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Last few weeks we have been busy doing home repairs and improvements. This has really been bugging me as I keep thinking the money should be going to be preps.

Today it occurred to me we prep for the mostly likely things first and then move on to less likely. Well job loss and having to suddenly move and sell our home while my husbands job is fairly secure it it's not an impossible thing and when I look at other things even loss of power has only happen for a couple of hours in the last 20 years here.

Keep in mind for us our improvements are mostly necessity repairs nothing ridiculously expensive or that make the home less likely to sell due to be over priced for the area.

I feel much better that if I had to put my home on the market for sale at a moments notice soon that wouldn't be a huge mess or dash to fix anything.

Keeping my preps out of sight so even a buyer touring the home wouldn't notice them is just one more thing I hope I'm doing right.

The best part is we're doing the work ourselves so it's not a huge expense and still leaves money left for other preps.
 

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Pleasantly demented woman
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Togetherness is also a prep. :)
 
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I'm making repairs too our house also. I figure I better get it fixed up before hyperinfaltion hits and I can't afford it or products I need may become unavailable. If I lose my job, and the eves are still rotting, I may lose my shelter too. It makes sense to have your home in readiness, another insurance measure and peace for my mind.
 

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Doing repairs is part of prepping as much as keeping up the first aid kit, maintaining the vehicle, rotating the food and keeping current any weapons or ammo.

Doing these things to gether is a family activity that builds trust,confidence and teaches the next generation.

Everyone does not know how to do simple repairs. It is a valuable skill.

I spent Friday last week installing a new hot water heater in a friends' house. I actually had a class of our friends assembled to watch. These were adults, homeowners, professional people that always paid to have these things done. When they found out I could do this work they did not ask me to do it, they asked me to teach them.
 

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To secure peace is to...
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I see car maintenance is another, often overlooked area of prepping. I do all of my own maintenance because both my truck and my wife's car have to get us to work...so that we can make money to maintain our "stuff."

I also keep 2 full oil changes with filters on hand, among other common maintenance items for both of our vehicles. I couldn't afford to buy all of those preps at one time, but over time, I have bought a little here and there and now have a nice set of spare parts (even though both of our vehicles aren't really old) they will still need them at some point.

My motto on maintenance is: You can choose to do it at your convenience, or it will choose to "do you" when it is most inconvenient.
 

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I have had the exact same thoughts. I recently looked at the best bang for my buck for going green. My home is 17 years old and I recently replaced my entire HVAC system, changing to a split system, 19 seer rating and added 2 tons of ac. I had solar screens installed and put 5 inches of open cell foam in the attics. I had my soffits and fascia changed first since I want to go to Hardie board on the entire house soon and when sealing the attics, they seal the soffits to the top plate. I will spray foam underneath (raised LA home) in November, closed cell, when humidity subsides. I have an addition planned for a soapstone woodburning stove to complement an existing large fireplace and the new heating system. Am considering a "Big Ass Fan," which is an 8 foot fan, equivalent to 9 ceiling fans in my great room vaulted ceiling. I have also had a screen porch pavilion drawn by a local architect which will overlook an existing pond and swimming pool. My plan is to have this house as efficient as possible and livable in the event of a total grid collapse. I am a prepper but believe that this event as well as many discussed here have a small probability of occurrence, but believe in insurance. If nothing happens, even though these improvements although will not entirely pay for themselves, will decrease utility bills and more importantly give me added comfort and quality of LIFE! These improvements have been $60K so far but feel like by driving 2002 and 2004 paid for SUV's, I have saved this amount in car notes over the past four years by not needing that new car smell!
 
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