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Acolyte
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118 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm certain it's been asked before however, I am on a limited budget and I would like to start prepping. I would love advice on what to save up for and what I need to buy and what isn't worth getting etc.

If you have answered this sort of thing before perhaps handing me a link? :)

I'm excited to get started and have done alot of reading but I am sure your wisdom will be more invaluable than most of what I've read on google.

Thank you in advance,
Bloodocean7.
 

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Start prepping for small scale event then move up to the bigger event. It makes no sense to have enough ammo and guns for the next 3 generations if you only have a weeks worth of food.

I would suggest first things to go for is

1. 5 gallon container of water
2. Portable water filter
3. Weeks worth of canned food set aside specifically for emergencies
4. Basic set of camping gear for bug out gear
5. Basic first aid kit
6. Basic firearm set up
-Handgun with 300 rounds of ammo
-Rifle with 500 rounds or shotgun with 300 rounds of ammo

After all that is taken care of move up these categories to month long survival plan.

Hope this helps. I know it seems like a lot but take it one step at a time. I started prepping with just 50 dollars a month set aside and I am now set up very nicely for most emergencies.
 

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Acolyte
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118 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
It seems daunting but doable and will be well worth the investment, I will start out with this and move up. :) If anyone has anything to add I am all ears I am making a list of items I will bring with me each time I go shopping. :)
 

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There is a great list on the forum about what you can get for 200.00. It is a very comprehensive list. I do not know where it is, does anyone else?
 

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Survivor
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Prioritize your survival times. Start with what you need to survive for 3 days, then move to 2 weeks, then 1 month and so on. As a broke college kid that was my approach. Skills are free to learn.

I wouldn't go hog crazy in any specific thing (especially firearms or other survival items) until you have a basic set of things you need. That being said there is merit to saving up for some quality items depending on your situation.

Assume you only had what is on hand at your locale.

Can you feed yourself? ie:heat and make foods
Can you protect yourself? relative to your area and needs
Can you stay warm?

That's my advice in a nutshell, start with the basics and research the more expensive purchases. I buy 1-2 extra beans and some bullets when I am out shopping. It adds up over time.

Right now your priority might be stuff for power outages, and natural disasters. Hope that helps.

Food-Water-Shelter
 

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Preparing
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Sorry, I don't have the link but this site has a thread for $5 preps as well as discount store/ thrift store scores. Do a search. They're here somewhere, I promise.

Knowledge and skills are usually free/cheap AND, they don't take up any storage space!
 

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Do you have an Aldi's in your area?

Aldi has cheaper groceries, and it works because you bus your own cart and sack your own groceries and either buy the bags or bring your own. This means they hire fewer people, which means they can charge lower prices on MOST (not all) of the food that they sell.

Paying less for food means that you can buy some canned or boxed food every week to store
 

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Indefatigable
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20,551 Posts
I'm certain it's been asked before however, I am on a limited budget and I would like to start prepping. I would love advice on what to save up for and what I need to buy and what isn't worth getting etc.
The list of what you need is specific to each person and the scenario they consider their biggest threat. It's just like packing for vacation - you pack what you need for where you want to go and what you want to do once you are there. I live in Oklahoma, I don't prep for tidal waves or avalanches, but I am recently learning more about earthquakes.
If you have answered this sort of thing before perhaps handing me a link? :)
At the bottom of every post there are a list of links on the same subject. Scroll to the bottom of this page, you will find 4.

In addition I find using a public search engine easier than the one on this site. For example, using Bing here is a list of "preps for $5". By adding the words survivalist forum to the beginning of the search, the first results returned were from here.
http://www.bing.com/search?q=survivalist+forum+%245+preps+on+a+budget&go=Submit&qs=n&form=QBLH&pq=survivalist+forum+%245+preps+on+a+budget&sc=0-19&sp=-1&sk=&ghc=1&cvid=61762603b80942c8840c4f3aedcc1121
If you aren't already familiar with Pinterest, check that one out too. There are some great prepping ideas there.
 

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I'm certain it's been asked before however, I am on a limited budget and I would like to start prepping. I would love advice on what to save up for and what I need to buy and what isn't worth getting etc.

If you have answered this sort of thing before perhaps handing me a link? :)

I'm excited to get started and have done alot of reading but I am sure your wisdom will be more invaluable than most of what I've read on google.

Thank you in advance,
Bloodocean7.
Always remember rule #1 : NEVER tell anyone about your preps. breaking that one rule can sink your ship real fast.

Don't worry about getting bug-out gear and heading for the hills. The odds your going to have to bug-out to the hills are so small its really highly improbable it will ever happen. Once you have gotten to a comfortable place in your bugg-in preparedness you can stretch out into buggin-out prepping later.

Its best and most probable to be prepared to bugg-in whether its short term or long term. Camping gear like a propane stove will come in handy.

For food storage here is the cheapest and most efficient way of doing it.(plz over look all the bad grammar and stuff LoL).

http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=186765&highlight=food+storage+101


Just remember most of us started just like you 1 week at a time before you know it storage space will be a problem because you don't know where your going to put all this stuff ( lol that's a good problem to have). :thumb:

A lot of the items I have gotten I got through yard sales or auctions specially camping gear you can get stuff for pennies on the dollar.
 

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Storyteller
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there are plenty of articles on the web -use "12 Months of Prepping, One Month at a Time" or similar search strings.

PLAN first - that way when you do spend money - it is for a reason. Planning is cheap.


Finally, Johnny Cash was right - **get it one piece at a time**
 

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The first thing is, take a look at what situations your area is likely to see. Unemployment? Earthquake? Tornado?

With that in mind, look around, live your normal life for a week but be constantly asking "How would I be effected if I lost power, water, even rule of law for a week/month/year?" Keeping that in the forefront as you go about your day will open your eyes to whats missing.

For me, WATER, WATER, WATER. Then food, first aid, heat in winter, etc.

An easy start is tweaking your purchasing. Buy in bulk, and replenish early, so you always have more on the shelf. When you buy goods, look of there is something more robust, or with flexibility that will help you in an emergency situation, even if it costs a little more.

Dont feel rushed, you will get there.
 

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Don't be fooled into buying a lot of expensive dehydrated food. Or fancy gear. Or any item that is called a "survival (fill in the blank)".

Food and water are number one priority. In the north, staying warm is a number one priority in the winter. Other priorities are set by whatever disaster your neck of the woods is prone to. Tornado alley calls for a plan on where to take shelter. Gulf coast calls for a plan to leave and go inland a bit. Flood and fire prone areas call for a plan to evacuate very quickly. Much of the country calls for a plan to withstand frigid temps/blizzard for several days in case of power outage. Earthquake country calls for a different sort of plan. But the plan is the thing and a plan costs nothing to create, just thought, flexibility and creativity. Knowing what you are going to do is more important than any gear.

Initially you will be prepping to stay in place for those natural disasters that are most likely, not TEOTWAWKI. Budgets and BOLs and tricked out BOVs do not go together, nor do they allow for TEOTWAWKI preps. Most everything you need for short term survival is available at the local Costco or Food for Less or Walmart or Sports Chalet. (As your economic situation improves, no doubt you'll move up to more expensive gear.)

Buy the same food you use every day but start building up a buffer. Say you grab a couple of 5 gallon buckets to store it in. Then one day you get an extra bag of rice. Maybe the next time a pound of salt. Maybe after that a couple of extra cans of condensed soup. And then a bottle of multivitamins. Store it so that you always eat the oldest stuff first and you'll never have a problem with cans rusting thru and so on. Pretty soon your pantry and your 5 gallon buckets will be full of food you like to eat and as long as you keep cycling it thru it will last forever.

At work people bring in gallon bottles of water, then discard them. I snag them and just fill them up with water again. Eventually I ran out of places to put them. Stackable Aqua-Pak water carriers are useful too, just not free. Kept in a cool dark place the water will stay perfectly good as long as the container lasts (decades). If you have a back yard a quick, cheap way to store a lot of water is an above ground swimming pool. Put a cover over it and add a bit of chlorine every now and then. Buy a more permanent tank later. If there is natural water to be had a backpacking filter is a good thing to have.

Don't buy the XYZ Survival Knife. Buy a simple Case or Buck knife or a Victorinox SWA. You don't need top of the line anything, get something that is simple, affordable and does the job. If you feel the need for a firearm, you don't need a the latest state of the art battle rifle, a used lever gun in a common caliber and a few hundred rounds will do fine. Later when you have more money than is good for you you can start collecting high value hardware.
 

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Acolyte
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118 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Don't be fooled into buying a lot of expensive dehydrated food. Or fancy gear. Or any item that is called a "survival (fill in the blank)".

Food and water are number one priority. In the north, staying warm is a number one priority in the winter. Other priorities are set by whatever disaster your neck of the woods is prone to. Tornado alley calls for a plan on where to take shelter. Gulf coast calls for a plan to leave and go inland a bit. Flood and fire prone areas call for a plan to evacuate very quickly. Much of the country calls for a plan to withstand frigid temps/blizzard for several days in case of power outage. Earthquake country calls for a different sort of plan. But the plan is the thing and a plan costs nothing to create, just thought, flexibility and creativity. Knowing what you are going to do is more important than any gear.

Initially you will be prepping to stay in place for those natural disasters that are most likely, not TEOTWAWKI. Budgets and BOLs and tricked out BOVs do not go together, nor do they allow for TEOTWAWKI preps. Most everything you need for short term survival is available at the local Costco or Food for Less or Walmart or Sports Chalet. (As your economic situation improves, no doubt you'll move up to more expensive gear.)

Buy the same food you use every day but start building up a buffer. Say you grab a couple of 5 gallon buckets to store it in. Then one day you get an extra bag of rice. Maybe the next time a pound of salt. Maybe after that a couple of extra cans of condensed soup. And then a bottle of multivitamins. Store it so that you always eat the oldest stuff first and you'll never have a problem with cans rusting thru and so on. Pretty soon your pantry and your 5 gallon buckets will be full of food you like to eat and as long as you keep cycling it thru it will last forever.

At work people bring in gallon bottles of water, then discard them. I snag them and just fill them up with water again. Eventually I ran out of places to put them. Stackable Aqua-Pak water carriers are useful too, just not free. Kept in a cool dark place the water will stay perfectly good as long as the container lasts (decades). If you have a back yard a quick, cheap way to store a lot of water is an above ground swimming pool. Put a cover over it and add a bit of chlorine every now and then. Buy a more permanent tank later. If there is natural water to be had a backpacking filter is a good thing to have.

Don't buy the XYZ Survival Knife. Buy a simple Case or Buck knife or a Victorinox SWA. You don't need top of the line anything, get something that is simple, affordable and does the job. If you feel the need for a firearm, you don't need a the latest state of the art battle rifle, a used lever gun in a common caliber and a few hundred rounds will do fine. Later when you have more money than is good for you you can start collecting high value hardware.
This is very informative and gives me alot of hope for building up my stockpiles even on my budget. I was also wondering about all that survival food etc and Im glad you talked me out of spending a fortune on that when canned goods will do. As for water do I have to add drops of bleach or something or can I just store 5 gallon buckets of water? At my work we have tons of pickle buckets 5 gallon made of plastic, can these be used? I can get them free.
 

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This is very informative and gives me alot of hope for building up my stockpiles even on my budget. I was also wondering about all that survival food etc and Im glad you talked me out of spending a fortune on that when canned goods will do. As for water do I have to add drops of bleach or something or can I just store 5 gallon buckets of water? At my work we have tons of pickle buckets 5 gallon made of plastic, can these be used? I can get them free.
Check if the lids have a seal or gasket in them or if the seal is still in good condition. If not, water will evaporate.
 

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If you "do it properly" it SAVES you money (buying in bulk when there's grocery sales is a GREAT way to start.

These savings offset the few expenses you may not use anyway (first aid, water filter, perhaps a firearm)

Go slow, don't operate from fear.
Its late, I'm tired, hit me up if I need to run my suck more on the subject.
 

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This is very informative and gives me alot of hope for building up my stockpiles even on my budget. I was also wondering about all that survival food etc and Im glad you talked me out of spending a fortune on that when canned goods will do. As for water do I have to add drops of bleach or something or can I just store 5 gallon buckets of water? At my work we have tons of pickle buckets 5 gallon made of plastic, can these be used? I can get them free.
IMO "Survival Food" is the frosting on the cake. It can be very nice to have but this is waaaaay down your survival priority list.

Start storing the food that you normally eat that are shelf stable. So if you eat spaghetti, next time you go to the store buy an extra jar of sauce and a package of noodles. The following week add some tuna or canned chicken. Extra bottle of oil, some salt, sugar, etc. Keep doing this until you can go a while without having to go grocery shopping.

Don't store anything that you don't normally eat.

If anything, starting to store food will actually save you money. You can buy extra when it is on sale and then you'll have a stockpile and won't need to buy anymore until it goes on sale again.

On a related note, our local Dollar Store carried ultra pasteurized milk that is shelf stable for a year. A buck a quart. Taste much better than dried IMO.

Storing water in pickle buckets is fine -- they're food grade after all. Most water that is used in an average house does NOT need to be potable. Showers, washing clothes, flushing the toilet, watering the dog, etc. A couple drops of bleach can be used or not. Keep the water cool and dark and you shouldn't have much problem with it.

You may want to save 2 liter soda bottles for your drinking water so it doesn't smell of pickles. Have friends save them for you.

Do you have a BBQ grill or some other way to heat food without electricity. If not, build a backyard fire pit and gather branches from around your neighborhood. Or buy a propane camp stove.

Pick up some used candles at yard sales or thrift stores for cheap. Stock a few LED flashlights with extra batteries.

Indoor heating for cheap can get tricky. Always be aware of Carbon Monoxide poisoning. Extra blankets or comforters can be found cheap at thrift stores.

If you do just these few things, you will be ahead of 90% of the US population.
 

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Isaiah 41:10, Acts 5:29
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Check if the lids have a seal or gasket in them or if the seal is still in good condition. If not, water will evaporate.
If the lid is no good, you can get a replacement lid. Snap ons are cheaper, but gammas twist on and off. You could get one gamma lid and use that to replace the snap on lid on a bucket if you have to use it sometime in the future. Not every bucket has to have a gamma, but all lids used on your food safe buckets need to be food safe (the lids that come on the food grade buckets at food establishments are food grade). Replacement seals are also available.

Rule of thumb is to store what you eat and eat what you store. A caveat is to store in the size you use, and use the size you store, at least for perishable items. A one or two person family won't use a 5 pound canned ham before it goes bad if there is no refrigeration or it is not recanned. Another caveat is to only buy what you will reasonably use before it goes bad. In a regular rotation of your pantry during normal times, you probably won't eat a can of peas every day for two years, even though if SHTF, you might be really happy to do so. So some of those canned peas could go bad before you ate them if you bought 700 cans of them. Even at a good price, that's going to be more expensive than buying a variety of veggies at higher prices when there is no waste.

A good strategy to build up your pantry is to buy one extra can of something every time you go grocery shopping because there is never a huge outlay. If you don't have money in the budget for prepping, doing it this way and keeping the grocery budget the same will cause you to economize a little on groceries and still end up with a well stocked pantry. If something you use regularly is on sale, get one of those as your extra for that trip. Combine coupons with sale prices and coupon doubling. Watch sales flyers and plan your shopping before going, but be flexible. And don't drive to a bunch of stores to save a few pennies because you'll spend more in gas than you save.

Make sure you have at least one (preferably two) manual can opener. Not all cans have a pull top and sometimes the pull top breaks/malfunctions so a can opener is needed. They can be obtained for $1 at Family Dollar. A P38 on your key ring has multiple uses and they cost less than a dollar apiece.

Although there is a start-up cost, canning in the long run is cheaper, and you can preserve exactly what you want in exactly the size you want. This is especially helpful for food allergies/sensitivities/dislikes or singles/couples that cannot find some things in small enough sizes. Meat requires a pressure canner, and there is a difference between a pressure canner and a pressure cooker. You need the pressure canner to can.

Try to get an extra 90 day supply of your prescription meds and rotate it/them like you rotate your food. Insurance may or may not cover an early refill, and this may be impossible for certain meds, either due to laws or perishability. Note: if anyone ever finds out you have prescription pain meds, you will be a target for theft/burglary/robbery/worse long before any SHTF. If you take meds that are very perishable, you might want to investigate other options that are less susceptible to spoilage (so long as your health is not adversely affected).
 

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Water, water, water. :)

I have found some good bargains at yard sales, ebay and thrift stores. (I have heard of bargains at surplus stores as well).

First I agree with above, make a list of what you are planning for. Start with smaller things and work your way up. Make lists, so you aren't sidetracked by what seems like a good deal, but you don't really need.

Also, skills and knowledge are relatively cheap, but invaluable.

Don't fall into the long term storage food trap until you have your regular canned goods for 6 months to a year stocked up. Buy what you normally eat.

Good luck to you. :)
 
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