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Water, water everywhere and nar a drop to drink - is a classic statement from the rhyme of the ancient mariner. But in the case of urban survival, there is no water and there is nothing to drink.

Most urbanites depend on water supplied by the city - through the cities water system. However, this is also a weak point in disaster planning. Most cities and towns have prohibited their citizens from digging private wells. If that is the case in your area, its time to get the laws changed. Not being able to have your own water supply makes you and your family a slave to city. Free people do not ask permission to use something that is on their own property - or in the case of ground water, under their property. Slaves as permission, freemen use what is theirs as they see fit.

Depending on the area where you live, that will define how deep the well has to be. If you are planning on installing a water pump, go ahead and get it set up for an electric water pump as well as a hand powered pump. This would include a housing for the pump to go in, ground rod and maybe electrical wiring.

Instead of a hand powered pump, a solar powered unit could be installed and the solar cells could be placed on top of the pump house. But in this article, we will just be discussing hand powered pumps.

Studies from developing nations show that 90% hand powered water pumps break down within 3 years. This mainly due to worn out or broken parts. In the case of hand powered pumps, what you pay for may very well be what you get. So if you plan on installing a hand powered water pump, do not buy the cheapest product on the market.

The way these pumps work, there is a piston that moves up and down in a shaft. The lever from the handle provides the force needed to bring the water to the top of the line.

When deciding on a water pump, be sure to pick a unit that is designed for the depth of your well and the capacity that your and your family needs. In a worse case scenario, and the pump is your only source of water - will it provide enough for your needs?

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the average US family uses 400 gallons of water per day. Most of that goes to watering lawns and gardens. During a disaster, the grass can die, but the garden will need water.

Some things to take into consideration:

Personal hygiene - hand washing (is the number 1 way to prevent the spread of disease), brushing your teeth, taking a bath or shower, washing your hair, feet, groin area. All of these are important to help prevent skin infections and the spread of disease.

Physical activity - more work means more water requirements.

Pets and live stock - they need water to. The larger the animal, the larger the water requirements.

Garden - in times of drought, the garden is going to need water.

Some of the big questions are: how many family members and friends will be sharing the pump, how many pets and types of animals will the pump need to support, how big is your garden.



Lets take the garden and animals out of the picture and go from there. For personal hygiene, drinking water and household pets, lets put an estimate of 5 gallons per person per day. Keep in mind, that is just a rough estimate. Its easier to do the math on 5 gallons per person then 6 or 7 gallons per person. So to keep things simple, lets just say 5 or 10 gallons per person - per day.

Each person should have their own water bottles - and do not share bottles between people. This is to help control the spread of disease. After the bottle has been emptied, leave the cap off and allow the inside to dry. This will help prevent the growth of mold or bacteria inside the bottle.

Depending on the depth of the well, the water may be up to 20 degrees colder then the day time temperatures. This can really be nice during the July and August hot summer months.

Minerals in the water table will affect the taste. If there is Sulfur in the area, the water might have a sight disagreeable taste. To help remove some of the funny taste, consider getting some water pitchers with a built in filter.



Every human being and every living thing on the face of the earth needs water. In a survival situation, whether its urban or rural, every person in the unit will have needs for water. These needs go past just "drinking water" - there is hygiene, hand washing, cleaning of wounds, watering of pets and livestock, watering the garden,,,,,, the list goes on and on.

For basic survival, three things are required - food, water and shelter. But when the nearest water supply is miles away, what are people to do? Its either take the water buckets and pack the water several miles from the nearest lake or stream, or have your own personal water well.

With drinking water from lakes and streams also comes the risk of water borne infections, such as typhoid, cholera and polio - only to name a few. Drinking water from a well is less likely to be contaminated with diseases. Not to say that its impossible, but its less likely.

Please post your comments, thought and opinions.
 

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Depending on where you live, rainwater harvesting can be used for the garden and livestock. It is often easier than pumping the amount of water you will need by hand.

Up here in Wisconsin a windmill is better than solar just because we don't have the sun and wind has been used for a couple hundred years to pump large amounts of water for livestock.

At my summer kitchen I have a hand pump that was put in in the '50s and it is still running strong. I have to change the leathers every few years but the pump is in no danger of breaking. My home hand pump was put in in '88 and again is still going strong. Keeping a few spare leathers is good, store them sealed or in some sort of cooking oil to keep them from disintegrating.

When not in use the pump should be covered. If not used for a long time it needs to be covered well because mice will nest in the pipes.

If not used often the hand pump will need to be primed. Never drink all of your water because you may need to use it to prime the pump. Drizzle water down the pump while pumping the handle until it "catches" or until you can feel the water pressure rising.

Pumping more than 10 to 15 gallons of water at a time is exhausting even if you are use to doing it. Putting a brace stone for your foot to press against as you get tired is a good idea. Taking turns is even a better one.

It is also noisy and attracts attention. If it outside and your neighbors live close, they will hear you every time you get water.

I can't think of anything else right now. At home I have a windmill to drive the water. I simply connect it when I need water and disconnect it when I don't. The windmill will always pump as long as the wind is blowing so unless you have different pipes leading to different sources you will need to have the ability to disconnect the well from the windmill or else it will flood your house. Believe me, I've had it happen more than once.:eek:
 

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Ringin Your Gong From 600
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I've got a sandpoint well myself, and by the looks of it I have the same pump as you Kev. Works like a champ! :thumb:
 

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Ringin Your Gong From 600
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Where can you buy them? How much are they?
I got mine at Harbor Freight for about $30. I didn't trust it, so I actually tested it in a tub before really testing it. It does the job on my 20 ft well. I need to buy a back-up as well to feel safe.


Note: They sell 'em on eBay but at a mark-up and a ton for shipping usually. Same exact thing, so I'd recommend buying from the source.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I've got a sandpoint well myself, and by the looks of it I have the same pump as you Kev. Works like a champ! :thumb:
Its really my dads pump. I just took the pictures.
 

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I like the idea of a well, but im not sure where to start.
I know this sounds like a stupid question but wouldn't the water be muddy and dirty. do you need to treat the water before drinking it, if so, How?
 

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ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒ&
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You avoided my question. Why? If its yours why do you pay for it?

Free people dont ask permission is what you posted. You pay taxes and need a permit to do anything on your property legally. If you decide to add on to your trailor you need a permit and will pay for it. So dont tell people you dont need permision silly rabbit.

P.S I dont pay taxes. Silly rabbit.
Psssst. the taxes that Kev and I pay not only cover roads and schools, they also pay for the prisons that you will go to for not paying your taxes. They also cover the police to arret you and the judge, DA and courts to prosecute you.

Silly wabbit. Its wabbit season!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
P.S I dont pay taxes. Silly rabbit.
That makes you a parasite on the rear end of society.



I like the idea of a well, but im not sure where to start.
I know this sounds like a stupid question but wouldn't the water be muddy and dirty. do you need to treat the water before drinking it, if so, How?
No - the water will not be muddy. Unless you have some poor quality ground water. Its probably going to be the purest water you have ever drank.

Treatment - some areas have had their ground water contaminated. This can be through dumping of chemicals, land fills,,,,,. Some areas have sulfur or iron or other minerals in the soil that can leave a funny taste to the water.

I recommend you contact a water well drilling company in your area and the local water district. City hall would be a good place to start, or the county clerks office and tell them you want a water well dug.
 

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Prophet
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nice post Kev.
i looked into drilling a well in my area. Apparently if i am in town where there is a water system already in place, i HAVE to connect to it and cant drill a well legally. Same goes with sewer. apparently they made a few restrictive laws here.
Im ****ed, to say the least. :mad:

peace
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
nice post Kev.
i looked into drilling a well in my area. Apparently if i am in town where there is a water system already in place, i HAVE to connect to it and cant drill a well legally. Same goes with sewer. apparently they made a few restrictive laws here.
Im ****ed, to say the least. :mad:

peace
I do not know your local rules and regulations. But "sometimes" if you explain that the well is just going to be for watering a garden or for watering live stock, then you can put it in. There might be some paper work to fill out, and make a statement that the well is to be used "just" for the garden or livestock - then sometimes you can put it in.

But, local rules and regulations change from place to place. Some areas may not make an exception for gardens or livestock.

Depending how far you wanted to push it, maybe the city council needs to be approached and the matter discussed with them.
 

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WHo would put in a sandpoint well?

Are the sprinklers companies doing them, the regular well drillers, or do you do it yourself?

You put in a sand point yourself. Most home stores sell the drive point, cap and connectors. You put the cap first onto the drive point and drive that into the ground with a sledgehammer or a fence post driver. Then you take off the cap, connect another section of pipe to the drive point, put the cap onto that section of pipe and pound that into the ground. You keep doing that until you hit water. The reason many people call them sand point well is because that is the kind of soil they work the best in. If you lots of BIG rocks, you would have a hard time putting a sand point in.
 

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Ringin Your Gong From 600
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WHo would put in a sandpoint well?

Are the sprinklers companies doing them, the regular well drillers, or do you do it yourself?
Yeah, what Lone Squirrel said! :thumb:

Best to talk to folks and find out how deep you need to go to hit the wet stuff though.
 

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Just A Shadow
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WHo would put in a sandpoint well?

Are the sprinklers companies doing them, the regular well drillers, or do you do it yourself?
If the water table is within 24 feet you can do a sandpoint well yourself. Home Depot sells the points and they have instructions. We did one to 35 feet.

Those small pitcher pumps can only lift water 24 feet max so your water needs to be close to the surface.

Check with local well drillers or the county for how deep the water table is in your area.
 

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Its a good idea but - I hope you use a UV light to kill the e-coli bacteria kev and arisinwind. You should be at least 18" above grade and no openings to allow bacteria like spiders,snails,frogs,weeds, etc.. Like in kev's wood lid. and arisnwind ground water runoff that can carry bacteria down the well.

Just my 2 cents
 
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