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Gitter Done!
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If you need some chocolate to calm that chocolate craving when the stores are empty, here are a few recipes to try out.

http://huffpost.com/us/entry/homemade-candy-bar-recipes_n_1711256.html

I tried the chocolate crunch bar using peanuts instead of rice crispies and liked it. I ate half the batch in one day, they are addictive.

I can see these as being a perfect trade item too.

Enjoy.
 

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Beer Truck Door Gunner
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Too many of the recipes start with chocolate instead of going further back to cocoa.

Chocolate doesn't last well for LTS, but cocoa does.

It would be better to have a recipe list where every recipe starts with plain cocoa powder and limits ingredients to that can be readily stored LTS.

Nuts would be out as they don't last long either. Though defatted nut powder is a possibility.

Nothing wrong with your intent here, but the execution could use some help if you want to call them survival recipes.

The Tootsie Roll recipe definitely earns a pass. Everything on the ingredient list for those can be stored LTS.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I just made another batch using cocoa powder, powdered sugar, powdered butter, coconut oil, and creamy peanut butter all mixed together.

2 cups powdered cocoa
Half cup powdered sugar
Quarter cup powdered butter
Quarter cup coconut oil
1 cup peanut butter

Heated in sauce pan mixing it with a little water till it was all mixed on low heat, once it got thick I put it on wax paper and let cool in spoon sized globs.

In the future I might add huckleberry jam ( a few teaspoons) for different flavor.

Pretty good.

That's all LTS.

Took only a few minutes to make.
 

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1 cup peanut butter.......

That's all LTS.
The date on a jar of store bought peanut butter isn't the best by date like on a can of corn. It is an expiration date when the unsaturated fats start going rancid and unhealthy for you.

Unless you were making your own peanut butter from defatted peanut flour and coconut oil then that peanut butter isn't LTS.

Again, not a brick wall stopping your plan, but needs adjustment to be truly LTS.


Btw, found a recipe for making dark chocolate from cocoa powder that may help the cause here.
http://allrecipes.com/recipe/236212/homemade-melt-in-your-mouth-dark-chocolate-paleo/

Just coconut oil, honey, vanilla extract, and cocoa powder. All LTS items.

Once you have dark chocolate made you can make milk chocolate if you like by warming the dark chocolate over a double boiler and adding a special homemade milk carefully to it. That milk would be reconstituted nonfat milk that has extra milk powder in it and some butter powder too, thus making a semi condensed whole milk to lighten the dark chocolate. This exercise may need some practice and experimentation to perfect, but the failures should still be tasty.
 

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ΙΧΘΥΣ
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Or this could be perfect for folks who live in Georgia and own a peanut farm. Your circumstances may vary.

Recipes looks delicious, OP!
 
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We love chocolate candy and I love cooking so thank you for the link.
However, it was said that Chocolate, as in chocolate chips, will not do well in LTS. Can someone tell me more? Even if vacuum sealed on top of the original bag?

Usmountains is saying that the "allrecipies.com" is the better way to store chocolate, right? I guess I'd better make up a bunch of chocolate chip cookies with what I have and learn how to make chocolate by itself.
Going off to get the recipe. Thanks.
 

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We love chocolate candy and I love cooking so thank you for the link.
However, it was said that Chocolate, as in chocolate chips, will not do well in LTS. Can someone tell me more? Even if vacuum sealed on top of the original bag?

Usmountains is saying that the "allrecipies.com" is the better way to store chocolate, right? I guess I'd better make up a bunch of chocolate chip cookies with what I have and learn how to make chocolate by itself.
Going off to get the recipe. Thanks.
Vacuum sealing isn't useful at all for long term storage of foods. No consumer grade vacuum, nor consumer grade container, can deal with the amount of vacuum needed to draw all the air out. Some air will remain and that means oxygen remains.

Consider trying that other link to make dark chocolate from cocoa powder. Cocoa powder is LTS viable.

Experimenting to make your own chocolate should be entertaining.
 

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Not knowing how long the LTS posted in this thread represents, I just wanted to add that I have successfully stored dark and milk chocolate chips, vacuum sealed in quart jars for 5 years. I stored in a cool, dry, dark area (windowless pantry) and I rotate them every 2 years or so. All I used was my Food Saver vac system. I've done the same with my cocoa powder and several spices. I can't speak to more than 5 years, but I've been happy with my choc chips within that time frame. I keep my home at 65-67 in winter and 80-82 in summer. I guess with a power outage, better temperature control might be a problem. A root cellar is always an option too. Hope this helps. :D
 

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Not knowing how long the LTS posted in this thread represents, I just wanted to add that I have successfully stored dark and milk chocolate chips, vacuum sealed in quart jars for 5 years. I stored in a cool, dry, dark area (windowless pantry) and I rotate them every 2 years or so. All I used was my Food Saver vac system. I've done the same with my cocoa powder and several spices. I can't speak to more than 5 years, but I've been happy with my choc chips within that time frame. I keep my home at 65-67 in winter and 80-82 in summer. I guess with a power outage, better temperature control might be a problem. A root cellar is always an option too. Hope this helps. :D
LTS varies according to food type. But it means getting the longest time possible for a certain product.

That said, nothing is LTS grade if it can't last 5 years or more.

So what you talk about is the cusp of LTS and might qualify in one respect it does not truly embrace the entirety because you have a different method to end up with the same thing but much further out.

This definition will work for standard usage at SB forums.
 
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Something just occurred to me I hadn't thought of before. Vacuuming something in a jar would leave a lot of air/O2 just because of the unused space. Whereas vacuuming down a bag would get a lot more air out.

Now Zeke is gonna say how regular plastic leaks air.

But how much and how fast??? I have vacuumed bags that are still tight after a long time, and if they do leak, the small mollacules like hydrogen would be the first to get in. That would relieve some of the suction pressure with harmless[to food] gasses.
 

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I meant to add that I have forgotten chips vac sealed in a mason jar for 5 years and it was just fine. I do try to rotate them every 2 years or so, but have been known to miss some a time or 2.
Sometimes "just fine" isn't something you can tell with your human senses.

If any unsaturated oils were used they will go rancid within a year. Most people can only detect late stage rancidity, long after the toxicity has started. Toxicity affects you differently than bacterial spoilage. You don't notice the damage by getting immediately sick.

You just shorten your lifespan from premature aging.

With foods where actual nutrition is important the other problem is nutrition damage due to oxidation, and again only rare people can actually tell the food has lost notable nutritional value.

Tastes fine, looks fine, or smells fine are not effective indicators of food safety and nutrition.

With chocolate chips this really isn't much of an issue because of low use and no need for nutrition from them, but as a standard applied to regular food your human senses are the worst thing to rely on.

There is no value to a consumer vacuum appliance in regards to storing foods LTS. Don't feel singled out. There are more members here who bought one before learning the truth than those who didn't. It basically a right of passage for a prepper to learn of this mistake after spending the money on one. You have plenty of company here on that.
 

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Point taken IAmZeke. I prefer to follow govt guidelines as to food preserving. I do know that there are plenty of foods that do well vac sealed in jars using home vac equipment. I've been storing foods for over 30 years. I appreciate your knowledge. :)
 

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Point taken IAmZeke. I prefer to follow govt guidelines as to food preserving. I do know that there are plenty of foods that do well vac sealed in jars using home vac equipment. I've been storing foods for over 30 years. I appreciate your knowledge. :)
The better guidelines are typically what the LTS food companies use themselves.

All the reputable LTS brands have gone to mylar and O2A's since Y2K.

So is the hershey's syrup in cans LTS?
It's factory canned with a boatload of sugar to preserve it. No fat either. I can't see how it could go bad short of the can busting open.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I used the cocoa powder in cans mixed with powdered sugar, both are about 7 years old and both batches of my chocolate peanut clusters were delicious.

The peanut butter cups turned out great as well.

I can't believe I ate them all. :)
 
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