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ICBM Warrior
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Ymmv my experience with Mr buddy and 20 lbs tanks is you get 18 hrs. so plan accordingly

The kerosene heater I have I get 8 hrs per 2 gallon fill. So plan accordingly.

I went through a window with a woodstove pipe, don't use plywood. get some sheet tin and give the pipe a 12 inch margin around it be fore it touches something combustible.
Been thinking of a similar setup, using concrete board with a hole the size of the pipe cut in it. Make it the concrete panel the size of the open window, then cut a hole in the middle. Plenty of clearance at that point.
 

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Scapegoat of the Universe
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A very long time ago, a young kid on the Navajo nation pieced together from random parts a solar heater that kept his grandmother warm using an ingenious idea. He won an award for it and then the concept disappeared off the internet.

What he did was make a solar powered heat pump where the solar panel ran the water in a radiator. the water was pushed outside to be heated by the sun (in 10 F weather) and then came back in, and a fan blew air over the radiator releasing the heat into the house, keeping it a a toasty 85 F. All the parts were scavenged (minus the solar panel)_ from a junk yard.

A Homemade DIY Solar Water Heater (electricitybook.com)
 

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I've done it in a garage window before, and it was safe. I removed the glass and used tin as the replacement glass. What I didn't like was the two 90 degree elbows you have to use to get through the window. Those elbows will plug with suet/creosote if not kept clean.
And, if insurance happens to come in, they will make you remove it, as it is not an approved method by anyones standards.

First, I would ck your insurance and local codes.
Second, if insurance approves, have an appropriate wood flue and stove system installed.
 
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I would steer clear of a wood burning stove, in your particular situation, if it was me.

When I was in college, I was BROKE. 😆 I rented a small house that had no heater. I somehow scraped up the money to purchase a kerosene heater and it did wonders. Granted, that was a one bedroom, one bath house, but that kerosene heater heated the entire house. If you decide to go the kerosene route, be sure to crack a window for fresh air. Also, I always turned it off before bed. I’m a sissy when it comes to open flames in the house when I’m asleep.
 

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reluctant sinner
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When the chips are down, it could be done safely enough. This is why we plan ahead to avoid the chips are down situations, with better alternatives. However Murphy has a way getting involved in our lives. The more tools in your box of tricks the better IMHO.

+1 with not sleeping with an un-vented oxygen consumer running. I much prefer propane to kerosene (stinks), some fresh air helps, plus it helps cut down on the condensation build up
 

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Several people mentioned insurance, and they make good points.

But when you are in a true emergency insurance isn't going to keep you pipe from freezing and flooding your entire house. It may pay for it afterwords but I would prefer to have a heat source to prevent the freezing to begin with.

Insurance won't comfort you or your kids when you are fighting off frost bite in your unheated home all winter. There also MAY come a time when insurance is a minor worry and simply staying warm trumps everything else. It is possible we may see real shortages of heating fuel and electricity in the coming years, or that they become so expensive you can't afford to heat your home.

I think as a LONG term plan it is pretty hard to do better than to have a wood stove and everything needed to install it, regardless of what your insurance thinks about it.
 

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Lux in Tenebris
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Why not have a pro come in and properly install a wood stove. Might be an enjoyable addition, increase your home's value, save you some heating money...and be a good prep in case of an extended outage.
and can be an extra cooktop source too...

dave canterbury has great vids on using small, portable wood stoves and piping for tents and such...

 

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I think as a LONG term plan it is pretty hard to do better than to have a wood stove and everything needed to install it, regardless of what your insurance thinks about it.
If you live in a remote cabin, a wood stove is the best LONG term plan.
If you live in a townhouse, where you gonna get the wood?
 

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If you live in a remote cabin, a wood stove is the best LONG term plan.
If you live in a townhouse, where you gonna get the wood?
Yes, a lot of people seem to overlook the fact this forum is supposed to be about urban survival.

And yes, if the situation becomes WROL, the HOA may be less of a pain in the butt and insurance issues less of a concern, so a workable "in case" that is not currently usable may make sense as a backup plan if you can do-it-yourself quickly if the time comes. And if you can assure enough of a fuel supply for whatever to be useful. (Note that certain urban areas also have many restrictions about type and amount of any fuel that can be stored, kerosene and propane often among them).
 

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If you live in a remote cabin, a wood stove is the best LONG term plan.
If you live in a townhouse, where you gonna get the wood?
I don't know. Most places in the US east of about the 98th meridian has trees of some type, even in towns and cities there are often a lot of trees. In a real emergency you can burn more than wood in a wood stove. Grass, poop, garbage, part of you house, part of your neighbors house, hummocks from swamps, used engine oil, propane, diesel. I know I can go out and harvest wood if things ever get really bad. I am pretty sure if things get really bad it could become nearly impossible to get liquid and gas type fuels.

I think propane and kerosene and maybe natural gas are good choices for short-ish term. But if it stretches out longer than your stocks last and you can't resupply then they are only short term solutions. Which will usually be enough. I already said in a previous post that a couple propane tanks and a ventless heater is probably one of the best solutions for the OP. But the OP specifically mentioned longer term, when the propane runs out at least twice. So continuing to harp on propane isn't really answering the question.

Putting a wood stove in a town home(I assume town home means it shares at least one wall with another unit, not just a home in town) is for sure a risky and questionable thing to do. I also get the feeling the OP isn't overly familiar with wood stoves. Both are reasons I suggested propane to begin with. But there are possible situations where propane just won't cut it. And with the way things are going(inflation, shortages, strikes, weather, and many other issues) it probably isn't the worst idea to work on being slightly more prepared.
 

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A window is just a hole in the wall. Running it through there with properly done heat shielding is no more risky or less safe than running it anywhere else through the wall with proper heat shielding.
 

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You could just power a few loads thru your service box with a small generator
ive seen small pellet stoves that have battery back up .
It would be hard for any one to see , the pipe just go’s out a small hole thru the wall .
Pellets are easy to Stash .
I think, but maybe not, venting a pellet stove is a lot simpler than venting a wood stove? Never really been around a pellet stove.
 

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There is nothing to a pellet stove some just go out the back with a small ss3” pipe and have a spark arrester with cap . Nothing to it , some have pipes that just go up a little bit .
They have a power vent so it blows the gases out .
I did a small pellet stove a few weeks ago , I dropped a fire proof hearth on the wood flooring . Drilled a hole in the wall and slipped a 4” stove kit thru with a 3” pipe and put the cap on and caulked around the tube .
On the inside I slid the stove in place and plugged it in .
It did not call for any heat shield in the rear . It was very small .
I installed it and had it burning in 3 hours .
 

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There is nothing to a pellet stove some just go out the back with a small ss3” pipe and have a spark arrester with cap . Nothing to it , some have pipes that just go up a little bit .
They have a power vent so it blows the gases out .
I did a small pellet stove a few weeks ago , I dropped a fire proof hearth on the wood flooring . Drilled a hole in the wall and slipped a 4” stove kit thru with a 3” pipe and put the cap on and caulked around the tube .
On the inside I slid the stove in place and plugged it in .
It did not call for any heat shield in the rear . It was very small .
I installed it and had it burning in 3 hours .
The problem with a powered exhaust is, it won't work , or will work very poorly when the power is out.
 

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These can be run on battery back up , easy .
I was thinking of a pellet stove for spring and fall i burn 9 10 months a year .
A [email protected] nite is good to take the chill out of the house .
I would like a wood cook stove . I have a area for a butlers pantry between the garage and the house , it would be Perfect for a smallish cook stove .
I have never lived in a house with any thing but wood heat .
These look good for no power .
Rectangle Fixture Machine Composite material Gas
 

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Sticking a chimney out a removed window is a somewhat common way to put a stove in a house. As long as you follow all suggested clearances and make sure it is stable it can be as safe as any woodstove can be.

Although in my experience even if you have all the parts and tools it isnt a quick job to set up. I would plan on it being an all day job or several day job to set it up.

If done properly or can be pretty expensive if you have to buy all the parts.

For long term it is hard to beat wood for fuel(assuming you have a way to resupply as you burn it) but for shorter term a ventless propane heater and a couple 100 pound tanks is much easier, quicker to set up and probably cheaper than a stove, chimney and heatshields.
What I don't understand is WHY you don't SELL the townhouse and move
away from the city to live free?

WestTxDesertRat
 

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gard'ner
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If you live in a remote cabin, a wood stove is the best LONG term plan.
If you live in a townhouse, where you gonna get the wood?
In my area... Electricity fails because of all the tree damage...
All you need is a chainsaw and a vehicle capable of hauling the wood...
People will thank you for getting those trees off the road!

Ditto on take entire window casement out, put up tin with hole for stovepipe.

I've heated like that for years.



Of course... as said earlier in thread.... might affect property values... easier to get away with in the sticks...
 

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What I don't understand is WHY you don't SELL the townhouse and move
away from the city to live free?
Possibly because living isn't free anywhere and the job isn't portable? Or other obligations aren't?

Doesn't really matter what the OP's reasons are for being where he is. His question was about using a wood stove for emergency heat/cooking in his circumstances, not whether he should chuck his current life for something completely different.

In case you didn't notice, this is the forum on urban survival, not the one on farming and homesteading. Given that something like 85% of the country is now urban, just putting a single sticky here saying move to the wilderness would kind of negate its reason for being.
 
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