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Discussion Starter #1
Well, I am fairly new to the whole prepping deal. But I went out and started getting what I could get. Here's a list of what I have so far - equipment and food & water included. Where do I need to improve, where am I set for good?

My ultimate goal is 1 year for 5 people. But I'm working towards 6 months first. My preps thus far are all long-term food storage in 5 and 6 gallon buckets done with Mylar and the whole shebang.

Food in Pounds:

Rice - 100
Sugar - 100
Flour - 100
Wheat - 180
Pinto Beans - 120
Lentils - 130
Salt - 25

Add to that about a dozen mountain house #10 cans from a few years back

Water - 1 month supply at 2/gal per person per day. 2 months if 1/gal/person/day

Equipment -

Aqua Rain Water Filter. And a Berkey on the Go filter (can't remember the model)
Wonder mill Jr. Deluxe grain grinder
And my dad just picked up some stove that they use in Africa, its small but you can throw twigs in there and start cookin' no problem. I forget what it is called.

I think I'm off to a pretty good start but I would like some advice. One concern I have is the "eat what you store" philosophy. My family eats mostly fresh foods. We aren't big on canned goods minus tomato sauce. And we dont have a garden, even if we did out land isn't well suited with light and area. How can I get around this, or work with it?

Thanks for the input!!
 

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Looks like your off to a good start.

something I would add to your stocks is some kind of home based water filter, like a berkey.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Looks like your off to a good start.

something I would add to your stocks is some kind of home based water filter, like a berkey.

Yep, thanks I forgot to include my water filter. I knew I was missing something!
 

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Here are my tips:

- yeast if you make bread
- powdered milk, juice, tea, coffee
- dehydrated food, at least it's not canned
- canned food can be donated as it is rotated
- protection (gun, knife, etc)
- camping equipment if you can't stay put
- spices you cook with
- fire extinguishers
- books
 

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I've never really understood the whole five gallon bucket thing as far as rotating your food. I have all my food in quart mason jars and bring it up to the kitchen a quart at a time. If you break open a bucket to fill a small jar I guess you'd have to add a fresh oxygen absorber to the bucket. I'd at least rotate small amounts of what you have to your kitchen and try to find ways to prepare it that everyone likes. You may find that people don't like to eat the wheat (or whatever) and then you'll have hundreds of pounds of food no one will eat. I just found out my wife doesn't really like spaghetti after 15 years of marriage LOL. Good thing I didn't go out and buy 200 pounds of it. And I find that smaller quantities of a larger variety is better, especially if people can go down and grab a quart jar of their favorite snack which ends up rotating the food in and out. If I were you I'd get some quart jars and fill at least a few with each item and then put the bulk of it into pails if you prefer the larger buckets/pails. At least you'll be able to rotate it in and out. Also, there are many kinds of rice (basmati, jasmine, etc), many kinds of sugar (white, brown, powdered, etc) and I'd suggest getting more of a variety, especially if you have kids.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Here are my tips:

- yeast if you make bread
- powdered milk, juice, tea, coffee
- dehydrated food, at least it's not canned
- canned food can be donated as it is rotated
- protection (gun, knife, etc)
- camping equipment if you can't stay put
- spices you cook with *check*
- fire extinguishers *check*
- books *check*
Question about the yeast. Can I buy the yeast that doesn't need to be refrigerated and store it long term? I've heard of people getting sick when it goes bad. And as for dehydrated. I was thinking of picked up about 6 months of freeze-dried supply in the near future. And im working towards my gun license, hopefully by the end of the summer I can get around to it. 2 jobs have me crunching for time.
 

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How does your seed stockpile look?

 

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I've never really understood the whole five gallon bucket thing as far as rotating your food. I have all my food in quart mason jars and bring it up to the kitchen a quart at a time. If you break open a bucket to fill a small jar I guess you'd have to add a fresh oxygen absorber to the bucket. I'd at least rotate small amounts of what you have to your kitchen and try to find ways to prepare it that everyone likes. You may find that people don't like to eat the wheat (or whatever) and then you'll have hundreds of pounds of food no one will eat.
The key is in how you pack those buckets. You don't have to dedicate a bucket to only one item. You can put 1 gallon bags in it, or even smaller.

Some foods last long after opening and some not so well. For example, rice lasts fine here in my dry climate, so even though I live alone at the moment, I have no trouble cracking open a 5 gallon bucket of it. It'll be eaten within 6-8 months or so. With the group here, it would probably only be a week before it would be empty.

Some other things that either don't last as well when opened, or you don't use as much of, are better packed in smaller bags. A couple examples might be tomato powder, peanut butter powder, or spices.

As for foods that no one will eat. Don't store them in the first place. The food storage mantra has always been "store what you eat, and eat what you store" for many more reasons that just rotation of food.

Wheat is one of the most versatile of all foods. The western diet is based on it. It's the bases for all our breads, tortillas, many types of snack chips and cereals, gravies, etc. All of which are quite easily made at home. And it last plenty well after opening. So I keep entire buckets of just wheat. It can be sprouted to provide live enzymes, even planted to grow more wheat.
 

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I believe you need also to have some ready-to-eat foods for those times when you are unable to cook. canned foods that can be eaten out of the can cold, or slightly warmed over sterno. or foods that can be made with just hot water, such as instant potatoes, hot chocolate, instant oatmeal.
keep some canned meats, fish, stew, ravioli etc.
there may very well be times coming up when it is unsafe or impossible to cook so have something ready.
 

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Something else you may to consider picking up is some freeze dried foods, either in #10 cans of individual pouches.

I just ordered some stuff:

1 - MOUNTAIN HOUSE Freeze Dried Chili Macaroni #10 can
1 - MOUNTAIN HOUSE Freeze Dried Spaghetti w/ Meat Sauce #10 can
1 - MOUNTAIN HOUSE Freeze Dried Hearty Beef Stew #10 Can
2 - Diced Broccoli - 19 oz
 
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