Survivalist Forum banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,778 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It is that time of year that hazelnuts are ready to be picked. I have a few European hazelnut bushes that i have been watching all summer. I went to pick them and there wasnt a single nut left.

The squirrels got them all.

I did some searching and was able to find a few beaked hazelnut trees but at best i could find one or two nuts per bush.
Plant Flower Leaf Tree Woody plant


I was able to find a nice patch on the neighbors land the squirrels haven't raided yet.

It took about 20 minutes minutes to pick this small batch.
Food Ingredient Recipe Natural foods Cuisine

The nuts are covered on hairs that are worse than fiberglass. I may go back tomorrow with gloves and long sleeves to pick more.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,778 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sorry about the squirrels.
I never realized that's what hazelnuts looked like in the wild. Thank you for the info and posting your pics.
Those are beaked hazel nuts, American hazelnuts tend to grown nuts in groups of three that look kind of like tiny cabbages hanging on the trees.

The trees themselves look very similar to alder brush and grow in the same area and conditions alder brush likes. In the spring they both grow catkins that also look similar, the hazelnut has a teeny-tiny red flower at the top of the catkin for a couple days that helps identify it if you watch it every day in the late winter/early spring. Also the biggest hazel bush is only about 3/4 inch in diameter at its base and alder can get up to 3 inches. Alder has slightly more noticeable dots on its bark when bigger and the dots are more visible on hazelnut when it is smaller.

In my area they are both very common trees that are first to take over in fields and pastures and clear cuts left to grow back into woods.
 

·
Live Secret, Live Happy
Joined
·
17,977 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Have I understood that correctly? You pick the hazelnuts? (provided the squirrels leave the nuts on the bush)
European hazelnuts are not usually picked. The nuts must fall to the ground by themselves. Only then are they ripe. The green outer shell must separate from the nuts by itself. If you pick them, they are useless and cannot be stored.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,778 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Have I understood that correctly? You pick the hazelnuts? (provided the squirrels leave the nuts on the bush)
European hazelnuts are not usually picked. The nuts must fall to the ground by themselves. Only then are they ripe. The green outer shell must separate from the nuts by itself. If you pick them, they are useless and cannot be stored.
I picked them from the trees. It would be impossible to let them fall on their own. There wouldnt be any left because of squirrels.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,305 Posts
Have I understood that correctly? You pick the hazelnuts? (provided the squirrels leave the nuts on the bush)
European hazelnuts are not usually picked. The nuts must fall to the ground by themselves. Only then are they ripe. The green outer shell must separate from the nuts by itself. If you pick them, they are useless and cannot be stored.
If the nut moves in the husk with your fingers it is ready to pick. This is true for European and common American hazelnuts. The smaller American is more difficult to test.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,305 Posts
I've had a lot of luck transplanting wild American hazelnut. I look for a small runner from the larger bush and remove it with as much root as I can. Plant it shallow and make sure to water it often until I'm sure it's happy in new location.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top