Survivalist Forum banner
1 - 20 of 34 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello ladies and gents

Im needing help picking out a truck for a daily driver/BOV. I know you will all want as much info about my situation and requirements so here I go.
I live in central Oregon butt bol is in southern Oregon my distance to travel is roughly 300 miles, this of course depends on road conditions and rout taken. Snow will be an issue dependent on season. I will be carrying all of my gear and 2 others.
I want a smaller 4x4 truck. Im thinking late 70's early 80's I want an older engine more or less because I will be able to work on it without all of the computers to worry about and the emp factor. Im thinking a 4 cylinder would be best so I can afford it as a daily driver and I won't have to tow anything. It would also have to have a back seat of sorts for an extra person. Im not the most mechanically inclined person but I would dedicate to learning all that I could about the inner workings of the rig. Any pointers would be greatly appreciated. Thank you in advance for your responses, Griffin777
 

·
No mi porta
Joined
·
264 Posts
I'd love one. It's a but big for me. If at all possible I'd like a truck that'll get me 25+ mpg. Im a young married guy (22) I couldn't afford to drive it.
Not to burst your bubble but you are going to be very hard pressed to find a rig to carry everything you need and get that kind of mileage. Also just because a diesel truck is on the large size doesn't mean it will get bad fuel economy, I've pulled 26mpg out of my 94 Dodge Diesel 4x4 on a long trip doing 65mph, plus the factory 35 gallon fuel tank really is nice when you dont want to stop.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,346 Posts
I want a smaller 4x4 truck.
Im thinking a 4 cylinder
It is next to impossible to find a new - let alone a used - 4x4 pickup that has a four cylinder engine. In fact, the "smaller 4x4 truck" seems to have gone nearly extinct as neither the Ranger nor the Dakota are currently in production. Nissan still makes the frontier...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Late 70's to early 80's Isuzu diesel. My wifes grandfather had 2 of them. One was a 4x4. They used to drive them from south Louisiana to Alaska every year for more than 15 years. Both are still being used to some extent.,or the 1st Gen 12 valve cummins. I prefer diesels for the power, economy, and longevity.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Not to burst your bubble but you are going to be very hard pressed to find a rig to carry everything you need and get that kind of mileage. Also just because a diesel truck is on the large size doesn't mean it will get bad fuel economy, I've pulled 26mpg out of my 94 Dodge Diesel 4x4 on a long trip doing 65mph, plus the factory 35 gallon fuel tank really is nice when you dont want to stop.
The millage IM looking for is the daily driver aspect. I keep my auto edc semi light and when shtf I can add too it. I was thinking a truck a long the lines of a Chevy s10 Durango 4x4. Or at least that general size. I'd love to get a small truck with a diesel engine. Unfortunately IM having a very hard time finding one that I can afford. My thought Is get a small truck that I can make dependable for now while money is somewhat tight and those trucks being a dime a dozen seen practical. Then later I could get something that will be my designated bov. For now I need something that will get me around town and if need be get me across the state in a shtf situation. I appreciate the insight. I might just be on a pipe dream and the truck I want for does not exist.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,899 Posts
For larger trucks I would go Ford 7.3 diesel or Cummins 12 valve.
If size is a problem you would be really limited if you plan on traveling through snow.
In the far north (where I am originally from) FWD compact cars often fare better than Rangers, S10's, and alike.
 

·
Rouge Lemming
Joined
·
297 Posts
You might consider an early 80's Toyota 4x4 they are tough.I had a 81 model simple to work on. Geared low wouldn't go very fast but would pull a load.Got over 20mpg don't remember exactly. Also had a 96 model weaker suspension wouldn't haul as much as the 81 but rode a lot better. It got around 23 mpg.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
472 Posts
I want a smaller 4x4 truck. Im thinking late 70's early 80's I want an older engine more or less because I will be able to work on it without all of the computers to worry about and the emp factor.

Im not the most mechanically inclined person but I would dedicate to learning all that I could about the inner workings of the rig.
If your not mechanically inclined, I would highly suggest not getting a 30-40 year old vehicle. Even the most immaculately restored pristine examples will require a **** ton more work than any modern vehicle with EFI. They're also really not that much simpler, certainly not enough to justify their use in a daily driver. Giving up benefits like incredibly improved driveability, drastically better fuel mileage, significantly improved peak and average power, and an immensely longer service life, just to name a few, for "simpler" technology, is misguided nostalgia at best. There is a reason why the new 6 cylinder mustangs are faster than the fastest muscle cars of the 60s and 70s.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,450 Posts
Ford Ranger. i'm currently driving a 1983 model, std cab, 4x4, 5 spd, and the v6 engine. i put an extra 27 gal gas tank in the bed and carry about 43 gal. total. i re-geared it and dumped all the smog stuff. i also added a 2 in. body lift and run 245/75x16 tires on it. it drives very well and i just got back from a 1600+ mi trip with it. it's made about 4-5 of those trips now, in addition to being a daily driver. it also makes monthly 400 mi trips. i've had it about 5 years now and i take very good care of it.
parts for it are plentiful enough. even more so if you want the 4 cyl version. and they did make them as an extended cab in the mid 1980's. also, after about 1986-7 (iirc) they went with fuel injection. that adds electronics you don't seem to want.
you will have to check the gearing as the 4 cyl motor isn't very powerful. the standard 3.45 gears make it pretty gutless and you keep the gas pedal on the floor most of the time. that doesn't get you very good mileage at all. using 4.10 or 4.56 gears will get the most from the little 4 banger and allow you to keep up with traffic without your foot to the floor all the time. also you will be able haul stuff in the bed, and even pull a small utility trailer or small camper.
most important thing with the rangers is to make sure you get the manual transmission and the manual transfer case model. the push button 4x4 models are problematic. the auto tranny is the same way and tends to get swapped out just as quickly as the tc.
if this might be what you're looking for, then i'd go here for more info: www.therangerstation.com
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
531 Posts
Have owned several different 4X4's found that the Toyota with the R22 engine is hard to beat,the 81-83 are built to do most anything you plan with in reason.
84 - 86 have a little more room in the cabs but with three adults its tight
but will go most any where and get 21-23 mpg
The leaf springs on the front do climb better than the 87 up but they do have a better ride have had a couple through the years and its
hard to believe but over 308450 miles and still running and not burning oil.
you can add an extra tank where the spare tire is or put tanks in the bed along the wheel wells tie them together and can fill the main tank while you
are driving with a valve tied to a switch just watch your guage......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
311 Posts
your requirements of 4 cyl, back seat, 4x4, pre-electronic (as much as possible), your only real option is an old jeep CJ. but even then you will need many gas cans to get to 300 miles since the older ones only had about a 10 gallon tank under the driver seat, and the mileage wasnt very good, and if you not mechanically inclined...... forget about a jeep.
 

·
Hillbilly Deluxe
Joined
·
403 Posts
Maybe a carbureted toyota r20 pickup. That motor has a reputation for being pretty bulletproof, but it's a little anemic by some standards. But that could translate into good highway mpg unloaded for everyday driving.

Edit: Whoops, I missed Nomad's post. Yeah, what he said. :p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
I agree with thoughts on older vehicles vs. newer. Older non-computerized carbureted vehicles are mechanicaly and electricaly simpler. If your are not that skilled at working on cars older cars can be understood far more quickly than newer cars. In fact, I doubt there is a mechanic out there that can honestly say he can fix anything on all of the newer cars. Most of the newer electronics require constant schooling by the mechanics that specialize in that particular brand of vehicle, not to mention all of the expensive special diagnostic equipment/tools. While it is true that a newer car is more reliable I believe that can only be said when operated in an enviroment where new clean fuel is available. Old, dirty fuel will render a new fuel injected car useless. A carburated car also suffers from this issue but a quick simple 15min carb rebuild and easy to replace/fabricate fuel filter and you are on your way again. The jets in a carb are also larger and less likely to clog than injectors. With regards to the microprocessors, the quality control can only detect so much. You honestly have know idea when one would fail, leaving you stranded. It might last 30,000 or 400,000 miles. It will also give no warning befare it fails. Older cars generally give signs that something is wrong, alowing you to plan for maintenance or decide whether or not you should chance it and take that trip. In this post apoctolytic world the old car becomes the more reliable one, assuming it was in good shape to begin with.

The old 69 Chev body styles have good strong bodies and are not prone to rusting out much. From 72, until the body changed, I think in the 80's, had bad rust issues. Other than that the Chev would be a good choice especially if you had a 350. Very popular engine. Older Fords are very plentiful have excellent running gear but the engines where produced for short periods compared to the Chev 350. Personaly I would recomend an inline 6 over a 4 or 8, unless you need a big block. 6 cylinders, if designed properly can get better than 25 mpg. They also can produce better low end torque which is prefered for towing, milieage and off-road, with the exception of competition off-road sports. I would also recomend a full size truck over a smaller truck because mileage differance isnt much and you have better capabilties. Most of the large trucks you hear about getting 10 mpg can be drastically improved with better ignitions, carbs and exhaust, just to name a few. With the inline six you should already be getting the same or better mileage as a midsize truck. With improvments even better.
 

·
Demon of the Midwest
Joined
·
4,978 Posts
Throw another vote for Toyota in there. They are tough little trucks. Youtube topgear kills toyota pickup. Ill give you a hint, they can't.

I have an older Landcruiser and its a great truck. It has been dependable, and used on a number of road trips. The old Toyota pickups are still around, but not many want to part with them, I know I won't be any time soon.
 
1 - 20 of 34 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top