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Or one of the smaller sub-sets? Are they any good?

I was thinking of getting one and dropping it at some land the family keeps as a backup of a backup without having to add extra buckets and mylar to the list. It seems easy enough.

I'm just starting to look into this, and of course the first thing that pops into my head is that as backup #10 cans aren't all that flexible. They may have a years worth of apples in that can, but once you pop it, you're eating apples for a month with no alternative packaging solution.

Prices seem to go from about a grand to four grand or so.

Any advice is appreciated.
 

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I bought the ultimate year supply from the ready store... I would say it was a good deal. I combined it with my other mountain house #10 cans and then divided it up between my family, my parents, and my sisters family.

we spent something like $9k in total and came out with 3 months food for each family (12 people total).... in freeze dried #10 cans. i don't know if I would totally rely on the #10 cans, but they make a really good addition to the standard beans and rice type supply of Bugout food.


it took like 4 months to get though.... so if you are considering buying one, sooner is better than later.
 

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Pass the beans, please
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I have been tempted to buy one but still have not. We have added a little here and there and probably have over a years worth but I know there will be more folks coming. The garden is critical for our plans and we are planning on doing lots of canning and storage from that this year. It will take a few more years before the orchard is mature but it should produce well.

I did research them before and if you are realistic about tightening your belt a bit I think they would do what they say. I have noted during my research and even here by folks smarter than me that everyone seems to say they won't go nearly as far as you think but that assumes you eat like you do now or don't supplement the stores with other food sources. Food storage is short-term and a good supply of seeds, irrigation, and a garden set-up is vital to making it long term.

One suggestion would be to go crazy planting berries that grow wild all over that property if it will support them. They are not too maintenance intensive once they are established and its a great food source if you can get them to grow on their own. We are doing that on our acreage and have other friends who have a pretty impressive amount of jam going into jars each year with minimal effort on the crop.
 

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I'd have to look at the total number of calories and other nutritional facts first.

Some have a starvation level of calories in a SHTF situation. It might be a good place to start, but I don't think I'd do it without some research.
 

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There is a small one that I've been thinking about, it's all freezed dried stuff. IIRC they claim a 5-6 Month supply for 1 person which it isn't BUT it would just add to my stock/variety.

I'm pretty weak in the freezed dried items and I've added some new shelfs so I might go for it.

I'm a "the more the better" kinda of person as it relates to food storage.
 

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We bought the 1 year supply for 1 person from Sams. It was bought with the intention of being a base to add to our other supplies. It doesn't contain any meat but I can meat to be used with it.

Hope that helps!
Suzanne
 

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The problem I have with the all in one supply kit approach is that many items that are included in them are not things I would have a use for. They do lower the price of buying the stuff individually by including those items. It does make it easy on a person to not have to sit down and work out there own menus and stock accordingly. But that is a problem.

In my opinion, if you are going to properly prepare than you should plan out the foods you want and need. The means the ability to cook/serve the food. The proper methods to inventory and store what you have. If you just buy a bunch of stuff and hide it somewhere are you going to make good use of it when necessity hits?
 

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We bought the 1 year supply for 1 person from Sams. It was bought with the intention of being a base to add to our other supplies. It doesn't contain any meat but I can meat to be used with it.

Hope that helps!
Suzanne
I bought the 1 year (4 person) food supply kit about three months back, from samsclub ($2950). I don't really think it is going to be all that I need (since I am prepping for 5 adults and two small children. I will also buy alot of other food that I will use in my rotation. I might possibly buy another kit in the future, but I will probably start sealing my own rice, beans, etc, myself. At this point I am very busy with work and home projects, so my preps have been partly on hold for a little bit..
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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I have bought several over the years. Both freeze dried and dehydrated. I've also eaten my way through several and learned a few lessons along the way. I've also researched several others based on what I learned from the first ones.

The first lesson I learned is don't ever listen when they call it a "year supply." Take a look at the calories and go from there. Most of them are realistically more like a 6-8 month supply or so. Secondly, take a serious look at the foods the kit contains. A lot of the companies cheat by including cans of sugar and a lot of sweet drink mixes to boost the calorie count. Subtract these calories when doing your comparisons. Only food calories count.

The second lesson I learned is to try to avoid premade entrees as much as possible. Some of them, like the freeze dried offerings from Mountain House are pretty good. Some are horrible. But no matter how good they taste after eating them for a few days on the last camping trip, they get really hard to choke down after living on them for months. It's like trying to live on nothing but the various flavors of hamburger helper after a while. That's called appetite fatique and it can be dangerous.

I learned that I strongly prefer individual ingredients, for several reasons. First off, I can make the foods I prefer. Secondly is variety. A can of freeze dried spaghetti and meat sauce is always going to be nothing but spaghetti and meat sauce. Whereas pasta, meat and tomato sauce can be turned into dozens of other foods.

Thirdly, none of the kits contain the fats that your body needs. You will need to buy them seperately and keep them rotated, as fats don't store long term. This is another place where seperate ingredients come in handy. It's a lot easier to factor your fats into your cooking. It's just downright disgusting trying to pour oil over the top of that freeze dried spaghetti and meat sauce to get your needed fats.

I also learned that I tend to prefer dehydrated foods overall. While the quality of freeze dried is great, there are a lot of places where it isn't worth the added expense. And it is expensive. Dehydrated can cost less than half. And if you're home dehydrating foods, you're creating the same types of foods that you're already storing and using. Since it's an old technology, there are a world of recipes out there that use the dried ingredients too.

If you end up buying one, I'd still suggest some buckets of beans, wheat, rice, etc. Not only will it fill out the kit and make it last longer. But it'll give you more variety. I found that I ended up actually eating that way rather than eating 100% from the kit. And it's how I do my food storage to this day.
 

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MikeK, you said it so much better than I did.

My kit only came with powdered milk, no other drink mixes. I add Tang and Gatorade to my preps. I did come across some whole milk in a box. It was liquid, not powdered and was on the shelf with the powdered milk. It also came in skim and 1%. I have never seen that before.

Suzanne
 

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The #10 cans from Saratoga Farms that I bought from The Ready Store will, according to the folks at TRS, keep for 6-12 months or more after opening them. They have an FAQ on their website talking about this. They say they sample everything that they stock and keep it in the break room for the employees, and they have kept many that long after opening and they are still good.

Hope that helped a little, I have not ordered any of the year supply stuff yet, just individual cans.
 

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Super Moderator and Walking Methane Refinery
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MikeK, you said it so much better than I did.

My kit only came with powdered milk, no other drink mixes. I add Tang and Gatorade to my preps. I did come across some whole milk in a box. It was liquid, not powdered and was on the shelf with the powdered milk. It also came in skim and 1%. I have never seen that before.

Suzanne
Thanks. I don't mind them adding the sugar and drink mixes. Those are things I'll end up using anyway. But I leave them out when doing the actual "how many days of food is it?" and "cost per day" calculations. Sometimes companies add a bunch of them to raise the calorie count then up the price accordingly. By omitting them during calculations, this stands out as a much higher cost per day.

Another trend I've noticed recently is the addition of soups. Some of the soups are the "cream soup" based types. These are essentially just repackaged Bear Creek soups. Which taste good, but have very little actual nutrition or food ingredients. Their calories mostly come from the food starch in the cream soup base. I tend to omit those too, since they're basically just empty calories like the drink mix and sugar. Even though they do make a good base to build recipes on.
 

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The #10 cans from Saratoga Farms that I bought from The Ready Store will, according to the folks at TRS, keep for 6-12 months or more after opening them. They have an FAQ on their website talking about this. They say they sample everything that they stock and keep it in the break room for the employees, and they have kept many that long after opening and they are still good.

Hope that helped a little, I have not ordered any of the year supply stuff yet, just individual cans.
I eat from food storage regularly and most of the items will last at least that long. There are some exceptions such as tomato powder that absorbs moisture from the air and get clumpy. In time this effects the flavor too. But you can always repackage that into smaller containers. If I have problems with that in the dry climate here, it could be a more serious issue in humid areas. So it's wise to consider it and plan ahead.
 

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We have purchased kits in several ways.
We started with 3 one month supplies of MRE from Emergency Essentials to get us started. We figured with what was in the house this would get the two of us 2 months.

We started with the MRE because of not needing water to go with them. We did not have our backup water situation handled at that time and it would work for either bug in or but out. We were also still struggling with that decision.

Then once we saved up enough for the purchase we did the same thing SuzanneTX did and got one of the one year supplies from Sams Club. We were satisfied with most of the Deluxe kit. We did give the Peppers to a friend who loves them. There was no way either one of us were going to eat them.

Like petty much everyone else that has gotten one of these kits we realized that it was not a complete year or 6 months since there were two of us. So we have made a couple of trips down to our Local LDS Cannery. If you have not researched them they come up in about every thread like this and I have yet to read one bad comment on dealing with them. We have used this to fill in all the gaps but one.

The one thing I have had BIG problems with being from Iowa is I am used to large quantities of Beef. Our year supply like all the others has come with TVP (Textured Vegetable Protein). I am less than excited about this.

So my Mom and Aunt got a call that about made them both pass out. I have called up and have asked them to teach me to can. I am going to go over when their garden comes in and help them can all their vegetables this year. Knowing them by doing this I will get a cut of what is processed and will be allowed to use their equipment. Then I am going to change my meat purchasing habits a little. We usually by beef a Quarter at a time because here it is so much cheaper. Being in the middle of cow country by purchasing it in bulk I pay about $2.20 lb. for everything packaged and frozen. That is the out the door price cut and packaged the way I want. I am going to start buying half a cow rather than a quarter and canning my own meat. Cube up the steaks and roasts and make my own. Then we will start canning the meat twice a year and rotating the older stuff into our daily meals. Then when we need something quick instead of having to grab some box of something we can just hit the pantry.

The basic point as I see it and I think the others have stated in their own way is that it is a good base to get you started but is not the magic pill that is going to solve all your problems. Use it as a base and modify from there.

One more thing don't make the same two mistakes we did. One if you are going to get one you are going to end up with wheat of some kind. Don't forget the grinder. That was a duh that didn't hit us for about 6 months till we were working on the second duh.

Our second duh was we never learned to cook from scratch. We thought we were good cooks but it had all been out of a box. Our fist try at making bread was a disaster. We got yeast way too hot and killed it. Also realize that they give you tons of wheat but no butter or eggs or any of the other ingredients you are going to need to actually make more than a few basic things. We have been glad we kept grandma's old Betty Crocker cook book around. Sunday nights are our time to slow down and make something from basic materials so we will have the ability once the time comes.
 

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I eat from food storage regularly and most of the items will last at least that long. There are some exceptions such as tomato powder that absorbs moisture from the air and get clumpy. In time this effects the flavor too. But you can always repackage that into smaller containers. If I have problems with that in the dry climate here, it could be a more serious issue in humid areas. So it's wise to consider it and plan ahead.
I would add to this and say that a decent dehumidifier would be great to have around the house, especially in a food storage area. It could help prolong the shelf life of your dry storage and can be used for other purposes. That's something to think about.
 

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I was just going through my stock of Bear Creek Soup mixes. I use these as a base also. Add meat and either potatoes, rice, noodles and veggies to it.

You just have to know how the kit will fit into your preps. It for sure isn't a buy it and you can cross food prep off your list.

Suzanne
 

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I was thinking of buying a year supply package. But people here talked me out of it.

I was ( am ) worried that the S may HTF any day now and wanted to get a year of food fast.

I found a quick, simple, cheap plan. Beans and corn.

You can buy a years worth of beans and corn for less than $200. Not exactly the gourmet plan but you will be alive at the end of the year and it's almost 2000 calories per day. And it's surprising how nutritious the two are together.

You'll of course need a few other things like a way to cook it and probably a way to make the corn into meal. I'll be going into to that in future blog posts.

Not starvation, just boring. Of course it could be supplemented with whatever else you could come up with.

Once I get this ultra basic plan in place I will start adding to it. First probably wheat and baking related things. Then other things to add variety and nutrition.

I'm writing a blog about it as I work my way through the details.
http://givemetheinfo.com/prepping-f...o-feed-a-person-for-a-year-for-less-than-200/

Right now it's not commercial, so this post is only a little self serving. Apologies.
 

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I have been tempted to buy one but still have not. We have added a little here and there and probably have over a years worth but I know there will be more folks coming. The garden is critical for our plans and we are planning on doing lots of canning and storage from that this year. It will take a few more years before the orchard is mature but it should produce well.

I did research them before and if you are realistic about tightening your belt a bit I think they would do what they say. I have noted during my research and even here by folks smarter than me that everyone seems to say they won't go nearly as far as you think but that assumes you eat like you do now or don't supplement the stores with other food sources. Food storage is short-term and a good supply of seeds, irrigation, and a garden set-up is vital to making it long term.

One suggestion would be to go crazy planting berries that grow wild all over that property if it will support them. They are not too maintenance intensive once they are established and its a great food source if you can get them to grow on their own. We are doing that on our acreage and have other friends who have a pretty impressive amount of jam going into jars each year with minimal effort on the crop.
I agree with you in regards to the garden. I let my raspberries and strawberries go crazy. Not only do I have enough to make different kinds of fruit breads, jams, leather, refreshments, and on, they also provide me with a cash crop since I sell some of the berries and the products at the farmer's market near my house. I'm expanding the grapes and blueberries also. I have a number of vegetable gardens, all in my town lot. Another idea for you is to research the wild edible that grow in your area and plant them all over. I have quite a few and most people have no idea they are edible. I was lucky enough to find a book of wild edible for my area of the country that also includes recipes.
 
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