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Discussion Starter #1
I live near Chicago, we have almost a foot of snow on the ground, we have freezing fog and more snow falling. My carbon monoxide went off earlier. There is no way to get to a hotel. We turned the heat off and opened a couple windows a crack. Now we will see how cold it gets in our townhouse. We will see just how well we manage to keep warm until morning when we can get someone here to check it out. I figure we will turn the heat on for ten minutes every hour or so, leave the windows cracked and bundle up under all the blankets we can find. I am wondering if the furnace vent is clogged with ice and snow. The furnace is only a about 4 years old.
 

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Time to hit reset
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Have you been able to visually check the exhaust vent? I know it would be dangerous climbing on a roof under those circumstances listed, but you may be able to check from the ground.
Good luck and stay warm.:)
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
There is no way to get on the roof and check. This is a two story townhouse. We just rent and don't have a ladder that long anymore. I just turned the heat back on and so far no alarm.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
We changed the battery in the detector. So far it has not gone off again. We took turns getting up in the night to turn the heat on for 10 minutes at a time. I think it is time to look into a different heat source for emergencies.
 

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Prepared
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Electric space heaters are great until the power goes out. Get a kerosene heater. The give you heat, light and you can cook on them. I have two kerosun 23,000 btu heaters. Had them about ten years, still work great on the original wicks. They have hundreds of hours of use. Kerosene is safe to store and it has a long shelf life.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I knew I could keep my family warm, but I was worried about pipes breaking. I also have 4 aquariums with tropical fish in them. I was not sure the heaters in the tanks could keep up.
 

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Super Gassy Moderator
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Electric space heaters are great until the power goes out. Get a kerosene heater. The give you heat, light and you can cook on them. I have two kerosun 23,000 btu heaters. Had them about ten years, still work great on the original wicks. They have hundreds of hours of use. Kerosene is safe to store and it has a long shelf life.
Agreed, but since the power was on, the electric heaters are much cheaper to run. Kerosene, at least locally, is very costly.
 

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Super Gassy Moderator
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I knew I could keep my family warm, but I was worried about pipes breaking. I also have 4 aquariums with tropical fish in them. I was not sure the heaters in the tanks could keep up.
You can wrap blankets around the aquariums to slow down the heat loss. I've had to do that before.
 

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See, You probably live in the suburbs. Which means you have to deal with bs codes, and property associations telling you you cant have a chimney. I live in Chicago, and I don't have to worry about heat. My father installed a wood burning stove right before Y2K. That thing is a godsend. Put in sum ceramic bricks, and it will keep your 1st floor warm for 6+ hrs. On a day like today, i was walking around the house in shorts and a tee. Its -9 degrees C btw lol.
 

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I guess i don't put a lot of faith in those CO detectors. I used to be a HVAC technician and would get called regularly after hours because someones' CO detector "detected". I used a CO sniffer which was the type used in mines, with a one- time sealed test vial to sniff. NEVER once did I find elevated levels of CO in a house. Never. I would, of course check the furnace out, but usually it seemed to be a false alarm. Some of those earlier CO detectors were notorious for false alarms.
Even the local gas supplier utility would not test a home for CO if called; they referred us to check the heating equipment. The local fire department would also call us, after they checked the house for obvious problems.
If you have a high efficiency furnace, the first thing to check is the vent, be it outside on the wall or through the roof. If it is blocked, though, the furnace will shut down quickly, and stay locked out. Seeing as you rent, why can't you get the owner to fix it NOW... they are responsible for providing heat to you?
Also, everone has an oven. Crank it up and open the door. Beats freezing at least a little bit till your emergency HVAC person shows up( which should be in a prompt, timely manner!)
 

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Call the local FD - - - they should have meters to check for CO and it could just be a defective detector
Man that would suck if it was a faulty reading, we have at least two cases a year in Western New York where someone is either dead or barely alive and having to be pulled from the house due to CO poison. Scarry stuff.
 

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Prophet
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We just rent and don't have a ladder that long anymore.
phone your landlord. if you have heating issues, he should look after them. you shouldn't have to pay to repair anythinf furnace related, and you shouldn't have to freeze. you are paying good money for your home.
if he doesn't, i'd find a new landlord.
 

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Also, everone has an oven. Crank it up and open the door. Beats freezing at least a little bit till your emergency HVAC person shows up( which should be in a prompt, timely manner!)


yep why not bake some muffins and cakes while you are at it :) makes pleasent time with the family and gets you some more energy to shiver and heat your body from whithin
 
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