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The Ozarks are a good place for most, but not for everybody.

My sister gets breathing trouble when it is humid, and I have trouble when it is hot. If you have similar physical trouble that needs to be taken into account.

If you have no physical problems I would stay in the Ozarks.
 

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The Ozarks are a good place for most, but not for everybody.
I see this recommended from time to but don't understand it. To be fair, I've never been there...but on paper it looks like its just a little spot in the middle of a hundred million people. I don't think I would ever want to live in some area that densely populated. Really, everything east of colorado looks like solid people all the way to the coast.
 

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Probably on a remote island on the inside passage of southeast Alaska. An island large enough to hold plenty of game and protected enough to allow small craft access to an endless abundance of food from the ocean. You would have unlimited fresh water and decent growing seasons to go with abundant food from the ocean and land. Solar and wind could provide year round power. One would just need to be tough enough to handle the extreme isolation and rainy weather.
 

· patriarch
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I see this recommended from time to but don't understand it. To be fair, I've never been there...but on paper it looks like its just a little spot in the middle of a hundred million people. I don't think I would ever want to live in some area that densely populated. Really, everything east of colorado looks like solid people all the way to the coast.
They call it the Ozark mountains. About like the Hoosier National Forest, really are just hills. Rocky, cattle have legs shorter one one side from walking on the side of the hills. :D:
 

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Yeah...but they are surrounded by huge cities will millions of people, and its not a very big area, just a little island of forest in the middle of a huge population. I don't see how it wouldn't just be over run.

I'd want a place big enough to get lost in.
While it's true that it's not "the big empty"


...there's WELL under 20 people per mile around me, and while there ARE cities....

There's no "easy" ways to get there from here.

Refugees aren't going to take "the road less traveled " over and over, and over and over, and over and over, and past the banjo's playing, and over, and over, and across the dropped bridge(s), and over, and over, and over, and cut up the trees across the road, and over, and over, and over, and off blacktop, and over, and over, and over, and up the road/track that often Need 4x4 NOW, and over, and over..... etc
Hours and hours away (from a city) on a GOOD day.

There's more livestock around me than people
The people are used to being poor and making due
And we have water.... something that's far more of an issue in the west (and along with the cold... the top 2 reasons I ruled it out.)

Note:
I've visited 47 states...
And I have several thousand unoccupied acres around me, my nearest neighbor on the single road is 1/2 mile away
 

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Nomad hit it pretty close.

There are a lot of very good places to homestead with assurance of sustainability. There is a real problem with being disrupted by people in about 99% of these. I will say without a doubt that there is a region in every single state where one can build a sustainable homestead. By the same token there are regions in every single state where you likely will have a people problem.

The practicality of being able to choose just any state to live in is likely not possible unless you are independently wealthy already so think more along the lines on how you can reach sustainability and defend/avoid in regards to people wherever you are at or choose to be. The key is how resourceful and skilled (plus personal preference) you are rather than the particular state you might choose (and where you can make a living while building a sustainable homestead) . Now remember that is a general rule, some places obviously have hordes of unprepared people who WILL be a problem.

Also I've been in every state (50), most multiple times, most of Canada (except Maritimes) and much of Mexico (north of Mexico City).
 

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Yeah...but they are surrounded by huge cities will millions of people, and its not a very big area, just a little island of forest in the middle of a huge population. I don't see how it wouldn't just be over run.

I'd want a place big enough to get lost in.
Yes, people wanting to homestead should avoid the Ozarks and the Ouachitas nothing to see here. Lots better places out west. Just joking while not the wilderness of some parts of the US still a good place to buy a small farm and raise a family. One draw back is that some of us natives are not really welcoming to outsiders.
 

· off-grid organic farmer
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I see this recommended from time to but don't understand it. To be fair, I've never been there...but on paper it looks like its just a little spot in the middle of a hundred million people. I don't think I would ever want to live in some area that densely populated.
My parents both came from that region. They left at 6 and 8 years old during the Dust Bowl era.

The area is prone to extremely severe droughts.

I settled in Maine. In a township with less than 10 people per square-mile.
 
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