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I'm looking for another canner and was considering the All American - the two we have now are Presto.

Has anyone used the 30 or 41 quart All American with two layers of quart jars at once? It almost seems too much. On the other hand, I'm considering just the 15.5 quart because I haven't done two layers in my 23 quart Prestos.
 

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Not sure which All American we use but it does 14 quarts at a time and that's enough..

I can't imagine a 30 or 41 unit.... When we're making soups, we already have to use two large pots to mix everything in.. the stove top gets crowded fast and there isn't really room for any more pots up there.
 

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I have the AA 930, it'll hold 14 quarts in a double stack. I also have a Mirror and a Presto that hold 7 quarts each and a small Mirror that holds 4 quarts. I use which ever fits the job I'm doing best.

The AA 930 is nice but its takes a while to come to pressure and it seems to take FOREVER to cool off since there's a lot of stuff there to cool. That being said if I'm doing a dozen or so quarts its nice to do them all in one load and be done.
 

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Not sure which All American we use but it does 14 quarts at a time and that's enough..
That's a 30-quart canner. That's the biggest I'd ever want to have to wrassle with, but I'm actually happier with my 21 quart that does 7 quarts or 19 pints. I mostly can in pints or smaller anyway, don't have a truck garden, and if I wanted more canning capacity, I'd prefer two 21-quart canners to a giant 41 quart. The smaller 21-quart canner fits my kitchen, my stove, and me better. But if you have a big enough, strong enough stove with enough clearance above your burners and some homegrown musclemen available to haul a 30- or 41-quart around, it will process more jars faster.

It's one of those personal choice things--they make different sizes because one size doesn't suit all. :)

ETA:*As Old Soldier notes, the bigger the canner, the longer the heat-up and cool-down time. Since there is no testing done for the difference in total thermal load that results from that, and therefore no way to adjust processing time for it, I think a 41-quart tends to overprocess things, which is another reason I would personally vote for filling two 21-quart canners instead. But as I noted above, YMMV. The additional up-front cost for 2 smaller canners is not negligible, but considering it can be amortized over the long, long lifetime of AA canners, I'd personally still go that way.
 

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I bought mine on Craigslist for $50.. The lady used it twice and said it was just too heavy for her..
If you're a female on the short side and using it on a standard stove, you may also need a step stool to haul a 30- or 41-quart canner on and off it. :upsidedown: (Those handles on a 41-quart will be almost 4-1/2 feet above the floor.)
 

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I have a 930 and find it large enough, the 941 is just too big for me to handle solo. Weight is one issue, but really filling it would be a pain. I've been keeping my eyes open for a used 921. That way when I want to process a lot of stuff, I'd be able to stagger them and have little down time.
 

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If you're a female on the short side and using it on a standard stove, you may also need a step stool to haul a 30- or 40-quart canner on and off it. :upsidedown:
Yes! I'm fine until I have to empty the water. I can do it, but that is one thing I can get someone else to do.

When I have to empty it, I bail a lot of the water out.
 

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Not sure which All American we use but it does 14 quarts at a time and that's enough..

I can't imagine a 30 or 41 unit.... When we're making soups, we already have to use two large pots to mix everything in.. the stove top gets crowded fast and there isn't really room for any more pots up there.
I do chicken soup by doing the veggies in one pot and the meat in another. That way I can put in 1 1/2 cups of meat and a cup or so of veggies and then fill with two cups of broth. I don't have to worry about making sure everything is well mixed because I'm assured of getting enough meat and the veggies vary a bit.
 

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I do chicken soup by doing the veggies in one pot and the meat in another. That way I can put in 1 1/2 cups of meat and a cup or so of veggies and then fill with two cups of broth. I don't have to worry about making sure everything is well mixed because I'm assured of getting enough meat and the veggies vary a bit.
I do Veggie Beef soup like that, everything is measured so every jar is identical.
 

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I'm looking for another canner and was considering the All American - the two we have now are Presto.

Has anyone used the 30 or 41 quart All American with two layers of quart jars at once? It almost seems too much. On the other hand, I'm considering just the 15.5 quart because I haven't done two layers in my 23 quart Prestos.
I have canned many thousands of quart jars double stacked in an All American 941 (AA941). No issues whatsoever doing so 18 or 19 quarts at a time.

The only issues with an AA 941 is its size & weight (around 75 or 80 lbs full loaded). Which will often scorch an electric stove top around the electric element. So, a gas stove is advisable. They also take longer to heat up & cool down than smaller ones

When canning big loads, we run 2 & do it on the back concrete patio on gas burners. Advantage is low height of gas burners, which makes it easy for 2 of us to lift/move loaded ones.

Presto 23 quart is good on an electric stove, as is an AA 925.

Have seen people who bought an AA 930, only to discover it would not fit under their range hood.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Not sure which All American we use but it does 14 quarts at a time and that's enough..

I can't imagine a 30 or 41 unit.... When we're making soups, we already have to use two large pots to mix everything in.. the stove top gets crowded fast and there isn't really room for any more pots up there.
The 30 and 41 quart canners will hold 14 quart jars. Don't forget to allow for the water :)

So you are doing 14 quart batches?
 
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Discussion Starter #18
I have the AA 930, it'll hold 14 quarts in a double stack. I also have a Mirror and a Presto that hold 7 quarts each and a small Mirror that holds 4 quarts. I use which ever fits the job I'm doing best.

The AA 930 is nice but its takes a while to come to pressure and it seems to take FOREVER to cool off since there's a lot of stuff there to cool. That being said if I'm doing a dozen or so quarts its nice to do them all in one load and be done.
So that's an interesting consideration. Heating time and cooling time is more cooking on the product yet only time at pressure counts as canning time. Do you notice any deterioration in quality using the big canner with 14 quarts in it?
 
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Discussion Starter #19
I have canned many thousands of quart jars double stacked in an All American 941 (AA941). No issues whatsoever doing so 18 or 19 quarts at a time.

The only issues with an AA 941 is its size & weight (around 75 or 80 lbs full loaded). Which will often scorch an electric stove top around the electric element. So, a gas stove is advisable. They also take longer to heat up & cool down than smaller ones

When canning big loads, we run 2 & do it on the back concrete patio on gas burners. Advantage is low height of gas burners, which makes it easy for 2 of us to lift/move loaded ones.

Presto 23 quart is good on an electric stove, as is an AA 925.

Have seen people who bought an AA 930, only to discover it would not fit under their range hood.
Good suggestions on cooking outside and measuring for the range hood. I think I'm about convinced to go with the smaller unit for us since I already have a couple that size.

For cooking with them outside, what do you do to avoid heat loss due to wind? Maybe a welding screen or tarp would help block the wind.
 
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