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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently obtained a Mossberg 930 semiautomatic shotgun as a woods gun, but i'm also thinking of using it as my new home defense shotgun. Of course, the option was already there, but it needs more "stuff" to be a capable contender over my Mossberg 590 pump. I'm not saying I want to throw 20 lbs of attachments to "tacticalize" it, but definitely to make it more adequate of a "pacifier." I'll keep you guys posted, but please feel free to throw in ideas and present opinions.

The gun already has a breaching style muzzle break attached to the barrel. Honestly, I think it's more for glamour, but I hardly think it will hurt to keep it.

First off, I will definitely be getting a magazine extension. Currently, the tube is quite short, only being able to hold 4 shells + 1 in the chamber. Normally that would be fine, but I'd feel more comfortable with at least 6 or 7 in the gun. A LEO friend of mine said he would never use a shotgun for combat with a tube that cannot hold 5 shells on it's own. So i'm considering a Choate extension for $60, which would put the shell capacity at 6+1.

Next, I'd like to add a side saddle to hold shells. I'm not sure to the capacity, but I would think at least 5. That way, I can hold at least 12 shells on the shotgun at all times and make reloading quite a bit easier.

The sight on the shotgun is a tubular style bead, more of a peg, with a white dot painted on. My 590 has a pair of ghost rings, which I really like. The rings allow for more accurare firing, especially with slugs. I am considering a pair of rings for the 930, considering that I might still use it for hog, coyote, or deer hunting, or just a bush gun in general. I might choose to keep the peg, who knows. The only problem with getting the rings is the installation, trying to get them over the muzzle break may actually be impossible without custom work and cutting on the gun, which I might be unwilling to do.

Lastly, the stock and forearm. Any suggestions? I know most are advocates for the full stock, but my LEO friend has mentioned that a pistol grip with a stock is smaller and more maneuverable inside of houses, which would be a great advantage for it as a home defense weapon. I know that shotgun pistol grips sting the wrists and don't help recoil, but I'm sure that with practice, those problems can be overcome. Give me opinions and experiences on this subject especially.

Any thoughts? Run them at me! Again, I'll keep you posted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
For the side saddle installation, you lay the shotgun on its side with the ejection port facing up and push out the pins located above the trigger guard. You then turn over the shotgun, place the saddle, and insert and tighten the provided screws into the pin holes.

As far as training and ammo, I know. I still consider it important to make the firearm the most capable machine possible.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
How many home defense scenarios require more than half a dozen rounds of 12 gauge? One or two on target would take out Mr. 9mm rather quickly. If you're in a protracted fire fight with a shotgun, you're not in a home defense scenario unless you're re-enacting the Alamo. Too much add-on junk defeats the purpose of being fast and nimble with a HD shotgun.
Just saying, if I were to rob a house, I wouldn't do it alone.
To be a prepper means to be prepared. That could apply to defense against one assailant or many. You do you, brother. But I'm not going to risk the lives of my family on it. If you want to go into a fight with a handfull of rounds, be my guest.
 
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