Survivalist Forum banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Capability, not scenarios
Joined
·
11,888 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've laid in a supply of wheat berries, but what I don't have yet is a grain mill.

I've done the usual weighing of pros and cons, and decided (as usual) that higher quality is better than lower quality.

While I'm not made of money, I'm seeing a mill as an investment, and further, it has to be good enough to survive potentially many years following TS hitting TF.

Right now, I've narrowed it down to two mills, though I'd consider another option should anyone have one to suggest.

I want the mill to be operable by hand, as easily as is practical, but also be motorized should electricity to run it be available.

Option One:

The Country Living Grain Mill.
(http://countrylivinggrainmills.com/). Pros: Described by some as the Cadillac of mills; easy turning, sturdy, can be motorized or even attached to a bike. Cons: Very expensive ($457+ after accessories in the configuration I'd want it, plus spare parts), extra cost to motorize it.

Option Two:

The Family Grain Mill.
(http://www.pleasanthillgrain.com/family_grain_mills.aspx). Pros: Not as pricey, can come already motorized or convert to hand crank, has a number of attachments...Cons: I can't really think of any except that it appears the motorized base is on back order until December...


Now, naturally, it would appear that Option Two (Family Grain Mill) wins out, and it is my first choice. However, I learned a long time ago that compromising on quality simply means I get to be reminded of that choice every time I use the product.

Any reason you can think of why the Family Grain Mill isn't a good choice?
 

·
workin on it......
Joined
·
1,110 Posts
I saved and went with the Country Living. I was waffle-ing on those same two, and the hubby explained it to me like this: This is going to be a tool that will be needed every day. So, you go for quality. Thats what he does with his tools for work. This is a tool for my work. So I went with the CL. I got a repair kit, the auger for corn amd beans and a spare wheat auger.
I like that it can be made to run with a bike. That is the plan down the road for us. I also have a spare/backup small Victorio mill.
Once I go through the flour I have packaged in buckets, then I'll start using the CL on the wheat I have stored.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
I bought a Wonder Mill Junior for $200, hand crank with two pairs of 4 inch burrs. One is made of stainless steel and the other one is stone. Its a workout to grind wheat but I wanted something sturdy that can grind corn as well and other things.
 

·
Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
Joined
·
67,429 Posts
I have the Country Living mill and don't regret the decision one bit, although it was pricey. It'll last a lifetime.

In retrospect, I've often wondered if I wouldn't have been better off with two lesser priced mills though. First off, it lets two people mill at the same time. Milling is slow and tedious, even with the Country Living mill. Secondly, there's redundancy. You always have a backup.

A few things to consider when choosing a mill. Will it grind corn? I've heard that some won't. Corn is easy to grow and dry yourself. Popcorn is also available in bulk cheaply everywhere and it makes some of the best cornmeal you've ever tasted.

The other thing is the ability to be motorized. A motor is sure nice during good times. But a mill that's specifically designed as a hand mill that can be motorized is most likely going to be a lot easier to turn than a mill designed to be motorized that also has a hand crank as a "backup". There are a few of those on the market too. They might be ok during a short term power outage, but they're really not designed for full time hand crank use and are a LOT more work. Even the Country Living mill is a lot of work.
 

·
sic transit gloria mundi
Joined
·
858 Posts
On this I can give an unqualified response.

The Family Grain Mill just doesn't have the muscle you need. It absolutely won't grind corn and it took me almost an hour to grind enough hard white wheat to make a single loaf of bread.

I ordered the Country Living Mill on Friday from some outfit in LA and would be more than willing to give you a great deal on a barely used Family Grain Mill (but you'd be nuts if you took it).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,492 Posts
Country Living mill. Buy once, cry once. It's very well made, what some call "heirloom quality" these days. I have one and don't regret buying it at all.

Whichever mill you get, I hope your arms are in shape. Without a motorized adapter, you'll feel it quickly when grinding.
 

·
Bleach blonde on fire :p
Joined
·
6,173 Posts
From time to time models become available that have a superficial ding or imperfection in the powder coating. Many of these blemishes are scarcely noticeable, and while fully functional and fully guaranteed, these models cannot be sold through our dealers. If you are interested in obtaining a blemished Country Living Mill call or email us for information on availability and pricing.

Go with this option....my Dad has one that he got like this and it was reduced by $120......well worth the reduction for what little blemish was on it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,224 Posts
That being said...
I'm a big fan of the Corona Grain Mill. Made for corn but can produce pretty fine wheat flour with a few passes. & you can buy MANY of them for the price of just one Country Living mill.
If it was me, I'd get a "blemished" Country Living mill for cake flour and a couple Corona mills for everything else. That way, EVERYTHING lasts longer...
 

·
Not what I appear to be
Joined
·
2,174 Posts
If you buy a Corona mill, consider this. The Corona mill has metal grinding burrs, fine for a course grain but not for a fine grind for flour. Nazko offers a set of stone burrs to fit the Corona, http://www.nazko.com/corona_stone_kit.html . I have used the Nazko stone burr retrofit on a Weston mill I purchased.
I also have a Silver Nugget mill from Nazko that works great.
One last thing, Nazko products are made in Idaho.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,224 Posts
If you buy a Corona mill, consider this. The Corona mill has metal grinding burrs, fine for a course grain but not for a fine grind for flour. Nazko offers a set of stone burrs to fit the Corona, http://www.nazko.com/corona_stone_kit.html . I have used the Nazko stone burr retrofit on a Weston mill I purchased.
I also have a Silver Nugget mill from Nazko that works great.
One last thing, Nazko products are made in Idaho.
Wow. You just saved me a chunk of change. Thanks!
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top