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Discussion Starter #1
Got home last night and found out I need to remove the last 25 feet,its just a straight run of 150 feet,no gates or corners.
It was dark,so no measureing yet,but it seems like a standard 3-4 foot high.
End posts seem a bigger diameter than the supports.
Also has a support pipe running horizontally along the top of the fence.

End post has a "tension" barweaved in,bolted to the post.
Haven't done a search yet,so no clue what I'm getting into.Don't know if I can reuse the end post,guess its cemented in.

Will I need to cut the fence first,or put the new post in before I release the tension.

Bolt cutters,angle grinder,sawz-all?Cut the old ones flush,or remove the cement.

Never worked with it,so I don't know the right questions to ask,just looking for tips or suggestions.:confused:
 

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Dog Lives Matter
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Why do you need to remove 25' of fence? I'm assuming this is chain link fence.

There are straps on the corner posts. Remove the bolts to release the fence. There shouldn't be too much tension on the fence.

The top rails help keep the end posts in place. Remove the top rails after releasing the tension on the fencing.

You can reuse the posts if you do not damage them. I've reused some posts in the past. It depends on how deep they are set and how hard the ground is. I managed to wiggle mine loose after soaking the ground with water.

To reuse the posts with the contcrete footings, dig a slightly larger hole with a post hole digger and then pour water into the hole as you add fill around the concrete footing. Pack it in with a stick. Or you could break the concrete off the posts with a sledgehammer, but that gets dangerous.

If you reuse the posts, I'd leave them in place for a week before you add tension to the fence. Watch the heights of the posts when you reinstall them. Those need to be correct. I had dogs so I installed bottom rails, as well.

1. install posts.
2. install top-rails & keeper wires
3. install fencing
4. apply tension to the fencing

To provide tension, I used a large c-clamp with a 1-inch angle iron welded to the clamp jaw. Reinstall the top rails first, or you will pull the end posts out of line. It doesn't take very much tension. You just need to draw the chain link fencing slightly tight. You should get a feel for the proper

I posted a picture of the tool I made. Note the groove filed into the top jaw. That's for the tension bar. The angle iron slips around the back side of the end post. Some people use a come-along with a tension bar inserted 3 or 4 feet from the end post.




Chain link fencing is not difficult to work with. If you plan to re-use the posts, most of the hard work will be in removing the posts.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
:thumb:I just dove into it and gitter'dun,no welder,but the c clamp idea worked great,I just cobbled something together with it.
 

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CAW!

Great tool idea.

BZ :thumb:

Why do you need to remove 25' of fence? I'm assuming this is chain link fence.

There are straps on the corner posts. Remove the bolts to release the fence. There shouldn't be too much tension on the fence.

The top rails help keep the end posts in place. Remove the top rails after releasing the tension on the fencing.

You can reuse the posts if you do not damage them. I've reused some posts in the past. It depends on how deep they are set and how hard the ground is. I managed to wiggle mine loose after soaking the ground with water.

To reuse the posts with the contcrete footings, dig a slightly larger hole with a post hole digger and then pour water into the hole as you add fill around the concrete footing. Pack it in with a stick. Or you could break the concrete off the posts with a sledgehammer, but that gets dangerous.

If you reuse the posts, I'd leave them in place for a week before you add tension to the fence. Watch the heights of the posts when you reinstall them. Those need to be correct. I had dogs so I installed bottom rails, as well.

1. install posts.
2. install top-rails & keeper wires
3. install fencing
4. apply tension to the fencing

To provide tension, I used a large c-clamp with a 1-inch angle iron welded to the clamp jaw. Reinstall the top rails first, or you will pull the end posts out of line. It doesn't take very much tension. You just need to draw the chain link fencing slightly tight. You should get a feel for the proper

I posted a picture of the tool I made. Note the groove filed into the top jaw. That's for the tension bar. The angle iron slips around the back side of the end post. Some people use a come-along with a tension bar inserted 3 or 4 feet from the end post.




Chain link fencing is not difficult to work with. If you plan to re-use the posts, most of the hard work will be in removing the posts.
 

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I use a tractor to remove cemented posts. A box blade on the 3 point hitch will work for most things to left them partially out of the hole.
 

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I like the way you can untwist 1 piece to shorten or either join pieces to make it longer. Also saw a trick for posts using a chain and an old tire rim.
 
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