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I know it is probably too early to tell, but how do you think Covid-19 will affect prepping going forward. Do you think so many people will start prepping that stocking up on things like Freeze dried food will be difficult for the foreseeable future? I stopped prepping about a year ago due to complacency, and this was a bit of a wake up call.
 

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There will probably be a small increase in the number of preppers. Everytime there is a disaster people rush out to buy something and usually a year later it is for sale on craigslist (think generators for blizzards/hurricanes). People have short attention spans and memory.

I see there being a back log of orders for survival related items for about 6 months after everything calms down/is over. After that things should be back to normal for being able to buy supplies.

The above only holds true if the death rate does not jump to Italy rates of 1 in 10.
 

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It is definitely a teachable moment, but normalcy bias will kick in as soon as the virus is under some semblance of control.

I'd love to send in a letter to the editor in our local paper encouraging folks to prep, but would rather not advertise to the entire community that I am a prepper by doing so.
 

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I know it is probably too early to tell, but how do you think Covid-19 will affect prepping going forward. Do you think so many people will start prepping that stocking up on things like Freeze dried food will be difficult for the foreseeable future? I stopped prepping about a year ago due to complacency, and this was a bit of a wake up call.
Like with anything, if demand goes up, companies will ramp up supply to meet the demand. You can somewhat get around the wait for that ramping to occur by stocking up on things that ordinary people ignore. Many people go for pre-packaged freeze dried meals but ignore basic staples like dried pasta, beans, rice, lentils, etc, and they also don't typically go and buy things like bulk dehydrated milk, butter, egg, powder.
 

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I'll look at the positive side and say some people will start planning and preparing. I see this meaning more canned foods and bucket foods.

Gardening types and canning. More folks are getting into it this year. The timing of that was perfect. Extra time at the home to care for a garden. I could see some carrying this on to years to come.

More people are getting chickens. I could see people doing this for the next few years as well.

If deer season came in today there would be record license sells. I see a small uptick this fall.

I think there will be some urban folks or New Yorker's won't want to be in that mess again and relocate to a less congested area.

Going forward i think some children and young adults will remember this and there will be some instinctual call to be more aware and ready.
 

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Freeze dried food is simply a nice to have, not a requirement for long term food storage.

There is, and will continue to be plenty of other options for long term food storage available. Not as convenient as freeze dried, however far far less expensive.

Also may take more initiative on the individuals part, ie repack for long term storage. Vs just buying something already to go. Again, normally less expensive anyways.
 

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I think a few will learn and be more prepared in the future but most will not. Look at the ammo shortages we have had in 2008 and 2012. You would have thought gun owners would have made sure they were never caught short again. But once again some are struggling for ammo. The same ones that should have known better.

Next emergency, and it WILL happen again most will be caught short and standing lines and complaining on the net and Facebook that they can't find food and other needs. Some people never learn.:confused:

Freeze dried? I wouldn't wouldn't ever buy it myself. I would rather have canned goods. I saw one YT video and the video poster said he asked a Cambells food rep who was in the store that day how long canned goods would last and the rep said "at least 25 years". So thats what I stock a lot of.:thumb:
 

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In my area, there has been and will be a jump in people who prep short term but very few will make this a lifestyle. I’ve had one friend reach out tho. She’s been worried due to my upcoming delivery and I’ve reassured her that we have everything under control and supplies for when baby comes. It seemed to surprise her that we were so prepared until I reminded her that this is how we have lived for years.
 

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We may hear, "This was a hundred year storm and I am not worried for a long long time".

"I can't afford to prep. The government will take care of me".

Memories fade quickly. Lessons lost...




I honestly believe that the majority of people will go back to living exactly as they did before this whole debacle...clueless and complacent.
 

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Not going to pivot far from Natural Disaster and NBC scenarios although I accept as I get older I will have consider the logistical aspects a bit more.
 

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Our parents and grandparents were preppers, long before the word itself.

They learned that in order to survive, they had to grow their own veggies and can them, barter with neighbors, and learned to cook anything with next to nothing.

My prediction is that a large number of people will learn these all-but-extinct skills and will put them in practice going forward.

-jack
 

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There is more to prepping than buying stuff. Working on skills and knowledge is better use of time than watching Fake News of endless re-runs on Nutfix.

Good time to learn to pressure can food. How to mend/fix stuff.

At some point there will be toilet paper, hand sanitizer and wipes in the store.
 

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as others have pointed out, I think things will go back to normal. After 9/11 it took a total of 4 months for people to act as if nothing ever happened. And only when one person brought it up again would you here an "Oh yeah". I am waiting for things to get back to normal and then will top off my supplies that I am using right now. But in the mean time I am using this time to learn new skills such as canning for when my garden starts producing. I am going to build a permanent smoker in my back yard as soon as I can afford to buy the cement and wood and cinder blocks.
 

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I disagree, Ghost.

Things NEVER returned to normal after 9/11. We have the formation of yet another bureaucratic FLE layer, the DHS.

We have poorly trained teams looking up our keester and rummaging through our carryon in every airport, the TSA.

We have the most over-reaching and unconstitutional Act ever passed by Congress, the Patriot Act.

As a direct result of 9/11, we invaded Iraq and still have ~5K soldiers there to this day - 17 YEARS later.

Remember, 9/11 was an EVENT. Coronavirus is not. It's an ongoing threat and disruption to our way of life.

-jack

as others have pointed out, I think things will go back to normal. After 9/11 it took a total of 4 months for people to act as if nothing ever happened. <snip>
 

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I think a lot of preppers became complacent when Trump was elected as they felt he would be a competent and intelligent leader so they didn't have to worry anymore. In the months after his election, I found such fabulous deals on long term prep food and supplies that it was incredible. I bought all that I could store! #10 cans for as low as $5 from Walmart, Amazon, eBay, and private sellers. It was great. I imagine long term storage food will be available after this, but it probably will be pricey.
 

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It depends.

It is too early to say and it will depend on if this blows over and the "it's the flu" crowd feels they were right, OR if it wipes out a million Americans and we are in a long-term depression due to a studdered economy and quarantines, no travel, shortages of goods.

But when "worst case" doesn't materialize, the non-preppers feel vindicated and less people "get the message." I've read countless messages with comparisons to H1N1, Swine Flu, Ebola, Y2K, etc. that didn't amount to much... so that's the false logic attitude, or "it didn't happen then, so it can't ever happen." They don't factor a lot of behind-the-scenes hard work and some luck to avoid these disasters.

Same is true with gun control. Surges of gun buying when people have some fear of regulations, and then a glut of used guns on the market when regulations don't pass (or oddly even when they do pass). This pattern of gun buying has repeated many times in the last 20 years.

Take heart disease, liver cancer, saving money, unplanned pregnancies, etc. People just are not good in general at prepping, they have normalcy bias, short memories, and a "It can't happen to me" attitude.

IF this is goes on to be a catastrophic devastating multi-million death event where the economy goes into a great depression and there are fears and shortages, it could create a new "great depression" era mentality of saving, prepping, and frugal behavior.
 
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