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I have had to do this because of extended power outages (up to two days) due to severe weather. Hardest part was toiletries - mainly because refused to go outside in 0 weather and poop in the neighbors yard (wouldn't poop in my own either) but since then have gotten a 5 gallon toilet setup.... tie it off and pitch it in garbage outside and no issues
 

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Had a power outage for 11 days a few winters ago. Gas and water still worked. Thank god for generator. I had 6 extra people in the house as they had no preps. If all utilities go away much harder to do depending on time of year.
 

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Outlander Territory
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Not intentionally, but we always have winter storms that knock out the power for several days. Being in a rural area means that we are last on the list after the towns to get our power back. Many times have been without power for up to a week. No problems, but definitely missed a nice hot shower.

We have electric-independent (mostly) propane stoves that heat the house so we stayed toasty warm at the time. The blowers obviously don't work without electricity but the heating system works just fine. Ran the generator on occasion to keep fridges and freezers cold but put the beer out in the snow!!!
 

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Nemo me impune lacessit
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anyone practiced bugging in and turned the power off for the weekend? seen what life may be like? I don't think I could convince my wife but id like to try it out, see what issues could be encountered.
Lost Boy for us it's more unscheduled practice. The reality is you never know when it's going to happen. How long it's going to last. So too get along with this we have a generator, water, food, light sources always ready to go. Loss of power for the 30 years we've lived here has ranged from minutes to 11 days like seawolf101. These are year round because of Summer wind storms and winter blizzards. The up side to this is it keeps us ready at a moments notice.
 

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Off the leash
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As others have stated we have done it in the winter and spring due to power outages for up to 4-5 from ice storms in winter and bad thunder storms in spring.

Since we live in the country and have a wood stove for heat we stayed plenty warm. We know ahead of time when bad weather is supposed to hit so we just make sure we have plenty of wood in. We have a propane cook stove, but I cook mainly on the wood stove in winter anyway so that was never a problem.

Plenty of kerosene lanterns, oil lamps, candles and such for light. The freezer and fridge we just kept closed as much as possible so that's generally not a problem.

As for water for dish washing and toilet flushing we always have many, many extra gallon jugs of water on hand for things like that as we have power outages at least once a year.

Not a lot different in the spring except I cook on the kitchen stove or we eat things that don't require cooking. We have a chest type freezer in an outside unheated room so it's no issue in the winter and in the spring we just keep it closed and covered if it seems like it is going to get too warm before the power comes back on.

And since we live in a very rural area way off the road, urination can be done outside in the spring to help cut down on the need for toilet flushing.

During out last power outage this Feb. the only thing we truly missed was out internet as it usually goes out when the power does too.
 

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In 2007 we bugged in for 9 days during a massive ice storm. At the time we lived in an apartment. No electricity or heat. The water pipes broke, froze and broke some more - no toilet. We set up our camping toilet. We couldn't use a generator, and there was no fireplace. We covered the doors and windows with bubble wrap and then heavy blankets. We set the small tent up in the living room, with 3 dogs inside it was toasty warm. We had plenty of water stored, and in the afternoons, we cooked on the grill. All in all, I would say we were well prepared. After the first 12 hours, I think we were two of the handful of people still at the apt complex. While others were out spending their Christmas funds on hotels that were open, we were warm and well-fed at home.
 

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We have been bugged out and now bugged in for 8 years. We thought 2008 was going to be the big one when the housing market and finincial disasters happened. We sold our home in the city for a small loss and bought a house on a private lake with 10 acres at a great price. We have been heating with wood , growing a garden and raising livestock now for 7 years . We harvest the lake and hunt as well. Our lake is a giant 209 acre pantry filled with things to eat. Birds, fish turtles, and animals like raccoon and muskrats. We have squirrels, wild rabbits, and hundreds of species of wild birds. We raise Chickens and New Zealand White rabbits. We grow all the food for these animals on food plots on our property. The house is surrounded by thousands of acres of federal forests loaded with Oak firewood.

We have a Generac Propane generator that we test run every couple months to keep it limber. We have a few gallons over 500 of Propane in reserve. We have short term power outages every year and this helps us to test our back up systems. We installed all the generator power for one reason. Long term water for drinking and cooking. Our well is 90 feet deep and needs 220 volts to pump it. Our long term plan is to run the generator for 1/2 to 1 hour per week. The generator uses .94 gallons an hour so at one hour per week we get around 10 years. That matches my long term gasoline storage which will cut us 10 years of fire wood. I am working right now to push that to 14 years by having a 4 year supply of firewood ready to go. We have ten 7 gallon water cans for water storage . We found that we only used 12 gallons of water in 6 days for my wife and I. When I add in my son and his two kids and two Militia members who are bugging out here I see us using about 60 gallons per week for drinking and cooking. We will haul water up from the lake for bathing and toilet flushing. It takes about 15 minutes to fill all ten cans. My wife says we need another couple water cans. So be it. It is still well within our ability to fill them inside of half an hour.

Having a plan first will help you when you run the tests. We wasted over 5 minutes getting the cans out and setting them up to fill. . Once full they are heavy and not easy to move. We learned right away that once filled they sit along a basement wall which helps them stay cool in the summer. . Now before filling we have the caps off and everything ready before firing the Genny. Every minute is important in this long term plan. I f I can save 10 minutes three times I gain another half hour of run time. Having small battery chargers also ready to go as soon as the power is on also gets us the most charge on two way frs radio batteries and cordless power tools. One person will also listen to short wave, ham and other radio frequencies during the power on time.

So yes we practice our plan every year. We have the fuel and components to last about 10 years if we shut the freezer off and can everything in it. I have enough Propane in small tanks to can food for three years. We will have to go to canning on a wood fired jet stove after that . Still working on long term canning . Lids, fuel and things like lemon juice and such. Every time you do a test run you will find things you need. That is how we determine what we buy next.

As for defense my time in the Michigan Militia helped a great deal as I worked with a lot of ex military guys who helped us design our defensive plan. It is a very good well thought out plan of fall back points made up of pits that are in place right now and ready to use.

So get out test your plan and if you dont have a plan get one.
 

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I have not done it with actually killing the power, but have done it with no access to such.

Since my primary plan for many events is to bug in, I am looking forward to new testing of the revised plan I am developing now that there have been some major changes in gear and personnel.
 
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Why is the Rum gone?
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A practice session would be very helpful in finding holes in your plan.
We lost power for 15 days during an ice storm a few years ago.
We learned a lot during that time about our plans.
Both what worked and what didn't, as well as what worked but needed tweaking.

With the safety net of grid power if needed, a practice session is a useful tool in evaluating you preps.
 

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Every winter for about a week. Well water with hand pump off the sheltered deck (hasn't froze off in years), natural gas for heat and cooking (not grid dependent) and lots of hurricane lamps. Kids think its some great pioneer adventure for a day or so then nephew gets antsy and moody because his ipod doesn't work, the TV and game systems don't work. He and his youngest sister are going to have the hardest time in an extended grid down event
 

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Time to melt snowflakes!
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anyone practiced bugging in and turned the power off for the weekend? seen what life may be like? I don't think I could convince my wife but id like to try it out, see what issues could be encountered.
Not without power, but there have been a few winters where it was not safe to leave (or the house was snowed in) so we just had to rely on what we had.

It was enlightening, we made some adjustments too.
 

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I haven't done it deliberately, but have done in for 3-5 day stretches, most of the time in the winter when ice creates power outages. The longest was 9 days and not only was there no power, but there was no city water either. It isn't to hard, but then again I'm more or less ready for it..

If you've never done it, by all means do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
thanks these are pretty good ideas. our area is somewhat prone to flooding I may have to bite the bullet and invest in a generator as I don't think I could quickly can everything in the freezer if the power went out and getting a good supply of gas will probably be my next move.
 

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thanks these are pretty good ideas. our area is somewhat prone to flooding I may have to bite the bullet and invest in a generator as I don't think I could quickly can everything in the freezer if the power went out and getting a good supply of gas will probably be my next move.
If the freezer is full or mostly full and you leave the door closed things will stay frozen for several days, especially if you keep the indoor temperature down. We had a power outtage a couple of years ago, the week before my ordered generator arrived (go figure) and food in my freezer was still frozen four days later
 

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I have had to do this because of extended power outages (up to two days) due to severe weather. Hardest part was toiletries - mainly because refused to go outside in 0 weather and poop in the neighbors yard (wouldn't poop in my own either) but since then have gotten a 5 gallon toilet setup.... tie it off and pitch it in garbage outside and no issues
This made me giggle ... a power outage of 2 days in Oklahoma is a vacation ... :D: Typically, when the power goes out at our house -- which it is wont to do during the Spring (high winds, tornadoes, that kind of thing) and Winter (ice storms, high winds, that kind of thing) -- it's usually out 3-4 days, but I have been without power for a week at a time a few times.

It's not bad in the Spring but Winter add a whole new level of suck***yness ... we don't do the bucket thing ... just empty the bowl and tank and the line the bowl with a waterproof garbage bag ... toss it every night before we go to bed. I always have pine shavings available (use them in the hens' nest boxes) so we'll put a handful or two in the bag after we're done just because I think it helps a bit with odor) ...

The biggest pain for me is cooking outside when it's friggin' cold and or wet outside ... I hate it ... in fact I'll eat cold from the can to keep from stepping out, if I can, but the Old JBT thinks he needs a cooked meal ... :rolleyes: Thank goodness the fast food places around us typically have power (so he can get his fix when he goes out and comes back in from work) ... I'm good staying home and making do here ... so, I guess not so much practice for him as it is for me ...

Plus, not exactly SHTF because I've never had to do laundry ... and the psychological advantage of knowing the power is gonna be back on soon can't be discounted. I might not be so cavalier about my "hardship" if I knew that's the way it was gonna be from now on. :taped:
 

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Bugged out already
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We have been bugged out and now bugged in for 8 years. We thought 2008 was going to be the big one when the housing market and finincial disasters happened. We sold our home in the city for a small loss and bought a house on a private lake with 10 acres at a great price. We have been heating with wood , growing a garden and raising livestock now for 7 years . We harvest the lake and hunt as well. Our lake is a giant 209 acre pantry filled with things to eat. Birds, fish turtles, and animals like raccoon and muskrats. We have squirrels, wild rabbits, and hundreds of species of wild birds. We raise Chickens and New Zealand White rabbits. We grow all the food for these animals on food plots on our property. The house is surrounded by thousands of acres of federal forests loaded with Oak firewood.

We have a Generac Propane generator that we test run every couple months to keep it limber. We have a few gallons over 500 of Propane in reserve. We have short term power outages every year and this helps us to test our back up systems. We installed all the generator power for one reason. Long term water for drinking and cooking. Our well is 90 feet deep and needs 220 volts to pump it. Our long term plan is to run the generator for 1/2 to 1 hour per week. The generator uses .94 gallons an hour so at one hour per week we get around 10 years. That matches my long term gasoline storage which will cut us 10 years of fire wood. I am working right now to push that to 14 years by having a 4 year supply of firewood ready to go. We have ten 7 gallon water cans for water storage . We found that we only used 12 gallons of water in 6 days for my wife and I. When I add in my son and his two kids and two Militia members who are bugging out here I see us using about 60 gallons per week for drinking and cooking. We will haul water up from the lake for bathing and toilet flushing. It takes about 15 minutes to fill all ten cans. My wife says we need another couple water cans. So be it. It is still well within our ability to fill them inside of half an hour.

Having a plan first will help you when you run the tests. We wasted over 5 minutes getting the cans out and setting them up to fill. . Once full they are heavy and not easy to move. We learned right away that once filled they sit along a basement wall which helps them stay cool in the summer. . Now before filling we have the caps off and everything ready before firing the Genny. Every minute is important in this long term plan. I f I can save 10 minutes three times I gain another half hour of run time. Having small battery chargers also ready to go as soon as the power is on also gets us the most charge on two way frs radio batteries and cordless power tools. One person will also listen to short wave, ham and other radio frequencies during the power on time.

So yes we practice our plan every year. We have the fuel and components to last about 10 years if we shut the freezer off and can everything in it. I have enough Propane in small tanks to can food for three years. We will have to go to canning on a wood fired jet stove after that . Still working on long term canning . Lids, fuel and things like lemon juice and such. Every time you do a test run you will find things you need. That is how we determine what we buy next.

As for defense my time in the Michigan Militia helped a great deal as I worked with a lot of ex military guys who helped us design our defensive plan. It is a very good well thought out plan of fall back points made up of pits that are in place right now and ready to use.

So get out test your plan and if you dont have a plan get one.
Great set up. I have a similar set up except I am not on a lake. So I use rain water run off for additional water. We have a stream on our property, but it's a good quarter mile away so the rain water system is great. Have you ruled out augmentation of your power with solar to charge batteries, etc? Something I'm considering but am scared of the costs...

To the OP, yes, you should do the test. You'll learn a lot about what you use and what you need.
 
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I have had to do this because of extended power outages (up to two days) due to severe weather. Hardest part was toiletries - mainly because refused to go outside in 0 weather and poop in the neighbors yard (wouldn't poop in my own either) but since then have gotten a 5 gallon toilet setup.... tie it off and pitch it in garbage outside and no issues
if you have the room, this is where water in milk jugs, soda bottles, etc. come in handy. You can fill the toilet tank and then flush using your non-drinking water.
 

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reluctant sinner
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I have a hook in the ceiling above the tub for the solar shower bag. I have a 16 quart stainless steel stock pot to heat water (melt ice/snow) on the flat top of the wood stove. With a sauce pan and a funnel I fill the 4 gallon bag. I plan to put a hook above the kitchen sink for dish washing.

Propane lantern's provide heat and light. A Colman fuel stove converted to propane will work at -25. I can cook for myself for almost a year on a BBQ tank. With the X who could only cook on full blast we used 3 or 4 per year. I refill my throwaway 1# cans for about seventy five cents.

The 7 gallon Reliance jugs are handy and tough. I only fill them to about 5 gallons these days, due to injuries. I fill them at my neighbors house.

A 12 volt RV pump will move lots of water. I'm using one to pressurize my house system until I get my well pump replaced. Could easily work on a photovoltaic system. I also have 2 LED work lights and my 2 M ham radio on a deep cycle battery system.

A pressure canner with empty jars will take care of the freezer. I use a turkey fryer burner as my power source for canning in my screen and covered summer kitchen. I don't use the big freezer anymore - canned food only needs to be protected from freezing.
 
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