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Great, but why start with shipping containers? Why not start with a conventional framed construction? Are the containers cheaper? It would seem everything else would be cheaper and easier starting with a framed construction, like windows, doors, flooring, running electrical, etc. The interior gets framed anyway... ???

A+ for creativity, but I've never understood the fascination with shipping containers. Not knocking it. I just don't get it personally.
 

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Excellent! I guess since they do it all the time when they are shipping and storing you could stack them for two stories and then weld them up?

Used containers start at about $2600.00 each or less. Can you frame up and put up exterior walls and ceiling for $6400 for a 1280 sqft home?
 

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Based on my rough calculations, materials list for making a 36 x 36 x 8 foot tall box, which is 1296 sq ft., assuming walls and floors on 16-inch centers and 2 load-bearing walls in the interior (one every 12 feet of ceiling span).

225 2x4's
250 2x6's
36 sheets of 4x8 plywood for the sides
80 sheets of 4x8 plywood for the ceiling and floor
Various nails, screws, construction adhesive, whatever.

Can stuff be purchased for the price of 2 shipping containers? I dunno.

Edit: Obviously you'd want to use 12' 2x6's instead of 8 footers, at least for the ceiling joists, but I did these calculations with 8 footers just because I'm not planning to actually make the box / house. This just gives an idea of the amount of materials involved that it would take to make such a structure, so a person can do some noodling about it.
 

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Hooligan on Holiday
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Great, but why start with shipping containers? Why not start with a conventional framed construction? Are the containers cheaper? It would seem everything else would be cheaper and easier starting with a framed construction, like windows, doors, flooring, running electrical, etc. The interior gets framed anyway... ???

A+ for creativity, but I've never understood the fascination with shipping containers. Not knocking it. I just don't get it personally.
Much stronger than your average stick build in sheer force winds and quakes. After all, they are stacked several high in rolling seas and survive so imagine your average framed home doing that.
 

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Based on my rough calculations, materials list for making a 36 x 36 x 8 foot tall box, which is 1296 sq ft., assuming walls and floors on 16-inch centers and 2 load-bearing walls in the interior (one every 12 feet of ceiling span).

225 2x4's
250 2x6's
36 sheets of 4x8 plywood for the sides
80 sheets of 4x8 plywood for the ceiling and floor
Various nails, screws, construction adhesive, whatever.

Can stuff be purchased for the price of 2 shipping containers? I dunno.
Also, don't forget your labor. I would imagine siting, leveling and welding the containers together probably took a shorter period of time than framing in the house, roof, papering and shingling the roof, and, doing the inside main walls would take. You forgot the roof for your frame house, this one comes with its own!
 

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I would love to have some land up north and do something like this. To bad I have no money, no land, and no know how =) but still awesome to check out and start studying up on the how to part.
 

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Awesome...Maybe add another level, or add a garage using the C-cans? As for the why do it? recycling. easy to build the basic structure. Step one buy a C-can. Step 2 Put it where you want it. Also relatively easy to transport to your selected location. One problem. What happens if you are in the giant metal can and it gets hit by lightning? Would you be fine as long as it was grounded properly?
 

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