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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm thinking of the worst case scenario regarding the loss of power in the middle of dead winter (cold and snowy). I have a townhouse and no fireplace. At this point, I do not want to punch a hole in the wall and permanently install something. But I was thinking about it and was thinking about the best way to have a small wood stove piped through a window? Im sure this has been debated back and forth but my google-fu isnt the best. I have small propane and electric heaters but I am thinking of extended loss of power. Im already building up my wood supply. Did about a pellet stove but dry storage is very limited. Things that are on my mind about this:

1) Make the exhaust pipe long enough to go to the roof of my place to make sure the exhaust doesn't come back in the house.
2) Some sort of fire retardant blanket (stone, whatever) under the wood stove for safety
3) Battery powered carbon monoxide detector
4) Use plywood to cover open window - should there be some sort of sleeve covering the hole? Should the plywood be covered in some sort of insulation to keep out the cold?

Also recommendations for the wood stove would be great. Video link also appreciated. I'm not trying to heat an entire house. Just a smaller room on the main floor where the entire family can be in. But if this is a bad idea, lemme know!
 

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Even though I'm sure it could be done and possibly even done safely, I highly recommend that you consult with your insurance company before you proceed with routing through a window.

It would be heartbreaking to suffer a loss that an insurance company would most surely blame on an "uncovered" heating device.

Sent from my SM-G781U using Tapatalk
 

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You could just power a few loads thru your service box with a small generator
ive seen small pellet stoves that have battery back up .
It would be hard for any one to see , the pipe just go’s out a small hole thru the wall .
Pellets are easy to Stash .
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks all - that's what I thought. I have a Buddy Heater and a handful of tanks in the shed. Was just tossing the idea around about being able to use wood when the propane runs out. Also had in mind getting a bigger tank to supplement the smaller ones I have around here. Having a pellet stove installed had been on our mind - but will see.
 

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I'm not in the same scenario as you, but living in the mountains keeps heat on my mind. I was just looking for a back up plan for my back up plan and came across a very cool video.

I took the idea from the video and modified the plans for my situation. I'll link the video.

You'd be amazed at the volume of heat you can get with just a few modifications.

Hope it helps.

 

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Letting the smoke out will always be a problem, even when it is clean, the hot air will be visible, and you may get visitors. If you have a veranda it may be less visible to let it out there, using a ventilation shaft full of old dust is a great risk... but use your fantasy, look for a boat owen/diesel heater that does work without battery power "Refleks", "Dickinson", "Pyro" and "Tylor" are some makes. Some of them are good for kooking and waterheating too. Having the stove far from where you let the "smoke" out with a long steel tubing will give you more heat.
I have a Tylor diesel stove in a cabin, chosen just because of the small room needed. Has been used for 30 years..
 

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A very long time ago, a young kid on the Navajo nation pieced together from random parts a solar heater that kept his grandmother warm using an ingenious idea. He won an award for it and then the concept disappeared off the internet.

What he did was make a solar powered heat pump where the solar panel ran the water in a radiator. the water was pushed outside to be heated by the sun (in 10 F weather) and then came back in, and a fan blew air over the radiator releasing the heat into the house, keeping it a a toasty 85 F. All the parts were scavenged (minus the solar panel)_ from a junk yard.
 

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Thanks all - that's what I thought. I have a Buddy Heater and a handful of tanks in the shed. Was just tossing the idea around about being able to use wood when the propane runs out. Also had in mind getting a bigger tank to supplement the smaller ones I have around here. Having a pellet stove installed had been on our mind - but will see.
Go to TSC, Rural King, whatever Farm Store. (NOT Amazon for this!)
Get longest MrBuddy 20# hose adapter they have in stock (15ft) AND
get the inline filter ($9 Home Depot or $30 on Amazon)
Tank outside. Hose through that window.
Works GREAT. I use this in Michigan when the power goes out.

Way OVERPRICED Amazon pics for reference:

filter

hose
 

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Ymmv my experience with Mr buddy and 20 lbs tanks is you get 18 hrs. so plan accordingly

The kerosene heater I have I get 8 hrs per 2 gallon fill. So plan accordingly.

I went through a window with a woodstove pipe, don't use plywood. get some sheet tin and give the pipe a 12 inch margin around it be fore it touches something combustible.
 

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Another vote for Mr. Buddy.
Works fine, much safer than a stove thru the window, and it's portable if you need to leave for elsewhere.
 

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that's double wall exhaust piping at the least - triple wall more desirable - factory made thimble for safety >>> make sure you have all the outdoor support strapping for the outdoor run and parts to finish off the vertical stack ...

definitely give thought to the fireplace base and sidewall shielding for non-flam safety
 

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Dead last choice for emergency heating. If you feel you might be forced to last choice during TEOTWAWKI, then a stove and pipe designed to be used in a tent with appropriate spacer/shielding and a very big slab of soapstone or similar for a hearth to stand it on in a large clear space well away from walls.

But short of the Martians have landed and burned off all the fossil fuel and melted the solar panels and wind turbines, you've got to have better options.
 

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A wood stove could easily/safely be done through a double hung window, but your insurance would go crazy!

If you have natural gas (or a big propane tank) install one of Empire Gases furnaces that use a pilot light! The ventless heaters work but a vented furnace is much better! Works just fine without electricity, but does a bit better with the electric fan blowing! They can be vented up through the ceiling or out through an exterior wall!

Installed heaters are great standby heat sources! Setting the thermostat in the low 60’s to mid 50’s keeps your house warm if you loose power while you’re away from your house even if you’re gone for several days!

A high quality Japanese made ToyoStove/KeroSun kerosene heater has been my secondary or sometimes my tertiary heater for many years! Buying used or new old stock is the only option for these quality heaters now! Learn how to run and maintain them and you will have a long term heat source!

Portable propane heaters are an option, but I find way more utility in kerosene!

Setting up places to safely hang LED or propane lanterns and installing a vented furnace or preparing a place for a kerosene heater ahead of time can turn a disaster into an adventure!

SD
 

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Sticking a chimney out a removed window is a somewhat common way to put a stove in a house. As long as you follow all suggested clearances and make sure it is stable it can be as safe as any woodstove can be.

Although in my experience even if you have all the parts and tools it isnt a quick job to set up. I would plan on it being an all day job or several day job to set it up.

If done properly or can be pretty expensive if you have to buy all the parts.

For long term it is hard to beat wood for fuel(assuming you have a way to resupply as you burn it) but for shorter term a ventless propane heater and a couple 100 pound tanks is much easier, quicker to set up and probably cheaper than a stove, chimney and heatshields.
 
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