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aka Mental Avenger
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought a couple of these because they are the smallest focusing LED light I have seen. It is the Luxpro LP130. It uses 4 LR44 batteries, which are small and very common. Those batteries are often sold on cards of 20 or 30 for about $6. It is rated at 40 lumens, and has a sliding focus ring. Every part of it seems to be sturdy and well made. I got them at a local gun store for $4.95. Amazon has a 4 pack for $16.99.

The LP130 would be great to carry in a pocket because of its small size, or put into various packs or Bug Out Bags since it weighs only 1.6oz.
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I can see this as a good first light for kids on camping trips or yard parties around the fire pit, etc. You can tell them to conserve the batteries but of course they won't... at first. :) Could lead to some good 'teaching' moments.
 

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aka Mental Avenger
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The 2hr run time would be the killer for me. Any flash light I'm spending money on now is going to take 18650 batteries, there easy to get for free and charge. They also last way longer than 2hrs.
The advantage of the LP130 flashlight is size and weight, especially for a focusing flashlight. At 1.17 oz, the entire LP130 flashlight with batteries weighs about ½ oz less than just a 18650 battery at 1.64oz. I am going to test the run time on one of my LP130 flashlights. I’ll let y'all know the results.
 

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aka Mental Avenger
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Not for me. If it were rechargeable I’d consider it.
It appears that there are rechargeable LR44 batteries. They come three to a pack with a USB charger. The advertisements are a bit questionable.
 

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aka Mental Avenger
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The LP130 shined for two hours, dimming at the last. Turned it off. Next morning, very bright for a while. Since the main use for such a light is a couple minutes a day, if that, this little focusing wonder will be great.
 

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I would be interested where you get the 18650 for free
The junk battery bin at your local big box store. Between that, old tool batteries, old vacuum and laptop batteries I am flush with good 18650 cells. I believe I have nearly 20. I really wish they made more things you could put your own 18650 cells in.
 

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As a temporary item these will work. I personally don't like items that take unusual battery form factors as keeping up on all those is an issue.

Years ago I made the decision that I would only stock flashlights that take AA or AAA batteries, as I have rechargeables for those, the batteries are cheap, have up to 10-year storage lives, and still enable very small form factors.

I made the mistake (years ago, that led to this decision) of buying a "lantern" that takes D-cell batteries as well as aradio that takes the same form factor.

Batteries: heavy, expensive, rechargeables cost an arm and a leg....with tons of devices today running on AA and AAA batteries, I don't buy anything that takes D cells or C cells.

YMMV, my 2 cents, void in states where it's void.
 

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I keep lots of batteries for outages and shtf-esque events, AAA, AA and a dozen transistor radio ones too. No D cells, few C cells. My flashlights are all beam focus capable LED, one of my portable radios came from a garage sale...transistors, not the newfangled tech from today.
One thing I've noticed is that the cheapie Kirkland batteries are just a tad more prone to leakage than major brands. I watch for this. I've also learned to keep batteries out of flashlights, walkie talkies and radios until I need em. Too many times I've been taught the bitter lesson of battery acid leakage destroyed electronics...
 

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aka Mental Avenger
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
As a temporary item these will work. I personally don't like items that take unusual battery form factors as keeping up on all those is an issue.
I Have several items that take the LR44 batteries, such as 2 digital calipers. Firearm optics and lasers, small laser pointers, and other small electronics. I have many small, compact electronic devices because they don’t take up much space or weigh much, but can do the job. I have found cards of 50 batteries that include AG13/LR44, CR2032, CR2025, and CR2016 for $5.99 at Tractor Supply. I know they are good because I am still using them off a card I bought 8 years ago, and they work
Years ago I made the decision that I would only stock flashlights that take AA or AAA batteries, as I have rechargeables for those, the batteries are cheap, have up to 10-year storage lives, and still enable very small form factors.
I buy AA and AAA batteries in the 60 packs at Home Depot when they are on sale. I have AA and AAA rechargeable batteries, but those are for SHTF and I have several solar chargers for that.
I also have use for large flashlights that take C or D batteries because I want the power and the long run time.
Here is some information: Although AAA, AA, C, and D batteries cost almost as much per battery, the amount of power available is directly proportional to their weight. IOW, a battery that is 8 times heavier, costs 8 times less per dollar for the same amount of power.
Batteries: heavy, expensive, rechargeables cost an arm and a leg....with tons of devices today running on AA and AAA batteries, I don't buy anything that takes D cells or C cells.
I have many devices that use both D and C cell. I also have adapters that will hold 1 or 2 AA batteries in a case that fits where a D cell fits, and another that fits where a C cell fits. Covering all the bases.
 

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aka Mental Avenger
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I keep lots of batteries for outages and shtf-esque events, AAA, AA and a dozen transistor radio ones too. No D cells, few C cells. My flashlights are all beam focus capable LED, one of my portable radios came from a garage sale...transistors, not the newfangled tech from today.
The lights with the carrier that holds three AA batteries is the same diameter as a C battery. But the flashlight that uses C batteries will have more power and run longer.
One thing I've noticed is that the cheapie Kirkland batteries are just a tad more prone to leakage than major brands. I watch for this.
I have had no problems with Ray-O-Vac batteries. I have AAA, AA, C, D, and 9v in Ray-O-Vac. I keep them in the refrigerator and they last much longer than at room temperature.
 

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One thing I've noticed is that the cheapie Kirkland batteries are just a tad more prone to leakage than major brands. I watch for this. I've also learned to keep batteries out of flashlights, walkie talkies and radios until I need em. Too many times I've been taught the bitter lesson of battery acid leakage destroyed electronics...
^^^^ Kirkland batteries are made by Duracell, which also have serious leakage issues, per my personal experience and anecdotal reports. I no longer purchase either.

I am now an Energizer user, no observed leaks.



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aka Mental Avenger
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I am now an Energizer user, no observed leaks.
Interesting. I wouldn’t take any Eveready batteries if they were free. Over the years, at least 5 devices have been destroyed by Eveready batteries leaking. No problems with any other name brand battery.
 

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I have had Duracell batteries leak after less than 1yr in the device and the batteries were less than 2yrs old.

Batteries leaking and destroying devices isnt always true. Alot of that leak can be easily cleaned out. Touch up the contacts with a bit of sand paper and your in business.

My in laws recently brought down all her old toys from nearly 30yrs ago. They all had batteries in them and theres not one that I could not get working properly.
 

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Fenix E12 with 1 AA eneloop battery and a spare battery in your pocket.

  • High - 160 Lumens/1 Hour/223 Feet
  • Med - 30 Lumens/13 Hours/91 Feet
  • Low - 5 Lumens/70 Hours/39 Feet

Or a EagleTec or a Olight or one of many other brands.
Cheap focusing lights = not water proof.
 

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What's the allure of focusing lights?
A good Mid range fixed beam light can typically out perform most any focusing light with a much better quality beam.
 

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^^^^ Kirkland batteries are made by Duracell, which also have serious leakage issues, per my personal experience and anecdotal reports. I no longer purchase either.

I am now an Energizer user, no observed leaks.
I've had exactly the same experience! I quit buying Kirkland batteries a few years ago, but now I've wrecked several flashlights and other devices with Duracell's, just in the last few months. With batteries well within expiration date. I will not buy them anymore.

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