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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i keep reading online that they are edible and easy to collect by just burning away the fluff, leaving the seeds behind. no such luck. i'm usually left with just a smouldering pile of fluff or an ember which completely incinerates the seeds.

i've had limited success with a method i came up with by just rubbing the fluff into my hand above a plate. i definately wouldn't want to be stuck doing that all day :rolleyes:

i thought it'd be fun to see if any of you guys had ways of extracting these things or if we could come up with a way to do it.

i also wonder if, in a bind, you could just eat the fluff along side the seeds? :xeye:
 

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Wild Edibles Expert
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Then you are reading crap online written by incompetent amateurs.

While cattails do produce seeds, it is far quicker to pull up some roots and plant them where you want them tp grow. Nothing produces more starch per acre than cattails. As for the fluff... it is not edible when fluffy. However, early in the spring when still green it can be cooked and eaten.

Visit my website, eattheweeds dot com. I also have a cattail video...

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
yeah, i was beginning to think that it wasn't just MY incompetence :D:

i've actually tried the stalk and root. both were very good. i'm still waiting on the flower stalks to spring up, so i can try them.

maybe i'm a glutton for punishment, but last winter i went out to see if i could collect some rhizomes and it proved very difficult. i even tried setting a fire on top of on to thaw the ground and using a log with a nub, as a pickaxe.

eventually i just gave up and tried another cattail. in certain spots the ground wasn't frozen. just going around, testing the ground with a stick because i couldn't see it through the knee high snow, i found it must easier to collect them. i ended up getting two after two hours of work (a learning experience)

testing the ground with a stick is the way i would recommend going about it. don't even try to get roots under frozen ground unless you have a real pickaxe. :upsidedown:

does any one have any tips for digging out roots in winter? where to find ground that isn't frozen? strangely enough, it wasn't the cattails in the middle of the marsh (the most sunlight) that were easiest to get out. it was the ones along the treeline :xeye:

you're lucky you live in florida and don't have to put up with this, straight razor! :D:
 

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yeah, i was beginning to think that it wasn't just MY incompetence :D:

you're lucky you live in florida and don't have to put up with this, straight razor! :D:
well... the goal is to harvest the rhizomes before the ground (or pond) freezes over. That is what fall is for.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
well... the goal is to harvest the rhizomes before the ground (or pond) freezes over. That is what fall is for.
true, but i think it's still worthwhile to learn how to get them in the winter. at that time, i wasn't trying to make a meal for myself, just to try different things and see what works.

in a survival situation, where i live, there's not a whole heck of a lot to eat in winter (to my knowledge).
 
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