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Discussion Starter #1
Some of you may have seen my thread on tomato roll ups.
http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=83079

Well I decided to do a mini-shtf trial run to test the outcome of some of my food preps

Started with one to two cups of boiling water


Added one of my prepared tomato roll ups. I store them in vacuum bags wrapped in parchment paper


Added a 1/2 cup of dehydrated mixed vegetables (should have added a cup). Tip - Buy frozen vegetables. They are already blanched and can be put directly on the dehydrating trays.


Reduced to a simmer and cook 20-30 minutes


Finished product. Warm vegetable soup in homemade Georgia pottery on cool November night. I can see where this would be a comfort food after shtf. Might consider adding a beef or chicken bouillon to add more flavor. Meat could also be added to give the soup more substance.


 

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Discussion Starter #3
So, how did it turn out? Tasty or just palatable?
Very filling, but a little bland. Think the bouillon and some other spices would've put the finishing touches on it.

Would be very much appreciated if needed. Don't want to have to stand in a Katrina line one day.
 

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You know, this recipe alone has made me want to go out and buy a dehydrator. Just the idea of throwing some stuff in water and getting a meal is appealing, not just for survival situations, but for day to day. It's just too easy to resort to pre-packaged foods that really aren't good for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
You know, this recipe alone has made me want to go out and buy a dehydrator. Just the idea of throwing some stuff in water and getting a meal is appealing, not just for survival situations, but for day to day. It's just too easy to resort to pre-packaged foods that really aren't good for you.
+1 - If you get one go ahead and invest in quality one like an excalibur. Mine is stainless steel version called The Sausage Maker, and it really gets down to business. I can dehydrate in half the time compared to other dehydraters.

I like the transportability of dehydrated foods. Below I've package 8 tomato rolls in 2 packs. (Notice I sealed bouillon cubes as well for added flavor) I can throw these in a BOB or BOV and hardly take up any space, and they are lightweight. Each pack will provide about a weeks worth of meals. Homemade MREs if you will :cool:

I making Pumpkin Pie Bark tonight (Dried Pumkin Pie Mix - thread on that coming soon)

 

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We shredded then dried the pumpkin. That worked. We boiled some and added butter--oh my was that good. I think you'd have to watch the boiling carefully to make pie filling. I am curious if simmering a pumpkin leather would be better for filling?

I'd love to see pice of your dehydrator.

OVC
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Overcomer - Here's some pictures of the dehydrator I use







SgtBooker44 - +1 on the kinks. Dealing with the stress after shtf is not the time to figure out if your prep will work or not.
 

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any other trays?

does this brand come with a smaller mesh? Corn and other mixed vegitables would fall through the holes? Do fruit leather sheets or silicon sheets come with or do you use something else?
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Scienceteacher,
I think the company sells a model that's made just for fruits and vegetables. I just wrap my trays in Aluminum Foil and poke holes in the foil to allow better air flow

http://www.sausagemaker.com/



When making leathers I tape a ziplock bag face down on the trays. The leathers peal off easy when dry.

ConnieD,

This particular model is 800w and has a fan (which aids in drying times), so it does make some noise, but its nothing that's going to run you out of the house. My other dehydrator is a plastic model with a heating element that takes twice as long.
 
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