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No Ambulance For You
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Normally I have the answers to all types of outdoors questions my co-workers have but I'm not sure about the removal of HOG HAIR. I researched it quickly last night and saw that you can boil water in a metal drum that slightly slanted for approx 4-6 minutes with water temp of 140 degrees. But I suggested that she could burn the hair off. Does anyone have any suggestions?​
 

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Freedom Is Not Free
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A lot of butchers will have a scald tank to dip them and then scrape the skin. We've used a propane torch to remove stubborn feathers and fuzz from water fowl, or hair off of a deer. No ill effects on either one. I would think the same would go for a hog. BURN IT!
 

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Come and Take It!
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Whats the point of hair removal over just skinning? I don't know so someone please educate me.
If you have never had whole hog slow cooked for hours then it would be difficult to get the picture. Another reason is to cure the meat it is beneficial to have the skin on the hog. If youhave ever had a smokehouse cured ham, or smoke cured bacon you would see the skin aids in the curing process. There are many reasons to scald and scrape the hair off the hog.

Have you heard the expression that you use everything from the hog except the squeel? Well this is one of the reasons.
 

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I've never scolded a whole pig, mainly because;
1) I've never been hunting/camping with enough people to actually eat a whole pig, and
2) I've never had a big enough pot to do a whole pig (although I've seen in done in half a 44 Gal drum (cut lengthways) on a stand.

It takes a lot of water to boil...and a lot of fetid water to get rid of which is a problem if you do it close to camp. It also takes a bit of muscle and dextrity and help to avoid scolding yourself while turning a whole carcass in boiling water.

I've just done the quarters in a much smaller pot a short distance away from camp. :)
 

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I have heard of people laying the pig on a pallet, pouring the boiling water over the pig and scraping one side and then the other. I have also heard that canning jar lids make good scrapers.
 

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If you have never had whole hog slow cooked for hours then it would be difficult to get the picture. Another reason is to cure the meat it is beneficial to have the skin on the hog. If youhave ever had a smokehouse cured ham, or smoke cured bacon you would see the skin aids in the curing process. There are many reasons to scald and scrape the hair off the hog.

Have you heard the expression that you use everything from the hog except the squeel? Well this is one of the reasons.
You forgot rind-on bacon. :thumb:

I have skinned a hog, its a little more work than skinning a deer but its doable.

There was a thread around here a few months ago with several videos of scalding hogs as well as various ways of butchering. Maybe I will scratch around and see if I can find it.
 

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If you have never had whole hog slow cooked for hours then it would be difficult to get the picture. Another reason is to cure the meat it is beneficial to have the skin on the hog. If youhave ever had a smokehouse cured ham, or smoke cured bacon you would see the skin aids in the curing process. There are many reasons to scald and scrape the hair off the hog.

Have you heard the expression that you use everything from the hog except the squeel? Well this is one of the reasons.
You forgot rind-on bacon. :thumb:

I have skinned a hog, its a little more work than skinning a deer but its doable.

There was a thread around here a few months ago with several videos of scalding hogs as well as various ways of butchering.

http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=187751&highlight=Hogs

Heres one I found, its not the one I was thinking about but it gets to the same conclusion.
 

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Sprinkle crushed rosin (pine pitch) over the hog. Cover with a burlap bag and pour boiling water on it. Wait a couple of minutes and scrape the loosened hair off.
 

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The Red Dragon Vapor Torch Kits will quite easily burn the hair off of hogs or bores with no problem. The scald tank method works quite well also. I have seen a couple hogs dipped in boiling water and then the skin was scraped. After the skin was scraped it was clearly bald. Anyway I believe if I could afford to buy a propane torch then that would be the way I would go because you don't have to exert as much energy to burn the hair off. I would take a decent sized butcher knife and give the skin a good scrape after either method just to get the leftover hair off.
 

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When we butchered we put the hog in very hot water for awhile then scrapped the skin with sharp scrappers. The scrappers were round and convex and had a handle in the middle they were just rubbed over the entire surface of the hog.
 

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No Ambulance For You
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks yall for your knowledge and experiences. Can't wait for the day I have a place of my own and start raising some pigs.
 

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ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒ&
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I knew a guy who used a weed whacker. He did not want to burn it because he mDe pork cracklings from the skin.
 

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I have done both skinning and scraping a hog. skinning one is a lot easier, but if you scrape one try hanging it up and pour the water over it (starting at the top working down) we would boil the water and put it in igloo coolers then use mugs or cups to pour
 

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Bravo Zulu
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Scald them, scrape the skin. If there's any hair left, burn it off. I worked a couple of shifts in an abattoir, my job was just to burn the hair off the hogs. Up one side, down the other. turn around, up one side, down the other. Next pig. 2 x 20lb propane tanks per shift.
 

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Sith inqusitor
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old cheap way

When I was a kid, we raised hogs and butchered quite a few. We always had an old bathtub in the backyard for this. We got it free from a house remodel. Build a fire under it and, there you go. We did have to have an A-frame to lower and raise the hog. It was my dad and I doing it, and I was only 90 lbs wet.
 
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