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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In what ways can one harvest a fallen tree?

I'd like to learn how to work with something that's
dying or dead whenever possible so's to preserve
the living trees when looking for firemaking material.


 

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In what ways can one harvest a fallen tree?

I'd like to learn how to work with something that's
dying or dead whenever possible so's to preserve
the living trees when looking for firemaking material.


All of the pictures I've posted of bark baskets or cordage come from dead trees. As are all of my primitive fire making methods.

What do you want to know, specifically? You can slide off a lot of barks in panels and then use them. Sometimes the barks have to be soaked in hot water or dip momentarily in near boiling water to turn it into a soft pliable noodle of a bark.

When harvesting wood for the sake of firewood, remember "Dead and down, not on the ground." If the tree is dead and leaned up against something it will be a dryer source of fuel than what is directly laying on the ground For the most part, you don't want to use living "green wood" for a fire anyways unless you have a special purpose in it.
 

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On the ground,...depends, it will likely still have some BTU's left in it. Question is, is it worth the hassle/handling. Depends on whether it is "on the move" (your bugging out) or if it is in your BOL (my case).

Inner bark of a poplar/tulip can be woven into cordage. Can be somewhat dead. The one I used the bark on the big trunk was able to peel away, so likely a little dead.

I have a woodlot (10 of our 20 arces), and I do occasionally cut deadwood. I mostly have it hauled in by urban tree trimmers, or by my truck. I have ALOT of old saw logs laying that I will be "cutting to firewood length" while fuel/oil are still available. This is on my short "to do list". I have enough t oheat my home and shop for....probably 3-4 years laying around. I can always split it by hand if necessary, but the fuel/oil could be an issue during any crisis.

I am also, preping my fields for "cropping" if necessary, got a manure spreader and have been hauling in horse manure, and the tree guys bring me tree chips which will also add some nutrient once they begin to decompose just under the surface (disc them in).

We try to maximize EVERYTHING around these parts, even the stuff others "cast off".

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
All of the pictures I've posted of bark baskets or cordage come from dead trees. As are all of my primitive fire making methods.

What do you want to know, specifically? You can slide off a lot of barks in panels and then use them. Sometimes the barks have to be soaked in hot water or dip momentarily in near boiling water to turn it into a soft pliable noodle of a bark.

When harvesting wood for the sake of firewood, remember "Dead and down, not on the ground." If the tree is dead and leaned up against something it will be a dryer source of fuel than what is directly laying on the ground For the most part, you don't want to use living "green wood" for a fire anyways unless you have a special purpose in it.
Thanks GG.

I'm specifically interested first in learning what to use for firemaking.
After that, of course I'd love to learn what else I can do with material
from a fallen tree. I'm big on recycling. I'll go back and revisit your
threads.

:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
When it comes to wood, one needs to remember that hard woods are good for long lasting fires. softer woods burn really hot, but don't last long. Really soft woods make great bowdrill kits and ignite the fire in the first place.
Can't tell you how frustrated I've been with my bow drill set. Never got enough of an ember out of it to lit a birdsnest.
I'll be collecting wood tomorrow. Will look for softer wood for my heath board and keep the drill & sock out of the hardwood.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Try some traditional woodworking.
Bowls, plates, spoons, forks tables, benches, chairs etc.

Bust out the axe, adz,hatchets draw knifes and chisels and let your mind go wild.http://theschoolofthetransferofenergy.com/tag/traditional-woodwork/
Been working with wood all my life. Can't wait to begin crafting it into utensils (instead of into homes).
I could've used a draw knife when I began taking off most of the meat of a bow I'm carving out now.
Had to use what I had...Machete, Hatchet, Knife and to get most of the bulk of the meat off,
I went all Leatherface on it with a circular saw.

Thanks for the link.
 

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Can't tell you how frustrated I've been with my bow drill set. Never got enough of an ember out of it to lit a birdsnest.
I'll be collecting wood tomorrow. Will look for softer wood for my heath board and keep the drill & sock out of the hardwood.
I don't know if you have em where you are but there a tree here called a Cottonwood that's real soft and is good for the hearth and the drill.
 
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