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Hunter
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Whether bugging in or bugging out. If you live in a place like i do where heat is essential during our long winters you need options. From wood burning stoves to propane heaters. All sorts of different elements would be necessary to survive the winter during a post SHTF. Lets hear your thoughts.
 

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Preparing since 1972
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Whether bugging in or bugging out. If you live in a place like i do where heat is essential during our long winters you need options. From wood burning stoves to propane heaters. All sorts of different elements would be necessary to survive the winter during a post SHTF. Lets hear your thoughts.
My winters are long and cold...I have a propane radiant furnace that just needs propane no electricity...1870's style pot belly wood stove...Electric portable heaters if needed....
 

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This is probably my biggest concern. We only plan to be in this house another 4-5 years, so I hate to permanently alter it in any way that might make it harder to sell. But, of course, I don't want to be caught unprepared either. This past winter we went down to 30 below and had snow cover from October until just a couple weeks ago.

I have an electric fireplace and a couple portable electric heaters, but I don't hold out much hope for them since my main heat concern is not having electricity. We have a propane heater large enough to keep one large room warm and are working on increasing our propane stores. Beyond that, I'm at a loss.

Our next home will definitely have a wood stove and enough land and trees to keep it going all winter. Right now, even if we had a wood stove, I'd have no long-term way of keeping it "fed."

Looking forward to hearing everyone's answers so I can get more ideas....
 

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Weed 'em and reap
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Whether bugging in or bugging out. If you live in a place like i do where heat is essential during our long winters you need options. From wood burning stoves to propane heaters. All sorts of different elements would be necessary to survive the winter during a post SHTF. Lets hear your thoughts.
Already in place:

-Wood Furnace
-Wood Fireplace
-Propane Furnace
-Electric space heaters

Currently under construction:

-Solar Furnace

Currently in design and planning phase:

-Biogas digester
-Compost-heated hot water
-Solar PV syatem

Readily Available Fuels:

-Firewood (min 10 cords cut, split, and seasoned at any given time)
-Charcoal (lump charcoal is easy to make, though more suited to metalworking than heating)
-Biogas (will be up and running before year's end)


Realistically speaking, it would not at all be a stretch to heat with the solar furnaces and firewood. When I was a child, my family heated with firewood, in a house with almost no insulation, and from the age of 9, splitting, stacking, and keeping the woodstove and wood furnace running was solely my responsibility. Now I have a rather energy-efficient house. If I could do it alone as a child, I can do it well enough part-time as an adult.
 

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Gas Furnace and Gas Well (generators fueled with natural gas also)
40 acres of woods, 3 fireplaces and 2 wood stoves.
Propane heaters, 300 gal
Kerosene heater, 30 gal
Electric space heaters if we have power.

Winter Camp all the time, so nice to have heat but not necessary if prepaired.

Basement stayed over 40 F during winter while house was under construction without heat, not bad with sub zero temps outside. So it might not be as bad as you think without heat with a little prep.

Got it covered, I hope.
 

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i would like to expand on the thing about heating with woods in the diff area of the country ..

for me if i had moved to area where there is a extend cold weather of bad weather and snow ..i would look into diff heating system ..but i would go with the best system for use in a long term system as it was need ..allong building of the house that has a been deisgn to a low keyed type of house for make use of all the tricks to keep the house warm in the winter time and cool in the summer time ..
 

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I have nothing to say
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Gas Furnace and Gas Well (generators fueled with natural gas also)
40 acres of woods, 3 fireplaces and 2 wood stoves.
Propane heaters, 300 gal
Kerosene heater, 30 gal
Electric space heaters if we have power.

Winter Camp all the time, so nice to have heat but not necessary if prepaired.

Basement stayed over 40 F during winter while house was under construction without heat, not bad with sub zero temps outside. So it might not be as bad as you think without heat with a little prep.

Got it covered, I hope.
I wish.

Here's a few more characters.
 

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Dust of the Earth
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757 Posts
i would like to expand on the thing about heating with woods in the diff area of the country ..

for me if i had moved to area where there is a extend cold weather of bad weather and snow ..i would look into diff heating system ..but i would go with the best system for use in a long term system as it was need ..allong building of the house that has a been deisgn to a low keyed type of house for make use of all the tricks to keep the house warm in the winter time and cool in the summer time ..
Hank is right, how your structure is constructed makes a huge difference in heating and cooling. IF someone had the time and resources it's possible to build a structure that takes very little human input to keep temps in tolerable ranges.
 

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Road Trip!!!
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850 Posts
Propane furnace and 500 lb tank

Pellet stove that will operate on DC (rarely have very much fuel on hand)

Wood stove and chimney material in storage and 40 acres of pine forest (only 3 acres are mine so that could be an issue)

Mr Heater Big Buddy and 5- 20 lb propane tanks


BIH
 

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Hank is right, how your structure is constructed makes a huge difference in heating and cooling. IF someone had the time and resources it's possible to build a structure that takes very little human input to keep temps in tolerable ranges.
thank you you have hit the head on the nail and for me it the part of the puzzle i wlll never understand about people and there building of the so called long term habit buildin to keep a person safe and warm in the winter time and safe and cool in the summer time then go out and spend the money and do it right the first time and not have to come back years late and keep repeating the same process over and over again each year..

when i was doing the reseach for my place i looked at many diff ways of building from foam wall system sandwich between the wals to rammed earth to multi earthship design to live in for my how ever years i have left on this earth ..but the human must be proplery kept at a basic tempature to be able to live and operating at the design temp to keep us heathly and able to carry out the daily life fuctions that we need to do ..
 

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For my main heat I have a standard oil furnace. For back up I have a 10,000 BTU portable oil heater which requires no electricity, and I have an electric stove that requires no oil. So I should be able to have some heat no matter what. I like oil because I can buy it 5 gallons at a time if I need to.

To help keep my oil bill down, I turn down the thermostat at night and sleep with an electric blanket.
 

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I have 2 sizes of kerosene heaters and a kerosene cooker. I also have 2 small wood stoves. I'm not terribly worried about heat down here in the south. In fact, I don't even use my furnace in the winter. I just bundle up. I can see it being a serious issue in the colder states though and it's something that definately needs planned out.

For those not in forrested area, look into gathering construction scraps, check for people taking out trees in their yards. Both are great sources of wood here. I've set aside several cords just from that. Also, remember that after the SHTF, there's probably going to be a lot of damaged buildings to scavenge wood from down the road. Not to mention trees in abandoned yards, etc. I'm not convinced that scavenging is going to be safe, but it's always good to start keeping an eye out for potential resources now, just in case.
 
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