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Most competitors and some savvy soldiers don't like a vertical foregrip. Instead, they prefer to point the support hand thumb and sometimes the forefinger as well, down the long axis of the handguard to achieve maximum natural point of aim, muzzle flip/recoil control and to prevent problems while shooting from a rest. I like a muzzlebaked 20" barrel with small ports and a ported carbon fiber handguard w/ harris bipod up front. Slick, light, easy to handle, no snags, dissipated heat, max comfort, max pointability.

We are talking hundreds of a second difference... that gets multiplied by 30-40 rds in a stage = 2.0 seconds or so. With that advantage on every stage, I could win most every match. Not a big deal to most recreational shooters or soldiers but we 3 gunners constantly look for a way to cheat.

One should take advantage if they are serious about their zombie shooting.
 

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There is a new method of shooting being taught to the Tier 1 groups by competition shooters for very fast point shooting. You point your thumb or index finger at the target while shooting. Your body has a natural tendency to align when you are pointing at an object. This is extremely effective when doing CQB work and moving and shooting. This Magpul piece really helps give you a natural grip when you cant your wrist and point your thumb at the target. In fact, if used correctly your off hand is in the same position with this grip as it is when shooting the Isosceles stance with pistol, as is the rest of your torso. Now you use one stance for each of your weapons, and the natural point of aim is greatly increased.
 

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There is a new method of shooting being taught to the Tier 1 groups by competition shooters for very fast point shooting. You point your thumb or index finger at the target while shooting. Your body has a natural tendency to align when you are pointing at an object. This is extremely effective when doing CQB work and moving and shooting. This Magpul piece really helps give you a natural grip when you cant your wrist and point your thumb at the target. In fact, if used correctly your off hand is in the same position with this grip as it is when shooting the Isosceles stance with pistol, as is the rest of your torso. Now you use one stance for each of your weapons, and the natural point of aim is greatly increased.
That isn't new. It's 30 years old. "Tier 1 groups" have just started to pay attention in recent years. The Iso stance has been around since WWII.
 

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That isn't new. It's 30 years old. "Tier 1 groups" have just started to pay attention in recent years. The Iso stance has been around since WWII.
Yes, but the study of biomechanics and how they can be used to aid in more proficient shooting is relatively new for the armed forces. Either way, this is part of that new philosophy.
 

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I have a variable angle foregrip on my WASR- I could easily achieve that angle there. I'll give it a 'shot' sometime.
 

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I have a variable angle foregrip on my WASR- I could easily achieve that angle there. I'll give it a 'shot' sometime.
Try this drill using conventional grip and the methods described above. With just a bit of practice, you will see the difference and wonder what you have been doing all your life.

Place 3 IPSC targets (or ordinary print paper works fine) set 10 yards away and 5 yards apart. Starting position is low ready/safety on. At start, enagage each target with 2 rds each, with A hits only. Your goal is 2.5 seconds with an optic enhanced AR to 4 seconds with a stock M1A with no brake. I can do it pretty easy in 4 seconds with my 308 Tanker Garand. A lot of fun with a .22 LR as well.
 

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That isn't new. It's 30 years old. "Tier 1 groups" have just started to pay attention in recent years. The Iso stance has been around since WWII.
Yes, but the study of biomechanics and how they can be used to aid in more proficient shooting is relatively new for the armed forces. Either way, this is part of that new philosophy.
It's older than 30 years, that's an old, old shooter's trick from way back. Look at the Applegate and Fairbairn styles and you'll see the same thing.
Fairbairn's shoulder point style is that in a nutshell.

Everything old is new again, just repackaged and a little new car smell added.

And what new philosophy? Kill the other guy so he can't kill you? Not new either.
 
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