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Discussion Starter #1
Hi!
I received a Coleman Stainless Steel flask for Christmas. I requested it so as to heat water with a FRH (Flameless Ration Heater) or near a fire. Someone told me stainless steel releases toxins when heated if it is of a certain composition. Is this true? Who has heated water in this fashion using such a drinking flask?
Thanks
KT
 

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Improvise Adapt Overcome!
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I don't think Stainless is the problem, but Aluminum cook ware. My guess is the person that told you is confusing Stainless steel, and aluminum cookware.
 

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I'm having the same concerns. I'm looking for one of those nice 27oz. flasks to take everywhere and want to know if it would take the heat required to boil water, before buying one...
 

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stainless steel is fine for boiling water, and so is aluminium. however, with aluminium a SMALL amount of chemicals are released into the water but they shouldnt do any harm on a small scale. Apperently the chemicals released are thought to be associated with alzheimers.
iv used aluminium for years and not had any problems

As for the flasks, they should be fine for boiling water in, although any finish the flask might have will be proberly be burnt of, (paint, rubber coating etc)

hope this helps
 

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stainless steel is fine for boiling water, and so is aluminium. however, with aluminium a SMALL amount of chemicals are released into the water but they shouldnt do any harm on a small scale. Apperently the chemicals released are thought to be associated with alzheimers.
iv used aluminium for years and not had any problems

As for the flasks, they should be fine for boiling water in, although any finish the flask might have will be proberly be burnt of, (paint, rubber coating etc)

hope this helps
Reply]
When my Grandmother was dying of Alzheimer's, her doctor told us, with no uncertainty that the disease is caused by an aluminum plaque that formed on the brain. he told us that the primary source of this aluminum is from food cooked in aluminum cookware, and anti antiperspirants that that use aluminum in the formula.

My grandmother had all aluminum cookware. After she died I was at her house with my Mom, and uncles. I was sitting in the Kitchen and noticed the old, worn thin aluminum pot she allways cooked with, and it was clear where the brain plaque came from.

If you are into wine making, you cannot ferment in Aluminum, because it will impart a distinct metallic taste and ruin your wine.

So NO, aluminum cookware is NOT safe to boil water in, or touch food of any sort. It is a dangerous metal and should be reserved for building airplane structures, NOT touching our food or water in any way, shape or form!
 

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Zomby Woof
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aluminum hats are OK aren't they? :)
The evidence against aluminum is growing. I think it is probably like most things though; some people are effected and some are not. There are smokers that are 90+ and still smoking, then there are smokers who die of lung cancer when they are 25.
I personally do not use aluminum for cooking, better safe than sorry.
 

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i wouldnt use aluminium at home but every now and then when camping etc doesnt do any harm.

most camping cooking sets are made or aluminium because its lightweight, although there are alot of titanium and stainless steel ones on the market now.
 

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I guess those would be exactly the same compounds you consume every time you drink a canned drink, cokes beer, or whatever. It may be a concern, but surely no link to only aluminum pots and pans. My point, if you are concerned about aluminum, don't single out a camping cup, pot, or flask, when you drink beer or soda pop from aluminum every day.
 

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trois pour cent
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The OP states his flask is stainless steel, not aluminum.

I don't believe there are any safety issues with stainless steel.
 

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From Wiggy's Website:

For several years plastic water bottles have been sold to campers. They are advertised as being light and durable. They may be light, but their durability is questionable. These water bottles have one major deficiency; they will melt if placed too close to or in a fire. The question you may be asking is why would anyone even want to place a water bottle in a fire? Well, let me give you an example of a reason why you would want that option.
I was on a hunting trip in November 1995 in the high country of Colorado near Gunnison in the Fossil Ridge Wilderness area. I was lost for three days. During the second day, I met two youngsters, who as it turned out, were also lost. They were becoming hypothermic and were dehydrating. They needed water. They had plastic water bottles, which I stuffed with snow. I placed them as close to the fire as possible to melt the snow but without success. Had they been stainless steel, I could have placed them in the fire! You may never have to face this situation but you should be prepared. We were found the next day, but having water readily available would have been very helpful. Guaranteed to last a lifetime.

http://wiggys.com/moreinfo.cfm?Product_ID=22
 

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Improvise Adapt Overcome!
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I guess those would be exactly the same compounds you consume every time you drink a canned drink, cokes beer, or whatever. It may be a concern, but surely no link to only aluminum pots and pans. My point, if you are concerned about aluminum, don't single out a camping cup, pot, or flask, when you drink beer or soda pop from aluminum every day.
Reply]
I do not use any Aluminum. I don't drink Sodas, all my cookware is stainless, even in my back pack. I don't even use deodorants that contain aluminum.

I do not even use tinfoil when I grill or cook corn (it musses up the taste of my food anyway).

The Aluminum tools I have, i painted them with a spray on, heavy rubberized coating to keep it from contacting my skin.

After seeing how my Grandmother died, no way I am letting that happen to me.
 

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I cook only in stainless steel or cast iron,I drink WHISKEY OR BEER from glass bottles!!. Just like Henry Ford said:cars are black & houses are white:!!
 

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From Wiggy's Website:

For several years plastic water bottles have been sold to campers. They are advertised as being light and durable. They may be light, but their durability is questionable. These water bottles have one major deficiency; they will melt if placed too close to or in a fire. The question you may be asking is why would anyone even want to place a water bottle in a fire? Well, let me give you an example of a reason why you would want that option.
I was on a hunting trip in November 1995 in the high country of Colorado near Gunnison in the Fossil Ridge Wilderness area. I was lost for three days. During the second day, I met two youngsters, who as it turned out, were also lost. They were becoming hypothermic and were dehydrating. They needed water. They had plastic water bottles, which I stuffed with snow. I placed them as close to the fire as possible to melt the snow but without success. Had they been stainless steel, I could have placed them in the fire! You may never have to face this situation but you should be prepared. We were found the next day, but having water readily available would have been very helpful. Guaranteed to last a lifetime.

http://wiggys.com/moreinfo.cfm?Product_ID=22
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I have a plastic canteen, but i keep a stainless steel flask in my pack as well, for just this reason.
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
Thanks for your replies. I would say put a canteen cup, metal cup, or foldable tinfoil in your kit (to make into a cup) in lieu of the flask. But, but you have to have a fire going. What if you get cold in your tent and don't have a fire available?

Oddly I saw numerous Coleman SS flasks on a "sidekick" display at the nearby Wal-Mart. We live near Robins AFB. I wonder if the airmen are trying the same trick with the flasks (eg. water heating)? Not every warfighter has the new MRE hot/cold beverage bags and they only have so much durability.

As for aluminum the thinking is that aluminum's contribution to Alzheimer's was overstated. Not that I cook with the stuff but....
KT:)
 

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I use stainless and steel pots for camping cheapo ones.. i wouldnt worry to much about it as for aluim it has to very small inorder to enter your body through the skin...

when you think about it everything you eat has something else in it bugs germs metal particals.. I have pots that come with teflon coating and you can now see shiny metal on it so were did all that coating go into the food of course.. it takes a long time for it to affect you but everything in life has risks even liveing
 

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Great, thanks guys. I just got a Kelly kettle for Christmas. I knew there was something I didn't like about it. I never buy aluminum for the above reasons. I guess I will just have to watch it.
 

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I've done that before. Kids and I have a contest to see who can boil it with out melting the bottle. Trick is to keep the flame below that water level.

Jesster1
 

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I think the person who warned you was confused. Stainless steel is used by most good chefs to cook food in. If there was something dangerous with it, even rumored to be dangerous a good restraunt wouldn't use it.

You can heat water in just about any container. I have heated water in pieces of paper rolled up as a funnel. The top edges above the water burned off but below the water level the water keeps the paper cool enough. Stainless steel, with a narrow top is the fastest and safest way to heat water though. To a point, the more narrow the top, the faster it will heat up. A loose lid will help speed up heating as well. Never crank the flask lid all the way when heating with it or you will create a heated water bomb. Steam must be allowed to escape.

I think you got a good present with your flask. You may want to dump the first batch of water just to get rid of any chemicals occured while making the flask but after that you are safe to drink boiled water from it.
 
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