Survivalist Forum banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Would you guys mind helping me choose a sleeping bag? I've narrowed it down to the following makers:

Slumberjack
Western Mountaineering
High Peak

I live in TX and although I don't really need a 0 bag, I think I'm going to opt for one that goes colder than I need just in case I relocate at some point to a colder climate. Should I go sub zero?

Thanks in advance for the advice, this forum has been so helpful! :thumb:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
I could use some help as well, but I'm going to be camping in maine off and on from late May to possibly November. Any recommendations?
 

·
Looks like rain to me.
Joined
·
41,431 Posts
Have you thought about a military 4 part bag? They can be layered for mild weather to colder weather.

I don't have either of the 3 you mention, but have read great reviews of the Slumberjack.

My .02
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Have you thought about a military 4 part bag? They can be layered for mild weather to colder weather.

I don't have either of the 3 you mention, but have read great reviews of the Slumberjack.

My .02
I'm open to anything at this point. I just narrowed down the field to those three bags based on all the reading I've been doing...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,064 Posts
Most bags yu find nowadays are Hollowfill which is good but it is gen1 compared with polartech. Not sure what other bags are Polartech but I know the North Face Bags are. I dont have the luxury of owning one. I am tall and very broad in the shoulders so most bags dont fit me. Northface just came out with the Mamoth but it is a little too late already got my bags for me and the family. My best one (not lightest) is on old military bag that is made of down and wool. Never anything been more comfortable or warmer than this thing. Another good cheap one I have is the Field $ Stream 20 degree bag they sell at DIcks. I picked it up for my GF when it was on sale one time and it has turned out to be a really decent bag. And I also have an OD Green bag I bought on Ebay from some no name brand. And it has turned out to be an outstanding bag. Very light, packs small, very war, and very rugged. I cant remebr what its called though and I dont have it with me or I would look. But the guy sells a bunch of em on ther in like Digital Camo and Od Green, Black, Brown, And old BDU camo, and tan too I think.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
589 Posts
This may not be the answer you are looking for, but...

In the past I first started to use wool blankets and poncho liners for camping because it was all I could afford. Then I saved up enough money and bought an excellent sleeping bag, a Wiggy's FTRSS, and thought it was the cat's meow. Now I find myself going back to more primitive methods of camping and leaving a lot of the "high tech" or "modern" stuff at home. Truth be told, a wool blanket is far more versatile than a sleeping bag is.

It can serve as a sleeping bag, ground mat, hammock, tarp (for light drizzles), small backpack (if you roll and fold it right), and even as a coat if you know the trick. Additionally, a wool blanket will not burn or melt like synthetics will. I have used a wool blanket down to 0 degrees with a -5 wind chill and lived to tell about it. While a wool blanket will never be as light or as compact as a modern sleeping bag, its versatility and multi-functions mean I can leave other items at home that would otherwise increase my pack weight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,064 Posts
Well i just have to say that I spent about 3 months homeless. All I had at the time was a wool blanket and I was not that happy with it. Now if had had my new synthetics I know for sure I would have been in a much better mood back then.

And I always hear people talk about bags burning and stuff. I dont mean at all to be rude. But I do wonder if it has ever happened to anyone on here. I have been camping hiking and backpacking for a long time and I have never had this problem not even ash holes. Just wondered if there are any personal experiences to go along with that point of veiw.
 

·
Watching
Joined
·
55 Posts
US ARMY modular sleeping system, without question, this is the finest sleeping bag I've ever owned. I'm in Michigan, and have slept in this bag in all four seasons, never had the slightest problem. It's warm, tough, and waterPROOF. I've had other bags in the past, some of them being very good, but this system puts them to shame.

http://www.surplusandoutdoors.com/shop/camping-equipment/sleeping-bags/product-489904.html

I would look around and see what you can do about the price, but I see them for around $129 (used) to $179 (new)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
402 Posts
I have 2 slumberjack bags. One is a 0 deg bag and the other is a 20 deg. Both are really good. I like the 20 because it packs down smaller and is lighter. Both work well in the deserts of Arizona, sometimes it gets to warm. As far as going sub zero I would wait till/if you move. Even then you could buy a bag liner and get an extra 10-15 degrees. A sub zero bag is going to be heavier and not pack down as small which just means more weight to carry and space to lose.

To narrow down your choices you need to ask yourself questions. Is this bag going to be for hiking/bob use or a car camping deal? Do you want the bag to be light weight? What kind of fill do you want, down or a synthetic? Do you like a mummy bag or rectangular box shape? Do you have a tent or do you want the sleeping bag to be like a bivy? Once you know what you want then look and see what the makers have to offer.

The other thing that matters is price. I did a quick search and it looks like the Western bags go for around $250 on up. What are you willing to pay. I've paid less than $100 for each of my slumberjacks and they haven't failed me yet. I find the slumberjacks to be a good bargain for a quality product.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hey guys, I decided to pick up a 4 component Gore-tex military MSS (appx. $150 shipped). I really like the idea of layering when needed, thanks for all of the great advice! :thumb:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
I'm not very familiar with the other two brands, but I've played with the Western Mountaineering bags. They are incredible, but also incredibly pricey. For temperature rating, I'd get the coldest temp bag I expect to REGULARLY encounter minus 10 degrees. So if your usual coldest camping temp is 30, go 20. Going too low-rated gives you weight and comfort problems. Nobody likes to spend all night zipping and unzipping with one side freezing and the other side sweating. Then get a sleeping bag liner, which extends the life of your bag by keeping body oils out of it, and adds 5-15 degrees to the rating of the bag, depending on material. That way, you have a sleep system that covers you in warm (just the liner), cold (the bag), and coldest (bag+liner).


Edit: Sorry about the too late post, didn't read the last one where you made up your mind.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top