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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Over the past few years I have been trying to stock up on those hand crank flashlights and lanterns. But instead of having a bunch of them at my home (which I do), I have been bringing some of them to "the camp".

When my family and I go to the camp, sometimes its after dark when we get there. After we arrive, I will grab a flashlight to go turn on the propane. I do not want to have to worry about dead batteries in the flashlight.

There have been a few time that thunder storms have knocked out power at the camp. I do not like looking around for extra batteries in the dark - especially when we have mouse traps set out.

Its very convent to grab a flashlight, shake or give it a couple of twist, and you have instant light.

Here is one of the issues, it might be 2 - 4 months between trips to the camp. That gives the batteries in the flashlights a long time to go dead.

Also, if you leave those cheap batteries in your flashlights -the ones that leak acid - your gear can be ruined before you know it. Just the other day I found an AM/FM radio that the batteries had leaked in and ruined the device. The radio was a cheap one, so its not a lot of money lost, but it is a piece of equipment that will need to be replaced.

I have heard of long term storage batteries, ones that you can keep stored for decades,,,, but why? I see no real reason to invest in stuff like that. They are going to go dead after you put them in the flashlight anyway.

The crank flashlights make good hand outs to the kids. If the light gets set down and the batteries go dead, just give it a few shakes or twist. This past weekend while on a camping trip with my daughter, I gave her a twist flashlight to keep in her tent with her. I told her to twist the end to charge it up, and she was like "ok, no problem."



Over the years I have tried a bunch of different lighting solutions for the camp - everything from rechargeable lights that you plug in, to buying high quality batteries.

One thing about batteries - they all go dead sooner or later.

With a place that a family shares, you never know who has gone there and how much the lights were used.

One example - my brother could have gone to the camp and used the flashlights a lot. A couple of weeks later I go, and the batteries are almost dead. I did not know that my brother had used the lights, and he did not tell anyone.

To keep things simple, I think having some hand powered flashlights are the best way to go. They may not be as bright as a regular flashlight, but they work when you need them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Great post!

If you can get one, the hand-cranks that also have the solar are your best bet. I got an Eton FR150 hand-crank/solar radio/flashlight that I sit on my window sill all of the time.
That eton radio has a red cross on it? Red Cross? Your kidding right?

http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=57

I dont want to highjack my own thread, but the red cross is not very high on my list. When southeast texas needed help after hurricane Rita, the red cross refused to help. They would not even setup a food line or a shelter here.
 

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Here is one of the issues, it might be 2 - 4 months between trips to the camp. That gives the batteries in the flashlights a long time to go dead.
That's why you buy better flashlights that use CR-123A batteries that have a shelf life of 10 years. My flashlight dedicated to home defense goes months at a time without being touched, not an issue at all, still bright as hell when I hit the button.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
flashlights

That's why you buy better flashlights that use CR-123A batteries .
I can not justify buying flashlights that do not use standard batteries (AA, AAA, C and D).

Just about all of my gear (except cameras) use a standard battery. I'am already setup with chargers, gear, and a good supply of rechargeable batteries. I have no idea on how much money I have spent on just AA rechargeable batteries. For christmas I got 2 chargers that recharge AAA - D, plus the 2 chargers I already had.

I can not not/will not rebuy everything (chargers and batteries) just for a couple of flashlights.
 
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Long Trump
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Carbon Ultra-Capacitor vs Batteries

I did some checking recently on rechargeable flashlights. All battery types will fail at some point. Then I found a capacitor flashlight. The LightStorm CL1 crank flashlight uses a Carbon Ultra-Capacitor to store energy - all other crank flashlights use non-replaceable rechargeable batteries. This seems to be the ultimate crank flashlight, and it also recharges cell phones:

http://www.eco-outfitter.com/p-277-lightstorm-cl1-crank-flashlight.aspx

Lightstorm vs Nighstar Flashlights: "..... LightStorm wind up torch lights on the other hand are significantly brighter because they incorporate a 1/2 watt Quasar LED which is powered by a 30 farad Carbon Ultra-Capacitor. The larger capacitor can be used in LightStorm flashlights because the dynamo generator produces far more energy then the linear generator used in NightStar flashlights. LightStorm flashlights also have more features than NightStar flashlights....."

Anyone have any experience with this?
______________________________________________

"The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants. It is its natural manure."
- Thomas Jefferson 1787


Paraphrasing Margaret Thatcher - Socialism works until they run out of other peoples money.
 

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What are the battery life of the hand cranked. I have 2 Black and Deckers that have AM/FM/Weather, a light and cel charger (no adapter for mine though) and no matter how long I crank, the light lasts a few minutes and the radio not much longer.

They do accept AAA batteries, but I'm talking about the internal battery charged by the crank.
 

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Long Trump
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What are the battery life of the hand cranked. I have 2 Black and Deckers that have AM/FM/Weather, a light and cel charger (no adapter for mine though) and no matter how long I crank, the light lasts a few minutes and the radio not much longer.

They do accept AAA batteries, but I'm talking about the internal battery charged by the crank.
This is why I don't like rechargeable battery devices - they go bad just like you say. The LightStorm CL1 doesn't have a battery. According to the specs, the LightStorm with 2 minutes of cranking fully charges the capacitor power cell and can be recharged over 100,000 times for spot light duration on a full charge of 15 minutes or flood light duration on full charge of 20 minutes.

On a side note there is a lying dictator on Fox News right now being interviewed on destroying the Constitution :mad: !!!
 

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Kibitzer
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My first "squeeze" flashlight was a Russian one. Didn't have a "battery" in it, you had light as long as you could squeeze the handle/crank.
One year I bought everyone crank lights from JCP, around $25 each. They lasted for a year. I got some $5 cheapies from a book club that have lasted for five years.

If you have any battery fed items in car, keep the batteries out of them. Otherwise you'll have a ruined item, I replace the batteries every year. Keep them in ziplock bag taped to flashlight. Otherwise there's a cheap crank in glovebox. Had some batteries leak in my handheld CB the other day. Dang it.

I looked in a trip planner with button cells in it, one of them looked "wet".
 

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Survival Actual
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I've survived a week without electric here after a hurricane. By the end of that week, i had NO working flashlights, because i had no way to recharge them. (this was before i bought inverters and a generator) But generator fuel runs out too!

Shake or crank lights might not be the best choice for every day tasks, but when you don't have any batteries or fuel left, you'll be dam glad you have them.
 

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Christian
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Take a look at this one:

http://www.9voltlight.com/inc/sdetail/11890

I have purchased two so far.

With the edition of a 9vdc lithium battery they will literally stay lit for one calendar year. There small and not very expensive.

I know that batteries will eventually go dead but I can last a long time with this light and adding a solar charged 9vdc battery to my BOB.
 

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I can not justify buying flashlights that do not use standard batteries (AA, AAA, C and D).
What good is sticking with these standard sizes if they're going to go dead after a few months of sitting around, rendering the flashlight unusable when you need it? I won't buy another flashlight like that again, most are turds compared to the CR-123A powered ones.
 

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an issue i just thought of about crank vs. shake would be one handed operation. while it may be do-able to crank a light with one hand, i sure would prefer to shake one to gain some more light while using the opposite hand to work with.

i've invested in some small crank lights and i must say, other than my headlamp, i'd prefer to use them. just as bright as my other led lights and the comfort factor of not needing batteries is great.
 

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I've survived a week without electric here after a hurricane. By the end of that week, i had NO working flashlights, because i had no way to recharge them. (this was before i bought inverters and a generator) But generator fuel runs out too!

Shake or crank lights might not be the best choice for every day tasks, but when you don't have any batteries or fuel left, you'll be dam glad you have them.
Small solar chargers are cheap. They're a good way to keep things running.
 
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