it away.
 

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Breaking in a weapon

First I look at it, point my finger at it and demand that it obey's me. I then remind it that I bought it, and it is mine.

I then take it to the range, fire one round, and ask the weapon, "how ya doin there bud"?

Then fire off a couple more. Lay the weapon down, yell at it, and tell it they are doing it all wrong, make my weapon do 50 push ups, and tighten up.

I then fire 10 rounds and clean.:D:


OK, I really just clean it after purchase, fire around 20 times, break down, and clean again, fire 20 more cleaning barrel each 20 shots or so. After firing that day, thorough cleaning back at the ranch.
 

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Agreed. You don't have to break in a new rifle. Anyone who says that's just full of it.

When I buy a new rifle, I clean the barrel because you never know what's happened to it while it's been in the store. Then I go out and fire round after round to get a feel for the weapon. I usually fire until I feel comfortable with the gun. Then I clean the weapon and put it away.
tell that to all the competitive shooters out there, especialy the long distance shooters.......all you'll get is a knowing smile, and probably..........the look.
 
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