Survivalist Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
246 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Repost from my blog - (ETA this is *obviously* from this summer...)

Here's what a truly organic garden looks like

I thought I would post some pictures of my garden (veggie and flower) so you can see what no pesticides and no chemical fertilizers look like.

I water the veggies once a week for 3 hours. The flowers get watered every couple of days, but the flowerbed was just planted in July so it needs time to become established.

That said - here we go -

The first picture is our new front walkway with our new landscaping. The rich black soil is merely composted horse manure and sawdust.




Next up are the Yellow Brandywine tomatoes...nothing, not downpours nor deer can stop these heirloom tomatoes!



Every year we have mystery squash of some sort. This year are some strange looking pumpkin type devices. It's like Christmas...with err squash...



Our neighbor dug a hole in our yard to get to his water meter. He never filled it in so we did with some nice dirt from an old Swiss Chard bed (died 4 YEARS AGO!!)...I guess seeds last that long exposed to the elements...I have never watered nor placed any poo around these lovely plants. I am however, planting more Swiss Chard there now and will start caring for it.



Ahhh, the next item in my garden line-up is not a plant at all, but a little sweetheart who loves to touch and taste (nearly) everything in my garden. I couldn't let him do that if I used nasty chemicals.




MMMM Sweet 100 Cherry Tomatoes...'nuff said.



This pile of plants are 4 Lemon Cucumber plants. We ended up with about 50#s of cucumbers this year!



I did very little work in my garden to reap these rewards. I do not till or weed. I just mulch and that's about it...

:eek:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
959 Posts
nice job.i am going to do more raised beds around my fruit trees.i have to keep electric around everything..you should see what a bear does to a peach tree only a few inches in diameter with 10 peaches on it.they tear up everything.but not anymore....zap...zap goes the fence...run ...run goes the bear...roflmao.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
246 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I've seen what a bear can do to a full grown tree!! So I can imagine what they do to a baby Peach tree! Yikes!

I have a Gallagher fence charger. Woohoo that thing can zap!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
very nice

The pics look great. We have been experimenting growing veggies in our basement. We use full spectrum florescence lights, and the plants are in grown in 18X36X10 containers. We place containers on the lids for drainage and fill them with 3 inches of sand then 4 inches of top soil. We plant a variety of lettuces and so far they are growing great. We plan to try out many more plant types to see how easy it is to grow food this way. Good way to have a garden if you don't have the yard space for it.

2sn33ky
 

·
How's it with stains?
Joined
·
283 Posts
I know a guy who doesn't use chemicals on his stuff either. I wondered how he kept the bugs off and was told that all he uses is soapy water. Sounds good if it works. Has anyone had any experience with this?

I did my first garden last year (in buckets since we rent right now) and only had bug problems with one of the plantings. I had to spray the tomatoes but the squash and peppers were fine. The tomatoes were the only bucket that didn't have marigolds planted alongside. Does anyone know of other plants that help to keep bugs away? I'd love it if I never had to spray any chems again!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
246 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I know a guy who doesn't use chemicals on his stuff either. I wondered how he kept the bugs off and was told that all he uses is soapy water. Sounds good if it works. Has anyone had any experience with this?

I did my first garden last year (in buckets since we rent right now) and only had bug problems with one of the plantings. I had to spray the tomatoes but the squash and peppers were fine. The tomatoes were the only bucket that didn't have marigolds planted alongside. Does anyone know of other plants that help to keep bugs away? I'd love it if I never had to spray any chems again!!

First thing to do is get rid of the soil from last year and sterilize those buckets...then no pests can overwinter.

Secondly - mulch the soil in the buckets (dried grass clippings whatever) - I don't know why it works to keep pests away - but it does.

Thirdly - if your pests were aphids try planting a few garlic cloves with the tomatoes - this works for roses too.

Fourth - use a couple drops of dishsoap in a squirt bottle full of water - go slow and get the tops and undersides of the leaves. DO NOT spray the blossoms...or they might not fruit.

Fifth - if your pests were hornworms (giant green worms) mulch extra heavily and hand pick them off the plants. Spray plant with soap solution.

Sixth - I forgot - do not spray soap on plants on a sunny day - the soap magnifies the sun and can scald your plants.

Seventh - read this link about companion planting.

Eighth and final note - read the following excerpt from my blog about integrated pest management (for future reference when you have a chunk of land).

Somewhere a long time ago, I read that the shortage of Hummingbirds was because of pesticides. At my old place (about 75 miles east of here) I counted11 Hummingbirds at one time all vying for a spot on the feeder. I have seen 1 a year here in the Willamette Valley! The difference is terrible, and I really miss those little zoomers.

According to Jonathan Ya'akobi at Dry Climate Gardening, a pair of nesting birds can eat 75 pounds (POUNDS!!) of bugs in a year. This includes aphids, insect eggs and caterpillars.

I've been actively researching plants that attract birds (bees, butterflies and beneficial insects) and are still part of my edible landscaping plan.

To attract and keep the beneficial critters a few things are needed - food, water, shelter and no pesticides.

Food:

Blueberry
Huckleberry
Raspberry
Grapes
Mulberry
Plum
Calendula
Dill (food for Black Swallowtail caterpillars)
Fennel (food for Black Swallowtail caterpillars)
Nasturtium
Parsley (food for Black Swallowtail caterpillars)
Sunflowers
Anise Hyssop
Pineapple Sage
Cherry
Crab Apples (Crab Apple Jelly anyone?)
Hazelnuts/ Filberts
Walnuts
Chesnuts

I also located this LIST online that has some great suggestions for attracting birds.

The folks at EarthEasy have plenty of suggestions how to control pests by attracting beneficial insects too!

Shelter:

Evergreen shrubs and trees (leaves or needles or both!) to protect them from predators and the elements.

Water:

Birds love water that drips so a tiny fountain is sure to attract them.
A birdbath is great too.

Butterflies like a little muddy place that they can sip tiny amounts of water from. Think 'marsh garden'.

I don't know about you, but I would much rather lose a berry or two to a flock of birds than sit on a chemical soaked lawn.
 

·
Molōn Labe!
Joined
·
673 Posts
Sterilized containers will prevent any pests from remaining in them, as well as any soil born problems such as fungus or bacteria. It's a good idea to sterilize all containers before you plant in them. Some people can reuse the same container for 10 years without sterilization and never NEED to do it. That goes to better technique and control of the environment during its use. If you don't have that kind of experience, then its best to sterilize and prevent any possibility of it occurring.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top