Survivalist Forum banner
1 - 20 of 55 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hello, i recently flew to Washington state looking for a place that i can practice my survival skills but is close enough to a urban environment that i can bike to get supplies etc (cars to expensive for a youngster like me :p). im looking at
Snohomish County but i cant seem to find much woodland around, ive heard alot of people are from Spokane but ive heard that there is alot of gangs and drugs over there which i dont want, ive also heard bellingham is pretty good but that seems to have no woodland at all nearby,so i need some help
thanks
 

·
To the surface!
Joined
·
8,012 Posts
Uhhh, plenty of woodland around Snohomish county, just do not get anything down in the valley along the river, it floods often.



If you are not in need of a job then just about anything north of Everett and east of I-5 and up off the flood plain will do fine. I personally like the woodlands up east of Hwy 9.

The problem with the area is that in an emergency is that you will have a lot of people flowing out of Seattle.
 

·
Pleasantly demented woman
Joined
·
3,760 Posts
hello, i recently flew to Washington state looking for a place that i can practice my survival skills but is close enough to a urban environment that i can bike to get supplies etc (cars to expensive for a youngster like me :p). im looking at
Snohomish County but i cant seem to find much woodland around, ive heard alot of people are from Spokane but ive heard that there is alot of gangs and drugs over there which i dont want, ive also heard bellingham is pretty good but that seems to have no woodland at all nearby,so i need some help
thanks

So.... did you ever read the other thread you started??
 
  • Like
Reactions: TxHills

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Uhhh, plenty of woodland around Snohomish county, just do not get anything down in the valley along the river, it floods often.



If you are not in need of a job then just about anything north of Everett and east of I-5 and up off the flood plain will do fine. I personally like the woodlands up east of Hwy 9.

The problem with the area is that in an emergency is that you will have a lot of people flowing out of Seattle.
thanks alot yea im pretty set on everett, thanks ill be taking a train from seattle to everett tommorow
 

·
To the surface!
Joined
·
8,012 Posts
thanks alot yea im pretty set on everett, thanks ill be taking a train from seattle to everett tommorow
Lake Stevens or outside of it would be better. If you are going to work for Boeing then Lake Stevens, Machias and so on is better and still okay for a commute.

If you have to commute into Seattle then that is a bit different and you have to weigh your commute against how far out you want to live. Everett itself is nothing special, just another and the last on a long list of small cities along I-5 and Hwy 99 that make up the unbroken urban areas of the Seattle metro area from Ft. Lewis to the south all the way to Everett at the north. North of Seattle that chain breaks north of Everett and then you have some rural areas, but at that point you are down on the flood plain except for some hills.

You might also consider crossing over the Puget Sound - it is much more rural over there, but there you are limited in bugging out in any direction - you can only go about 100 miles before you hit water, unless you head south. If you are on the east side of I-5 and out on the edge of the suburban areas, then you can head east or north for thousands of miles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Lake Stevens or outside of it would be better. If you are going to work for Boeing then Lake Stevens, Machias and so on is better and still okay for a commute.

If you have to commute into Seattle then that is a bit different and you have to weigh your commute against how far out you want to live. Everett itself is nothing special, just another and the last on a long list of small cities along I-5 and Hwy 99 that make up the unbroken urban areas of the Seattle metro area from Ft. Lewis to the south all the way to Everett at the north. North of Seattle that chain breaks north of Everett and then you have some rural areas, but at that point you are down on the flood plain except for some hills.

You might also consider crossing over the Puget Sound - it is much more rural over there, but there you are limited in bugging out in any direction - you can only go about 100 miles before you hit water, unless you head south. If you are on the east side of I-5 and out on the edge of the suburban areas, then you can head east or north for thousands of miles.
yea, i was looking around all day on Google maps and i stumbled down too far and found Oregon really it looked like exactly what i wanted
a city called bend with a decent population of 100k but is within spitting distance of the national forest, which is exactly what i wanted, a urban environment surrounded by woodland,since you live in Oregon i was wondering if you could tell me about bend or recommend me another city,thanks
 

·
To the surface!
Joined
·
8,012 Posts
Bend is a strange community. You have PHDs waiting on tables so they can live there. It is highly desirable by people who like to ski (XC or downhill) or snowboard in the winter and do other outdoor stuff in the summer (climb, hike, etc.). As such there is the yuppie crowd there much of the time, but many of these are either part timers or tourists.

Bend was one of the hardest hit by the recession because it does depend on tourism a lot, so right now the real estate market is very down there. If you have the wherewithal then it is a great time to buy there. You never said what your financial situation is, but since you haven't said anything about needing a job I will assume it isn't important to you - which it shouldn't be if you want to live in the Bend area as there are not that many jobs there (but it is where you would look for a job in eastern Oregon).

The weather there is cold in the winter and hot in the summer, but not too much so. I haven't been there when it has gotten too much below zero or too much above 100 deg., but it can do it - just not as regularly as say Montana or Alaska.

As you noticed the location is good - it is far enough away from Portland and Salem and over a mountain pass, that this would discourage much outflow from those areas if the SHTF. The passes are temporarily closed from time to time, and if the SHTF during the winter the passes would not stay open without plowing - although traffic from Portland could maybe come around the long way.

It is located right on the edge of the forest and to the east is the "desert" and further east is mostly desert. Personally I believe most people would have a pretty hard time surviving in any arid desert region without a good water supply (there are some rivers over there, even some lakes and reservoirs).

As I said, the Bend region is in that area where the forest transitions from forest to desert, and it has a lot of sunshine. When it is isn't sunny in the winter it is usually snowing, but Bend itself doesn't often get more than a foot of snow - usually what happens is that most of the snow is dumped on the Cascades before it hits Bend and Bend gets the trailing edge of it. I have been up on Bachelor snow camping and got two feet of powder dumped on me and went down to Bend and the roads were bare. That is not uncommon and it causes skiers/snowboarders new to the area some consternation when they fly in and see no snow until they get nearer Bachelor.

If you stay near the forest then water is less of a concern - especially if you are near one of the rivers. The rivers are very popular for fishing and other water sports. As I said, it is a very desirable area for a lot of people because it is so nice there. My family thought about getting a cabin/condo there, but it never happened.

The closeness of the desert is a concern from the prepper view - if you are looking at going out into the desert then water is a huge concern. The other concern is the number of vacation/resort cabins/etc. - but the last time I was there it wasn't all that bad.

Personally I prefer southern Oregon, Cottage Grove on down. It has much of the same characteristics, but has more rainfall and certainly a lot more forest. It is considered to be one of the prime areas for settling by survivalists, if you can get a job there or don't need one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Bend is a strange community. You have PHDs waiting on tables so they can live there. It is highly desirable by people who like to ski (XC or downhill) or snowboard in the winter and do other outdoor stuff in the summer (climb, hike, etc.). As such there is the yuppie crowd there much of the time, but many of these are either part timers or tourists.

Bend was one of the hardest hit by the recession because it does depend on tourism a lot, so right now the real estate market is very down there. If you have the wherewithal then it is a great time to buy there. You never said what your financial situation is, but since you haven't said anything about needing a job I will assume it isn't important to you - which it shouldn't be if you want to live in the Bend area as there are not that many jobs there (but it is where you would look for a job in eastern Oregon).

The weather there is cold in the winter and hot in the summer, but not too much so. I haven't been there when it has gotten too much below zero or too much above 100 deg., but it can do it - just not as regularly as say Montana or Alaska.

As you noticed the location is good - it is far enough away from Portland and Salem and over a mountain pass, that this would discourage much outflow from those areas if the SHTF. The passes are temporarily closed from time to time, and if the SHTF during the winter the passes would not stay open without plowing - although traffic from Portland could maybe come around the long way.

It is located right on the edge of the forest and to the east is the "desert" and further east is mostly desert. Personally I believe most people would have a pretty hard time surviving in any arid desert region without a good water supply (there are some rivers over there, even some lakes and reservoirs).

As I said, the Bend region is in that area where the forest transitions from forest to desert, and it has a lot of sunshine. When it is isn't sunny in the winter it is usually snowing, but Bend itself doesn't often get more than a foot of snow - usually what happens is that most of the snow is dumped on the Cascades before it hits Bend and Bend gets the trailing edge of it. I have been up on Bachelor snow camping and got two feet of powder dumped on me and went down to Bend and the roads were bare. That is not uncommon and it causes skiers/snowboarders new to the area some consternation when they fly in and see no snow until they get nearer Bachelor.

If you stay near the forest then water is less of a concern - especially if you are near one of the rivers. The rivers are very popular for fishing and other water sports. As I said, it is a very desirable area for a lot of people because it is so nice there. My family thought about getting a cabin/condo there, but it never happened.

The closeness of the desert is a concern from the prepper view - if you are looking at going out into the desert then water is a huge concern. The other concern is the number of vacation/resort cabins/etc. - but the last time I was there it wasn't all that bad.

Personally I prefer southern Oregon, Cottage Grove on down. It has much of the same characteristics, but has more rainfall and certainly a lot more forest. It is considered to be one of the prime areas for settling by survivalists, if you can get a job there or don't need one.
yea im not really in need of a job, i just want to focus on accumulating as much knowledge as i possibly can,ill take a look at the places you prefer thanks for all your help
 

·
To the surface!
Joined
·
8,012 Posts
Have you considered the olympic peninsula?
The Olympic Peninsula is a great area, but the only way you can migrate out of it if you have to escape something external, is to the south. To the west, east and north you have a not insignificant body of water to cross.

Now granted, you have a lot of room to move around in, and it is mostly rural, and a not small part of it is wilderness to one degree or another. It is not a bad choice, one I have thought about. But do take into account the idea that if you have to bug out a long distance to get out of any area, then you have a real barrier on three sides of you that you would eventually have to deal with if whatever was making you bug out mandated you put some real distance between you and the threat.

Of course, I kind of have the same thing - maybe even worse; I intend to settle on the west/wet side of Oregon. If I have to bug out from my BOL, say because of a nuke or invasion or some sort of pogrom, then I will either have to cross the Columbia to the north, head south along a strip of land between I-5 (or maybe the Cascades) and the coast that is about 100 miles wide, or risk crossing I-5 and head up into the Cascades, maybe over into eastern Oregon where there is hundreds of miles of desert to cross, with deep ravines and rivers in some places.

Now I doubt I would ever have to move that far, probably never have to move at all. I think just being out of the Portland metro area and about 30 to 50 miles up into the coastal hills on a more or less self sufficient bit of land will be adequate for my life time. But I do think about such things; i.e., what would I do, what barriers would I face around me, if I had to be a refugee and somebody or something were actively seeking to do me harm in some way?

The advantage of being north of Seattle and on the "mainland" is that you have the option of retreating up into B.C. and thousands of square miles of wilderness not to mention the rest of Canada. If you can get over the Cascades (not trivial once in WA state - many of those passes are difficult if not maintained, the northern most pass is impassable half the year even now) then you can go north along the border and east into Idaho and Montana.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,228 Posts
Just that little thing about a volcano.

It may or not explode in the next few hundreds of years but this country will explode in the next few months.

Plus. If you do not live in river valley where lahars will go there really is much to worry about. Pyroplasic flows do not go all that far. I am outside of the range of those.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
123 Posts
The Olympic Peninsula is a great area, but the only way you can migrate out of it if you have to escape something external, is to the south. To the west, east and north you have a not insignificant body of water to cross.

Now granted, you have a lot of room to move around in, and it is mostly rural, and a not small part of it is wilderness to one degree or another. It is not a bad choice, one I have thought about. But do take into account the idea that if you have to bug out a long distance to get out of any area, then you have a real barrier on three sides of you that you would eventually have to deal with if whatever was making you bug out mandated you put some real distance between you and the threat.

Of course, I kind of have the same thing - maybe even worse; I intend to settle on the west/wet side of Oregon. If I have to bug out from my BOL, say because of a nuke or invasion or some sort of pogrom, then I will either have to cross the Columbia to the north, head south along a strip of land between I-5 (or maybe the Cascades) and the coast that is about 100 miles wide, or risk crossing I-5 and head up into the Cascades, maybe over into eastern Oregon where there is hundreds of miles of desert to cross, with deep ravines and rivers in some places.

Now I doubt I would ever have to move that far, probably never have to move at all. I think just being out of the Portland metro area and about 30 to 50 miles up into the coastal hills on a more or less self sufficient bit of land will be adequate for my life time. But I do think about such things; i.e., what would I do, what barriers would I face around me, if I had to be a refugee and somebody or something were actively seeking to do me harm in some way?

The advantage of being north of Seattle and on the "mainland" is that you have the option of retreating up into B.C. and thousands of square miles of wilderness not to mention the rest of Canada. If you can get over the Cascades (not trivial once in WA state - many of those passes are difficult if not maintained, the northern most pass is impassable half the year even now) then you can go north along the border and east into Idaho and Montana.
True that.
 

·
To the surface!
Joined
·
8,012 Posts
It may or not explode in the next few hundreds of years but this country will explode in the next few months.
Ooookaaay....

You don't really know that any more than you know Mt. Rainier won't blow while you live near it.

People have been saying that TEOTWAWKI is going to happen "any day now" for decades - hasn't happened yet.

That doesn't mean that a person shouldn't prepare, but there are a lot more likely things that can happen.

Come back in a year and tell me how I was wrong.

If I weren't so busy and I was less lazy, I would bump all the posts/thread that are more than a few months old that said "the sky is falling". :thumb:
 

·
that's like, your opinion
Joined
·
17,825 Posts
Uncle Sam may give you an all expenses paid trip to Fort Lewis if you join the Army... the jury is out on your follow up deployment though...
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,228 Posts
Ooookaaay....

You don't really know that any more than you know Mt. Rainier won't blow while you live near it.

:
Like I said before and according to the map posted I am outside of pyroplastic flow danger and above lahar danger so to me Rainier is just a big white bump I see from my window. It does rain here more then elsewhere in Puget Sound because clouds get stuck on the big mountain but other than that … What is it to me that it is there? Big area of protected animals in National Park easier potential poaching after SHTF? Year around supply of fresh water in rivers from glaciers? More fish in those rivers because of that?

I do not see any downsides living where I live because of Rainier.
 

·
To the surface!
Joined
·
8,012 Posts
I do not see any downsides living where I live because of Rainier.
Those evacuation route signs along the road in the area aren't there just for the tourists.

I agree, there are areas where you may be more safe, but IMO the further away the better. A person should be aware that volcanos are by nature more or less unpredictable - you may think you are safe and then find yourself under 50 feet of mud.

Of course, I should talk, we all live more or less within an hours drive of a Volcano in the PNW - some of us are almost surrounded by them. Mt. Hood is close to me.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,228 Posts
Those evacuation route signs along the road in the area aren't there just for the tourists.

I agree, there are areas where you may be more safe, but IMO the further away the better. A person should be aware that volcanos are by nature more or less unpredictable - you may think you are safe and then find yourself under 50 feet of mud.

.
Those are in Orting and some other cities I call “suicide towns”. I live where I can get my lawn chair out and watch town of Orting flow down to Puget Soung on lahar.

Like I said. I am outside of pyroplastic flow area and high enough not to worry about flowing mud. I do not know how many times I have to repeat that before you comprehend it.

Living next to big mountain can have benefits if you smart enough to live in the right spot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Bend is a strange community. You have PHDs waiting on tables so they can live there. It is highly desirable by people who like to ski (XC or downhill) or snowboard in the winter and do other outdoor stuff in the summer (climb, hike, etc.). As such there is the yuppie crowd there much of the time, but many of these are either part timers or tourists.

Bend was one of the hardest hit by the recession because it does depend on tourism a lot, so right now the real estate market is very down there. If you have the wherewithal then it is a great time to buy there. You never said what your financial situation is, but since you haven't said anything about needing a job I will assume it isn't important to you - which it shouldn't be if you want to live in the Bend area as there are not that many jobs there (but it is where you would look for a job in eastern Oregon).

The weather there is cold in the winter and hot in the summer, but not too much so. I haven't been there when it has gotten too much below zero or too much above 100 deg., but it can do it - just not as regularly as say Montana or Alaska.

As you noticed the location is good - it is far enough away from Portland and Salem and over a mountain pass, that this would discourage much outflow from those areas if the SHTF. The passes are temporarily closed from time to time, and if the SHTF during the winter the passes would not stay open without plowing - although traffic from Portland could maybe come around the long way.

It is located right on the edge of the forest and to the east is the "desert" and further east is mostly desert. Personally I believe most people would have a pretty hard time surviving in any arid desert region without a good water supply (there are some rivers over there, even some lakes and reservoirs).

As I said, the Bend region is in that area where the forest transitions from forest to desert, and it has a lot of sunshine. When it is isn't sunny in the winter it is usually snowing, but Bend itself doesn't often get more than a foot of snow - usually what happens is that most of the snow is dumped on the Cascades before it hits Bend and Bend gets the trailing edge of it. I have been up on Bachelor snow camping and got two feet of powder dumped on me and went down to Bend and the roads were bare. That is not uncommon and it causes skiers/snowboarders new to the area some consternation when they fly in and see no snow until they get nearer Bachelor.

If you stay near the forest then water is less of a concern - especially if you are near one of the rivers. The rivers are very popular for fishing and other water sports. As I said, it is a very desirable area for a lot of people because it is so nice there. My family thought about getting a cabin/condo there, but it never happened.

The closeness of the desert is a concern from the prepper view - if you are looking at going out into the desert then water is a huge concern. The other concern is the number of vacation/resort cabins/etc. - but the last time I was there it wasn't all that bad.

Personally I prefer southern Oregon, Cottage Grove on down. It has much of the same characteristics, but has more rainfall and certainly a lot more forest. It is considered to be one of the prime areas for settling by survivalists, if you can get a job there or don't need one.

Cottage Grove is nice, I've thought and researched about relocating there but I am thinking and hoping to relocate to Rogue River...the town. What are your thoughts about down there?
Where about in Oregon are you?
From what I've researched rogue river is a nicely sheltered valley with lots of year round and seasonal creeks, and of course, rogue river. I read somewhere that Rogue River is considered the best place to survive, by a survival expert-that was written out in the 70's. I'm a tiny bit torn to move outside Spokane,Wa, I don't really want to, but my dear friends are up there, but I cringe when thinking of self-reliance in eastern WA, that snow is brutal.
 
1 - 20 of 55 Posts
Top