Survivalist Forum banner
  • Are you passionate about survivalism? Would you like to write about topics that interest you and get paid for it? Read all about it here!
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Sorry About Your Feelings
Joined
·
20,837 Posts
Wow thanks for that name.



... can't believe im saying that. :D:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
525 Posts
I have the Freeplay (Freecharge), a regulated 12 volt hand crank charger, cost about 30 bucks, seems to work, seems durable.

The Freeplay is a sophisticated hand crank alternator, very efficient, with a gearbox designed (life tested) for hundreds of thousands of cranks. The Freeplay comes with an attached automotive cigarette lighter socket, easy to drop in a pack or coat pocket. Any electronic device you have the car adapter for, can be recharged.

The output voltage is 14.2 volts (DC) at about one amp, similar to your cars, cigarette lighter voltage when the engine is running. You could not crank the thing for hours, it becomes work after a few minutes, but it works well for most things I have tried to charge. I have recharged my satellite phone and cell phones, and powered several other electronic items for fun.

Note most cell phones limit the battery charging current, so they can stay plugged in 24/7, that means it is also limiting your recharge current, so it takes a while to charge.

I have also built a bike type pedal charger, the advice above is correct, most DC motor would work, but do select a motor RPM rating you can match to your gear ratio or else the output will suffer. If it is a 200 RPM motor you need to spin it at that RPM to maximize the output. You can expect to get pretty significant power from the DC motor, say 10+ amps or so, and your legs can produce more power, longer than a hand crank.

The downside is we humans do not crank out much power before we get tired. You can reasonably expect to be able to crank out 25-30 watts for a while, but not hundreds of watts all day long.

In an emergency both would be a real plus, it depends on how much power you need.

PS, I would also recommend adding a voltage regulator circuit to the bike generator so you can directly power a device and not just recharge a battery.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,560 Posts
I have the Freeplay (Freecharge), a regulated 12 volt hand crank charger, cost about 30 bucks, seems to work, seems durable.

The Freeplay is a sophisticated hand crank alternator, very efficient, with a gearbox designed (life tested) for hundreds of thousands of cranks. The Freeplay comes with an attached automotive cigarette lighter socket, easy to drop in a pack or coat pocket. Any electronic device you have the car adapter for, can be recharged.

End Quote

Sounds good. Where can I get one?

later
wayne
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,101 Posts
I was just talking with a friend last night, who has been in the design stage of just this. Several years designing, prototype working and going into production in just a few more weeks. All made in the U.S.A. with super windings, magnets etc. Contact me at my email address below and I will put you on a notification list when they are ready [email protected]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
268 Posts
Buy an old bike
Buy a DC motor
Buy a charge contoller
Buy a 12v deep cycle battery
Buy a power inverter

Add them all together

bicycle powered generator.
exactly what I thought when he asked too :thumb:. Unless of course he is looking for a portable method.

I took a very old exercise bike that cost me nothing and added a 24v dc motor I got for about $10 to it using the Gaterback AC belt for my truck. The belt was my new replacement that I will switch out with the old one in a couple of weeks so the old belt will work perfectly for the job but would have been thrown away anyway. With that 24v motor I can easily pedal and get 14v consistent to charge or run things from a battery without having to have very high rpm. This particular bike also worked out well as it had the chain from the pedal sprocket and a sprocket that had the large wheel attached to it that used to have a piece of belt like fabric that would apply tension as you adjusted the knob to increase resistance. That wheel fit the AC belt perfect and the dc motor had a nice groove that also fit the v belt.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
268 Posts
here is the second motor I have as a spare to give you an idea of what to look for and the size. I put it next to my cell phone so you can see the size of this one.

There are many out there you can get from all sorts of things like old tape drives, treadmills, vacuum cleaners etc but the best to look for are high volts low rpm to make it better for generating power. If you want to charge up one battery then a 24 volt is best but as you start going up in the number off batteries you have in a bank you have to increase your volts. I dont remember the exact the rule of thumb I was told before for generating your needs for each battery but I will try to find it. I think it was 26 volts needed for 2 batteries and so one.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
268 Posts
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top