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I have read countless articles and websites about the best guns, weapons, etc to keep around and was wondering what other everyone else really thinks not just a set list made by someone on the internet. I would enjoy recommendations to research and possibly try. also, accessories for the firearms, bows, whatever would be appreciated as well. I realize i'll have to go out and test these for myself though. Here it is:

Firearms (sorry i do not know exact models of each):
-Smith & Wesson 9mm Pistol
-Charter Arms .38 revolver (Stub nose)
-Smith & Wesson .38 revolver (6 inch barrel)
-Smith % Wesson .22 revolver (It is the same size as the .357 version that my uncle has. I believe it is some police model.)
-(x2) .22 bolt action rifle
- .25 bolt action rifle
- (x2) Remington 12 gauge shotguns
- Remington 20 gauge shotgun
- Break action 410 shotgun (unknown make)
-Winchester 30-30 lever action (with scope)
-Basic BB gun and pellet guns

Bows:
- PSE Stalker Recurve bow
- Go Primal Survival Bow (by far my favorite bow)
-Phoenix Compound bow (from the 90s, but equipped with everything)
-A youth recurve and compound from when I first started. If needed they are enough for very small critters.


Sharps:
This would take FOREVER to type up. I have countless folding and fixed blades. I have a few swords and machetes, 6 tomahawks and 3 axes, and other oddball sharps.

Others:
-Bamboo blowgun
-slingshot
 

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.22 lr

I believe (although others will argue this) this is one of the most important rifles to have.
Light, Ammo is light, easily carry 100s of rounds, cheap, quite in comparison, excellent for small game, etc
 

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I would not go too much on primitive means. Such as bows, blowguns, tomahawks ect.

A good knife, essential. A blowgun, not so much.

Dont get me wrong, they are fun. I enjoy my blowgun & bows & all my other weapons but I consider them for a collector of dangerous toys, not as an arsenal or anything for home defense. Not even really for hunting.

If I am going to drop an animal it is likely to be with a firearm. Only time I even drag out the bow is when it is bow hunting season & that is only because I am not allowed to hunt with a rifle.

If I am going for silent I am likely going to go for traps. Less work for me then stalking close enough to use anything other than a firearm.

As other noted, a 22lr is a good investment. It will handle all small game. For larger prey & including home defense, cant beat a good 12g pump shotgun. Very versatile.

That and maybe a pistol for walking around is nice. A scoped rifle is good if you have the land/ability to take game past 100yrds. Other than that, that is really all you need for a basic setup

A warning though, weapon collecting is addictive. I got more than enough & want more. Dont need em, just want em :)
 

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Is the list above the weapons you currently own? If so you have all your bases covered with hunting weapons from small game (22lr), large game (30-30), and fowl (12ga)..

What capacity is your 9mm smith. If it's a full size or compact weapon then it can be used as your main side arm for defense also the 38 6in.

If those are your current weapons I would get ammo for all in large quantities and a Battle rifle of some kind. I like a AR or AK ask around and you will find someone who is in your area that would be happy to spend a day at the range. Same goes for a M1A, FAL, or even a H&K. The one that fits you and feels the best to you is the right one.

Best of luck and I think your off to a great start.
 

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despite what many magazines say theres no need for dozens of guns. what worked for the pioneers will work for you.

high capacity repeating rifle with low recoil, was a pistol lever rifle but now is a semi auto centerfire.
shotgun for self defense and game animals.
rimfire is a must for game
large caliber centerfire is very nice to have if your in an area with lots of large animals to eat.
handgun ? depends on how often you go "town" so to speak. would keep you safer until you got back to your horse and grabbed your rifle.
 

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If the list is of weapons you currently own, I think you'll find that during a SHTF moment, you're only going to find use out of 2 or 3 guns, that's the maximum number I see anyone carrying anyways.
 

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Not sure if you're asking for suggestions as to what to get next, if anything but I would recommend a hunting rifle chambered in .30-06. or .308 and a modern repeating rifle that takes hi-cap mags. The 30-30 is decent out to about 200yds but does not have the knockdown power or ballistics that I would want past that.

As for the other weapons I would buy a lot more arrows. They will be the limiting factor in your bows working. I think bows will be a very under prepped item in terms of a true SHTF because they are silent. You don't have to worry about others tracking you down due to a gun shot report.
 

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I think you're listing what you own, right? It depends on the situation and on your environment exactly what you might need. The two things you don't have that are very useful in common situations are 1) a full-power scoped rifle, such as a .308 or .30-06 bolt rifle, and 2) an intermediate cartridge carbine, such as an AR-15.

Will you need them? Who knows? In most situations, you'd probably do fine with your .30-30, .38 Special revolver, 12ga and the .22s.
 

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My thoughts on a weapons battery and why:


1. Main Battle Rifle (MBR) - .308 in a folding stock PTR-91. .308 because it will do just about everything the M-16/M-4, AK-47/74, and SKS platforms in 5.56, 7.62x39, 5.45x39 will, just not quite as well for a couple of things, plus it can do things those platforms and cartridges can’t. Can also hunt most North American big game, and small game with .32 ACP adapters. PTR-91 because it is somewhat cheaper than the competitors and the magazines (right now, anyway) are only $2 - $6 for good used alloy ones. Next choice is M1A, but it is more expensive all the way around. Minimum of 3 load outs of magazines, dependent on your LBE. 1,000 rounds per gun.

Many will say you don't need an MBR round in urban areas because of ranges. I disagree. There are long open stretches along streets, and if the attackers have long range weapons and you don't, you are pretty much out of luck and can be harassed until the attackers get close enough to take you out. Plus the penetration is much better with .308 for those that think they are under cover when it is only concealment to the .308.

Why no light combat rifle? (M-16/M-4 types, AK-47/74 types, and SKS platforms in 7.62x39, 6.8, 6.5, 5.56, 5.45x39) They tend to be lighter than MBRs, but only somewhat for some of them. Others are quite a bit lighter, as is the ammunition. One can carry more ammunition, yes. But it is not as effective as .308 by a long shot. Doesn’t have the range, when needed, of the .308. And though one can carry more ammunition with the lighter calibers, it boils down to how many targets can you successfully engage with that ammunition load? Where it often takes 2, 3, 4, or more rounds of 5.56 to successfully engage and put down an attacker due to cover, body armor, deflection of the round, and several other reasons, 1 or 2, occasionally 3 rounds of .308 is likely to take down that same adversary. 210 rounds standard load, divided by 3 is 70 targets engaged. 180 rounds (my standard load of .308 for the PTR-91) divided by 2 is 90 targets engaged. Now, there are a tremendous number of variables when it comes to targets engaged. But in aimed, controlled fire, I think the .308 has the lead. In spray and pray, or heavy suppressive fire, the 5.56 et al probably do.

2. Primary self defense handgun - .45 ACP in Glock 21SF. .45 ACP because it will get the job done quiet effectively with reliable FMJ rounds with moderate recoil in a practical size. Readily available ammunition. Glock 21SF for magazine capacity in .45 ACP and low cost. Next choice is ParaOrdnance P-14, but it is more expensive all the way around. 12 magazines. Minimum of 500 rounds.

3. Dual purpose shotgun – 12 gauge in Remington 11-87 26” barrel w/Poly-choke and various tactical accessories. 12 gauge because of readily available ammunition, it is most effective in most situations including hunting. 11-87 because it is semi-auto which helps reduce recoil, can use many different loads due to the gas system (26” barrels up only. Short barrels don’t have the gas compensation system), and is faster on follow-up aimed shots than pumps for most people. Next choice is the same gun w/o the tactical additions. Minimum of 500 rounds mixed 00 buck/slugs, 500 rounds mixed hunting rounds.

4. Sniping/hunting gun – Remington 700 .30-’06 with Bushnell Elite 4200 2.5-10 x 40mm. .30-’06 will take all but the largest most dangerous game at long range. Adequate sniping weapon at ranges up to ~600 yards. Availability of ammunition. Can use .32 ACP and/or .30 Carbine for small game very quietly with chamber adapter. Why .30-’06 instead of .308? Because it gives two calibers, both of which are acceptable hunting and defense calibers. Ammunition for hunting would be purchased for either weapon, so you would have the same number of rounds in either case. 5 magazines, 400 rounds sniping rounds, 400 rounds mixed hunting rounds.

5. Hideout handgun - .32 ACP in Beretta Tomcat. .32 ACP because it is useable in .30 caliber rifles as a small game load with the use of chamber adapters. Minimum power for self defense in semi-auto pistols. Tomcat because of its small size, quality, and price. 9 magazines. 250 defensive rounds, 250 for hunting in the .30-'06.

6. Secondary self defense handgun - .45 ACP in Glock 30SF. Slightly smaller package that will take 9 & 10 round magazines for better concealment plus Model 21 13-round magazines. Next Choice is ParaOrdnance P-10 Warthog, but it is more expensive all the way around. 2 9-round, 4 10-round, 6 additional 21 SF 13-round magazines. Additional 250 rounds ammunition.

7. Dangerous/large game/light anti-materiel rifle - .375 H&H Magnum in Remington 700 bolt action. .375 H&H magnum for availability, and proven record on big, dangerous game. Moderately effective anti-material round. Better dual purpose round than smaller rounds and the bigger magnums because of recoil, availability, and cost. Remington 700 because of price and the fact that it is repeater, which is important in big/dangerous game and anti-material use. 5 magazines. 400 rounds anti-material rounds, 200 hunting rounds.

9. Hand-out gun(s) – Auto Ordnance.30 Carbine in M1 Carbine. .30 Carbine because it is small and light, works in a small frame box magazine semi-auto gun, has ballistics at 200 yards slightly better than .357 Magnum at the muzzle. M1 Carbine because it is light, handy, easy to handle, and more accurate in unskilled hands than a full power handgun or rifle. Also not too expensive for the carbines, magazines, and ammunition. 30 15-round magazines per gun, 1,000 rounds defensive rounds per gun, 200 hunting rounds for the .30-'06

10. Personal Defense Weapon (PDR) – PDR for primarily non-combatants. Same as the hand-out gun for all the same reasons. Small enough and light enough to keep slung when doing many tasks, unlike full power weapons. Pistols are ‘handier’ in that they are smaller and lighter, but inexperienced shooters seem to handle a light carbine more effectively than a pistol. 30 15-round magazines per gun, 1,000 rounds defensive rounds per gun.

11. Get-home-bag/trunk gun – Again the .30 Carbine, this time with a folding stock. For most of the same reasons above. There are guns that compact as much or more than a folding stock .30 Carbine, but most have a much larger profile and the gun and ammunition are heavier and bulkier. Some that seem ideal I don’t trust to be reliable. (Not a BOB or GOOD or INCH bag – they call for an MBR in my opinion) 30 15-round magazines per gun, 1,000 rounds defensive rounds per gun.

12. Long Ranger sniper/anti-material rifle – Vigilance VR-1 .408 Cheytac because of its effectiveness at long ranges for both anti-personnel and anti-materiel sniping. VR-1 because it’s light for the caliber (18#), semi-auto. .408 Cheytac due to its effectiveness compared to the .50 BMG and .416 Barrett, and the fact that it is available in lighter and easier to handle weapons. Very expensive. 5 magazines. 600 rounds of ammunition

Why no .22 LR or other rimfires – Simply because they cannot be reloaded. When you’re out of ammunition, you are out of ammunition. They are so common that finding one post-disaster shouldn’t be much of a problem. Same with the ammunition early on, and then, when it’s all gone, they aren’t useable. For hunting, using a .32 ACP chamber adapter in a .308 or .30-’06 bolt action rifle provides for near silent small game hunting. The .30 M1 Carbines can do pretty much substitute for a .22 rim fire rifle or carbine will do and the rounds are reloadable.

13. Black powder cartridge arms - .45-70 in Marlin 1895, .45 Colt in Ruger New Model Blackhawk Convertible, .32-20 in Ruger Blackhawk & Marlin 1894 rifle. .45-70 because it is the most plentiful of the big bore black powder cartridges is powerful enough for any American big game at short ranges. Marlin because of quality. .45 Colt because it is the most common powerful black powder hand gun cartridge easily available. Ruger for the same reason as the Marlin. .32-20 because it is a better small game cartridge than the .45-70 or .45 Colt, and available in Ruger and Marlin firearms. 1,000 rounds each caliber each gun.

14. Blackpowder muzzle loaders - .58 caliber flintlock rifle, .58 caliber flintlock handgun (x3), .32 flintlock rifle, 12 gauge flintlock shotgun. Flintlock because black powder, including ffff for priming, can be made, and bullets cast from scrap lead. .58 caliber rifle and pistol for bullet interchangeability. Any good quality brand for availability, quality, and cost. .32 for small game, 12 gauge for maximum power. Loading supplies for 1,000 shots each caliber for each gun.

15. Archery weapons – When quiet is needed and there are no suppressors for the firearms, archery weapons come into their own. While the high tech ones have some of the same disadvantages of firearms, such as available ammunition (arrows, points, nocks, shafts, and fletching) more primitive designs can be home made and can be effective enough to hunt with and even for defense in some cases.
Bear Carnage Compound Bow using Easton ST Axis Full Metal Jacket Dangerous Game arrows with MUZZY 4 blade broad heads 145gr regular compound bow or a Barnett Predator AVI compound Crossbow using Easton XX75 bolts with MUZZY 4 blade broadhead 145gr for a compound cross bow.

16. Expedient weapons/defenses:
Here creativity becomes the watch word. Most things can be used as a weapon, many that are innocuous enough to not get you in trouble if you carry them. A good hiking staff or walking stick, to a roll of dimes in a fist, to keys held through the fingers, and on and on and on. Any search on the internet for expedient weapons will find all kinds of examples. One particular one that I like isn’t an offensive weapon. It is pretty much defensive. That is a small, lightly weighted throw net. It can be carried in a pocket ready to deploy, or even in the hand, and with a flick of the arm and wrist, (after lots of practice) it can entangle an aggressor enough, for long enough, to do harm to them if required, or two get away.


17. Sharps:
Every Day Carry - City:
Leatherman or Cold Steel folding pocket knife
Gentleman’s Swiss Army Knife

Every Day Carry – Field (in addition to the above):
Leatherman Surge Multi-tool
Wenger Survivor or Victorinox Rucksack SAK
Spyderco C08 Harpy one hand opening serrated hawk blade ‘get out of trouble’ folder kept clipped where it is easy one hand access for emergency use.

Concurrent to the first 5 weapons:
Edged weapons:
Ontario Knife OKC-3S bayonet (for PTR-91 & Remington 11-87)(Yes, they will fit with the adapters I have) (Have)
Cold Steel Oda field knife (Have 2)
Cold Steel Rifleman’s tomahawk (Have)
Cold Steel 24” Latin machete (Have)

Concurrent with the Black powder cartridge arms.
Cold Steel 1860 heavy cavalry saber (want)
Cold Steel Natchez Bowie Knife (want)

Just my opinion.
 

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My thoughts on a weapons battery and why:


1. Main Battle Rifle (MBR) - .308 in a folding stock PTR-91. .308 because it will do just about everything the M-16/M-4, AK-47/74, and SKS platforms in 5.56, 7.62x39, 5.45x39 will, just not quite as well for a couple of things, plus it can do things those platforms and cartridges can’t. Can also hunt most North American big game, and small game with .32 ACP adapters. PTR-91 because it is somewhat cheaper than the competitors and the magazines (right now, anyway) are only $2 - $6 for good used alloy ones. Next choice is M1A, but it is more expensive all the way around. Minimum of 3 load outs of magazines, dependent on your LBE. 1,000 rounds per gun.

Many will say you don't need an MBR round in urban areas because of ranges. I disagree. There are long open stretches along streets, and if the attackers have long range weapons and you don't, you are pretty much out of luck and can be harassed until the attackers get close enough to take you out. Plus the penetration is much better with .308 for those that think they are under cover when it is only concealment to the .308.

Why no light combat rifle? (M-16/M-4 types, AK-47/74 types, and SKS platforms in 7.62x39, 6.8, 6.5, 5.56, 5.45x39) They tend to be lighter than MBRs, but only somewhat for some of them. Others are quite a bit lighter, as is the ammunition. One can carry more ammunition, yes. But it is not as effective as .308 by a long shot. Doesn’t have the range, when needed, of the .308. And though one can carry more ammunition with the lighter calibers, it boils down to how many targets can you successfully engage with that ammunition load? Where it often takes 2, 3, 4, or more rounds of 5.56 to successfully engage and put down an attacker due to cover, body armor, deflection of the round, and several other reasons, 1 or 2, occasionally 3 rounds of .308 is likely to take down that same adversary. 210 rounds standard load, divided by 3 is 70 targets engaged. 180 rounds (my standard load of .308 for the PTR-91) divided by 2 is 90 targets engaged. Now, there are a tremendous number of variables when it comes to targets engaged. But in aimed, controlled fire, I think the .308 has the lead. In spray and pray, or heavy suppressive fire, the 5.56 et al probably do.

2. Primary self defense handgun - .45 ACP in Glock 21SF. .45 ACP because it will get the job done quiet effectively with reliable FMJ rounds with moderate recoil in a practical size. Readily available ammunition. Glock 21SF for magazine capacity in .45 ACP and low cost. Next choice is ParaOrdnance P-14, but it is more expensive all the way around. 12 magazines. Minimum of 500 rounds.

3. Dual purpose shotgun – 12 gauge in Remington 11-87 26” barrel w/Poly-choke and various tactical accessories. 12 gauge because of readily available ammunition, it is most effective in most situations including hunting. 11-87 because it is semi-auto which helps reduce recoil, can use many different loads due to the gas system (26” barrels up only. Short barrels don’t have the gas compensation system), and is faster on follow-up aimed shots than pumps for most people. Next choice is the same gun w/o the tactical additions. Minimum of 500 rounds mixed 00 buck/slugs, 500 rounds mixed hunting rounds.

4. Sniping/hunting gun – Remington 700 .30-’06 with Bushnell Elite 4200 2.5-10 x 40mm. .30-’06 will take all but the largest most dangerous game at long range. Adequate sniping weapon at ranges up to ~600 yards. Availability of ammunition. Can use .32 ACP and/or .30 Carbine for small game very quietly with chamber adapter. Why .30-’06 instead of .308? Because it gives two calibers, both of which are acceptable hunting and defense calibers. Ammunition for hunting would be purchased for either weapon, so you would have the same number of rounds in either case. 5 magazines, 400 rounds sniping rounds, 400 rounds mixed hunting rounds.

5. Hideout handgun - .32 ACP in Beretta Tomcat. .32 ACP because it is useable in .30 caliber rifles as a small game load with the use of chamber adapters. Minimum power for self defense in semi-auto pistols. Tomcat because of its small size, quality, and price. 9 magazines. 250 defensive rounds, 250 for hunting in the .30-'06.

6. Secondary self defense handgun - .45 ACP in Glock 30SF. Slightly smaller package that will take 9 & 10 round magazines for better concealment plus Model 21 13-round magazines. Next Choice is ParaOrdnance P-10 Warthog, but it is more expensive all the way around. 2 9-round, 4 10-round, 6 additional 21 SF 13-round magazines. Additional 250 rounds ammunition.

7. Dangerous/large game/light anti-materiel rifle - .375 H&H Magnum in Remington 700 bolt action. .375 H&H magnum for availability, and proven record on big, dangerous game. Moderately effective anti-material round. Better dual purpose round than smaller rounds and the bigger magnums because of recoil, availability, and cost. Remington 700 because of price and the fact that it is repeater, which is important in big/dangerous game and anti-material use. 5 magazines. 400 rounds anti-material rounds, 200 hunting rounds.

9. Hand-out gun(s) – Auto Ordnance.30 Carbine in M1 Carbine. .30 Carbine because it is small and light, works in a small frame box magazine semi-auto gun, has ballistics at 200 yards slightly better than .357 Magnum at the muzzle. M1 Carbine because it is light, handy, easy to handle, and more accurate in unskilled hands than a full power handgun or rifle. Also not too expensive for the carbines, magazines, and ammunition. 30 15-round magazines per gun, 1,000 rounds defensive rounds per gun, 200 hunting rounds for the .30-'06

10. Personal Defense Weapon (PDR) – PDR for primarily non-combatants. Same as the hand-out gun for all the same reasons. Small enough and light enough to keep slung when doing many tasks, unlike full power weapons. Pistols are ‘handier’ in that they are smaller and lighter, but inexperienced shooters seem to handle a light carbine more effectively than a pistol. 30 15-round magazines per gun, 1,000 rounds defensive rounds per gun.

11. Get-home-bag/trunk gun – Again the .30 Carbine, this time with a folding stock. For most of the same reasons above. There are guns that compact as much or more than a folding stock .30 Carbine, but most have a much larger profile and the gun and ammunition are heavier and bulkier. Some that seem ideal I don’t trust to be reliable. (Not a BOB or GOOD or INCH bag – they call for an MBR in my opinion) 30 15-round magazines per gun, 1,000 rounds defensive rounds per gun.

12. Long Ranger sniper/anti-material rifle – Vigilance VR-1 .408 Cheytac because of its effectiveness at long ranges for both anti-personnel and anti-materiel sniping. VR-1 because it’s light for the caliber (18#), semi-auto. .408 Cheytac due to its effectiveness compared to the .50 BMG and .416 Barrett, and the fact that it is available in lighter and easier to handle weapons. Very expensive. 5 magazines. 600 rounds of ammunition

Why no .22 LR or other rimfires – Simply because they cannot be reloaded. When you’re out of ammunition, you are out of ammunition. They are so common that finding one post-disaster shouldn’t be much of a problem. Same with the ammunition early on, and then, when it’s all gone, they aren’t useable. For hunting, using a .32 ACP chamber adapter in a .308 or .30-’06 bolt action rifle provides for near silent small game hunting. The .30 M1 Carbines can do pretty much substitute for a .22 rim fire rifle or carbine will do and the rounds are reloadable.

13. Black powder cartridge arms - .45-70 in Marlin 1895, .45 Colt in Ruger New Model Blackhawk Convertible, .32-20 in Ruger Blackhawk & Marlin 1894 rifle. .45-70 because it is the most plentiful of the big bore black powder cartridges is powerful enough for any American big game at short ranges. Marlin because of quality. .45 Colt because it is the most common powerful black powder hand gun cartridge easily available. Ruger for the same reason as the Marlin. .32-20 because it is a better small game cartridge than the .45-70 or .45 Colt, and available in Ruger and Marlin firearms. 1,000 rounds each caliber each gun.

14. Blackpowder muzzle loaders - .58 caliber flintlock rifle, .58 caliber flintlock handgun (x3), .32 flintlock rifle, 12 gauge flintlock shotgun. Flintlock because black powder, including ffff for priming, can be made, and bullets cast from scrap lead. .58 caliber rifle and pistol for bullet interchangeability. Any good quality brand for availability, quality, and cost. .32 for small game, 12 gauge for maximum power. Loading supplies for 1,000 shots each caliber for each gun.

15. Archery weapons – When quiet is needed and there are no suppressors for the firearms, archery weapons come into their own. While the high tech ones have some of the same disadvantages of firearms, such as available ammunition (arrows, points, nocks, shafts, and fletching) more primitive designs can be home made and can be effective enough to hunt with and even for defense in some cases.
Bear Carnage Compound Bow using Easton ST Axis Full Metal Jacket Dangerous Game arrows with MUZZY 4 blade broad heads 145gr regular compound bow or a Barnett Predator AVI compound Crossbow using Easton XX75 bolts with MUZZY 4 blade broadhead 145gr for a compound cross bow.

16. Expedient weapons/defenses:
Here creativity becomes the watch word. Most things can be used as a weapon, many that are innocuous enough to not get you in trouble if you carry them. A good hiking staff or walking stick, to a roll of dimes in a fist, to keys held through the fingers, and on and on and on. Any search on the internet for expedient weapons will find all kinds of examples. One particular one that I like isn’t an offensive weapon. It is pretty much defensive. That is a small, lightly weighted throw net. It can be carried in a pocket ready to deploy, or even in the hand, and with a flick of the arm and wrist, (after lots of practice) it can entangle an aggressor enough, for long enough, to do harm to them if required, or two get away.


17. Sharps:
Every Day Carry - City:
Leatherman or Cold Steel folding pocket knife
Gentleman’s Swiss Army Knife

Every Day Carry – Field (in addition to the above):
Leatherman Surge Multi-tool
Wenger Survivor or Victorinox Rucksack SAK
Spyderco C08 Harpy one hand opening serrated hawk blade ‘get out of trouble’ folder kept clipped where it is easy one hand access for emergency use.

Concurrent to the first 5 weapons:
Edged weapons:
Ontario Knife OKC-3S bayonet (for PTR-91 & Remington 11-87)(Yes, they will fit with the adapters I have) (Have)
Cold Steel Oda field knife (Have 2)
Cold Steel Rifleman’s tomahawk (Have)
Cold Steel 24” Latin machete (Have)

Concurrent with the Black powder cartridge arms.
Cold Steel 1860 heavy cavalry saber (want)
Cold Steel Natchez Bowie Knife (want)

Just my opinion.
You forgot the phased plasma rifle, in the 40 watt range.
 

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I have a Smith and Wesson M&P 9C. I little bigger than the Shield so it can have more rounds but not as big as a full size so I can still conceal it.
I have a Smith and Wesson M&P 22 which is pretty close to the 9c in dimensions and handling.
Then my AR7 for small game and an old H&R rifle/shotgun combo which youth sized to cut down on weight.
If things really get bad my grate grandfathers muzzleloader.
 

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For this & all those "what one gun" threads I constantly read.

Double barreled 12G. a slug will take big game & shot will handle everything else. They even make adapters for common calibers to shoot a variety of bullets.

If i had nothing else, That is what I would want with me 24/7.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
For this & all those "what one gun" threads I constantly read.

Double barreled 12G. a slug will take big game & shot will handle everything else. They even make adapters for common calibers to shoot a variety of bullets.

If i had nothing else, That is what I would want with me 24/7.
Sadly the only break action I have is a 410 and it would only be able to take a .22 adapter. I have been looking into a 12 gauge for a while.
 

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My thoughts on a weapons battery and why:


1. Main Battle Rifle (MBR) - .308 in a folding stock PTR-91. .308 because it will do just about everything the M-16/M-4, AK-47/74, and SKS platforms in 5.56, 7.62x39, 5.45x39 will, just not quite as well for a couple of things, plus it can do things those platforms and cartridges can’t. Can also hunt most North American big game, and small game with .32 ACP adapters. PTR-91 because it is somewhat cheaper than the competitors and the magazines (right now, anyway) are only $2 - $6 for good used alloy ones. Next choice is M1A, but it is more expensive all the way around. Minimum of 3 load outs of magazines, dependent on your LBE. 1,000 rounds per gun.

Many will say you don't need an MBR round in urban areas because of ranges. I disagree. There are long open stretches along streets, and if the attackers have long range weapons and you don't, you are pretty much out of luck and can be harassed until the attackers get close enough to take you out. Plus the penetration is much better with .308 for those that think they are under cover when it is only concealment to the .308.

Why no light combat rifle? (M-16/M-4 types, AK-47/74 types, and SKS platforms in 7.62x39, 6.8, 6.5, 5.56, 5.45x39) They tend to be lighter than MBRs, but only somewhat for some of them. Others are quite a bit lighter, as is the ammunition. One can carry more ammunition, yes. But it is not as effective as .308 by a long shot. Doesn’t have the range, when needed, of the .308. And though one can carry more ammunition with the lighter calibers, it boils down to how many targets can you successfully engage with that ammunition load? Where it often takes 2, 3, 4, or more rounds of 5.56 to successfully engage and put down an attacker due to cover, body armor, deflection of the round, and several other reasons, 1 or 2, occasionally 3 rounds of .308 is likely to take down that same adversary. 210 rounds standard load, divided by 3 is 70 targets engaged. 180 rounds (my standard load of .308 for the PTR-91) divided by 2 is 90 targets engaged. Now, there are a tremendous number of variables when it comes to targets engaged. But in aimed, controlled fire, I think the .308 has the lead. In spray and pray, or heavy suppressive fire, the 5.56 et al probably do.

2. Primary self defense handgun - .45 ACP in Glock 21SF. .45 ACP because it will get the job done quiet effectively with reliable FMJ rounds with moderate recoil in a practical size. Readily available ammunition. Glock 21SF for magazine capacity in .45 ACP and low cost. Next choice is ParaOrdnance P-14, but it is more expensive all the way around. 12 magazines. Minimum of 500 rounds.

3. Dual purpose shotgun – 12 gauge in Remington 11-87 26” barrel w/Poly-choke and various tactical accessories. 12 gauge because of readily available ammunition, it is most effective in most situations including hunting. 11-87 because it is semi-auto which helps reduce recoil, can use many different loads due to the gas system (26” barrels up only. Short barrels don’t have the gas compensation system), and is faster on follow-up aimed shots than pumps for most people. Next choice is the same gun w/o the tactical additions. Minimum of 500 rounds mixed 00 buck/slugs, 500 rounds mixed hunting rounds.

4. Sniping/hunting gun – Remington 700 .30-’06 with Bushnell Elite 4200 2.5-10 x 40mm. .30-’06 will take all but the largest most dangerous game at long range. Adequate sniping weapon at ranges up to ~600 yards. Availability of ammunition. Can use .32 ACP and/or .30 Carbine for small game very quietly with chamber adapter. Why .30-’06 instead of .308? Because it gives two calibers, both of which are acceptable hunting and defense calibers. Ammunition for hunting would be purchased for either weapon, so you would have the same number of rounds in either case. 5 magazines, 400 rounds sniping rounds, 400 rounds mixed hunting rounds.

5. Hideout handgun - .32 ACP in Beretta Tomcat. .32 ACP because it is useable in .30 caliber rifles as a small game load with the use of chamber adapters. Minimum power for self defense in semi-auto pistols. Tomcat because of its small size, quality, and price. 9 magazines. 250 defensive rounds, 250 for hunting in the .30-'06.

6. Secondary self defense handgun - .45 ACP in Glock 30SF. Slightly smaller package that will take 9 & 10 round magazines for better concealment plus Model 21 13-round magazines. Next Choice is ParaOrdnance P-10 Warthog, but it is more expensive all the way around. 2 9-round, 4 10-round, 6 additional 21 SF 13-round magazines. Additional 250 rounds ammunition.

7. Dangerous/large game/light anti-materiel rifle - .375 H&H Magnum in Remington 700 bolt action. .375 H&H magnum for availability, and proven record on big, dangerous game. Moderately effective anti-material round. Better dual purpose round than smaller rounds and the bigger magnums because of recoil, availability, and cost. Remington 700 because of price and the fact that it is repeater, which is important in big/dangerous game and anti-material use. 5 magazines. 400 rounds anti-material rounds, 200 hunting rounds.

9. Hand-out gun(s) – Auto Ordnance.30 Carbine in M1 Carbine. .30 Carbine because it is small and light, works in a small frame box magazine semi-auto gun, has ballistics at 200 yards slightly better than .357 Magnum at the muzzle. M1 Carbine because it is light, handy, easy to handle, and more accurate in unskilled hands than a full power handgun or rifle. Also not too expensive for the carbines, magazines, and ammunition. 30 15-round magazines per gun, 1,000 rounds defensive rounds per gun, 200 hunting rounds for the .30-'06

10. Personal Defense Weapon (PDR) – PDR for primarily non-combatants. Same as the hand-out gun for all the same reasons. Small enough and light enough to keep slung when doing many tasks, unlike full power weapons. Pistols are ‘handier’ in that they are smaller and lighter, but inexperienced shooters seem to handle a light carbine more effectively than a pistol. 30 15-round magazines per gun, 1,000 rounds defensive rounds per gun.

11. Get-home-bag/trunk gun – Again the .30 Carbine, this time with a folding stock. For most of the same reasons above. There are guns that compact as much or more than a folding stock .30 Carbine, but most have a much larger profile and the gun and ammunition are heavier and bulkier. Some that seem ideal I don’t trust to be reliable. (Not a BOB or GOOD or INCH bag – they call for an MBR in my opinion) 30 15-round magazines per gun, 1,000 rounds defensive rounds per gun.

12. Long Ranger sniper/anti-material rifle – Vigilance VR-1 .408 Cheytac because of its effectiveness at long ranges for both anti-personnel and anti-materiel sniping. VR-1 because it’s light for the caliber (18#), semi-auto. .408 Cheytac due to its effectiveness compared to the .50 BMG and .416 Barrett, and the fact that it is available in lighter and easier to handle weapons. Very expensive. 5 magazines. 600 rounds of ammunition

Why no .22 LR or other rimfires – Simply because they cannot be reloaded. When you’re out of ammunition, you are out of ammunition. They are so common that finding one post-disaster shouldn’t be much of a problem. Same with the ammunition early on, and then, when it’s all gone, they aren’t useable. For hunting, using a .32 ACP chamber adapter in a .308 or .30-’06 bolt action rifle provides for near silent small game hunting. The .30 M1 Carbines can do pretty much substitute for a .22 rim fire rifle or carbine will do and the rounds are reloadable.

13. Black powder cartridge arms - .45-70 in Marlin 1895, .45 Colt in Ruger New Model Blackhawk Convertible, .32-20 in Ruger Blackhawk & Marlin 1894 rifle. .45-70 because it is the most plentiful of the big bore black powder cartridges is powerful enough for any American big game at short ranges. Marlin because of quality. .45 Colt because it is the most common powerful black powder hand gun cartridge easily available. Ruger for the same reason as the Marlin. .32-20 because it is a better small game cartridge than the .45-70 or .45 Colt, and available in Ruger and Marlin firearms. 1,000 rounds each caliber each gun.

14. Blackpowder muzzle loaders - .58 caliber flintlock rifle, .58 caliber flintlock handgun (x3), .32 flintlock rifle, 12 gauge flintlock shotgun. Flintlock because black powder, including ffff for priming, can be made, and bullets cast from scrap lead. .58 caliber rifle and pistol for bullet interchangeability. Any good quality brand for availability, quality, and cost. .32 for small game, 12 gauge for maximum power. Loading supplies for 1,000 shots each caliber for each gun.

15. Archery weapons – When quiet is needed and there are no suppressors for the firearms, archery weapons come into their own. While the high tech ones have some of the same disadvantages of firearms, such as available ammunition (arrows, points, nocks, shafts, and fletching) more primitive designs can be home made and can be effective enough to hunt with and even for defense in some cases.
Bear Carnage Compound Bow using Easton ST Axis Full Metal Jacket Dangerous Game arrows with MUZZY 4 blade broad heads 145gr regular compound bow or a Barnett Predator AVI compound Crossbow using Easton XX75 bolts with MUZZY 4 blade broadhead 145gr for a compound cross bow.

16. Expedient weapons/defenses:
Here creativity becomes the watch word. Most things can be used as a weapon, many that are innocuous enough to not get you in trouble if you carry them. A good hiking staff or walking stick, to a roll of dimes in a fist, to keys held through the fingers, and on and on and on. Any search on the internet for expedient weapons will find all kinds of examples. One particular one that I like isn’t an offensive weapon. It is pretty much defensive. That is a small, lightly weighted throw net. It can be carried in a pocket ready to deploy, or even in the hand, and with a flick of the arm and wrist, (after lots of practice) it can entangle an aggressor enough, for long enough, to do harm to them if required, or two get away.


17. Sharps:
Every Day Carry - City:
Leatherman or Cold Steel folding pocket knife
Gentleman’s Swiss Army Knife

Every Day Carry – Field (in addition to the above):
Leatherman Surge Multi-tool
Wenger Survivor or Victorinox Rucksack SAK
Spyderco C08 Harpy one hand opening serrated hawk blade ‘get out of trouble’ folder kept clipped where it is easy one hand access for emergency use.

Concurrent to the first 5 weapons:
Edged weapons:
Ontario Knife OKC-3S bayonet (for PTR-91 & Remington 11-87)(Yes, they will fit with the adapters I have) (Have)
Cold Steel Oda field knife (Have 2)
Cold Steel Rifleman’s tomahawk (Have)
Cold Steel 24” Latin machete (Have)

Concurrent with the Black powder cartridge arms.
Cold Steel 1860 heavy cavalry saber (want)
Cold Steel Natchez Bowie Knife (want)

Just my opinion.
my grandfather supplied 50% of our meat with a meager assortment (the other half was raised) and protected all of us with the same.
he had two .22lr
a .410
a .12
a 30-30
and a .38 handgun.

how ever did we survive.
 
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