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I have always used a tent when I camped, but have been getting more and more interested in the high speed, low drag of hammock camping.

I purchased both a net type hammock and a parachute material type. I'll be testing both out this summer. I also grabbed a nice tarp to cover it all up. It rains a lot in south Mississippi. The parachute type has a bug net, but the regular net type doesn't. Not sure how that is going to go and may end up buying a separate net to go with that. One main advantage of hammock camping that I see, in the south at least, is that the weather is warmer here so a large sleeping bag really isn't needed.

So camping this way should be an adventure. If you have some tips or tricks I welcome them
 

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If you can or want to learn to sew you can knock some money off doing a lot of those pieces yourself. That said there is a lot of cottage guys that can make lightweight gear for a decent price, especially considering the time involved.

Don't skimp on insulation for the bottom half, the under quilt. Most people will be too cold to sleep at 60F with no bottom insulation. They assume because they can do it in a house it will work outdoors. A slight breeze and general convection carries away that heat quickly. A pad or piece of reflectix can help. Not sure if you did sleeping bags or quilts when tent camping. For hammocks they become two pieces generally. The top quilt and the under quilt.

The pair is generally a bit heavier than a sleeping bag would be but you usually get weight savings in the lack of a sleeping pad plus tent weight savings when moving over to a hammock. Only other major choice, and that's relative, is how you intend to hang. What suspension system. That mostly comes down to personal choice. Do use at least 1" webbing tree straps for hanging. Thinner webbing or line can girdle the bark and damage/kill the tree. Otherwise same usual camping advice. Quilt ratings are usually "I'll keep you alive and not comfortable" temperature value so always leave a margin when picking one.
 

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reluctant sinner
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You might poke around on the hammock forums. My back doesn't enjoy them all that well and I like to sleep on my side plus move around a lot.
 

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Yeah, hopefully they work out for you. I don't mind tents but my back has never been pleased on the ground. Which is weird cause if we are out somewhere and there's not enough bed space I'll be the first to sleep on the floor and be fine.

Hammocks solved the back issue for me, I get a little calf pressure I don't care for but for me that beats back pain. Hammocks do tend to be more finicky. So you may end up needing to tweak the length or width of the hammock or ridgeline to find that sweet spot. Tents tend to be more forgiving. Plop them down and crawl inside.

I would certainly say to find some trees and spend some time, more than a few minutes, hanging at a few different lengths and such to get a feel. XL wide hammocks can work for side sleepers too. I usually start on my back but end up on my side during the night. My 68" wide hammock deals with that better than my 58" standard. A little less calf ridge pressure too.
 

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Back in the day when my friends and I would do weekend hiking/camping trips that's all
I ever used was a hammock, mine had 4 tiedowns so it wouldn't swing and roll me out if I moved around and it had a screen around it for bugs and critters.
Only way to camp in my opinion
 

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Net types leave marks in your skin. Trust me, I used one for a decade.

Parachute are good, but mosquitoes can bite through them.

If you want absolute high speed, net hammock with sleeping pad.

Videos from 2008, absolutely terrible quality by today's standards:


 

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I've yet to find one that's comfortable, but I'm a side/stomach sleeper. Hard to sleep on your stomach in a hammock, LOL.
 

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I've yet to find one that's comfortable, but I'm a side/stomach sleeper. Hard to sleep on your stomach in a hammock, LOL.
The diagonal, asymmetric hammocks will allow you to side-sleep and what I've found most comfortable.

It's to the point now, that you can buy quality hammocks with suspension very inexpensively; the best way to figure out if you actually like them or can sleep in them. My wife and I do a lot of backpacking and all we use are hammocks (except during the winter months). Find your comfort range. I pack a small section of Z-Rest (folding) sleeping pad and use it inside my hammock; it covers my neck to the bottom of my bum. I've become soft over the years, so if temps are below 55-degrees, I add an under-quilt to my packing list. However, in hot/humid temps of the summer, you will sleep far more comfortably in a hammock than on the ground.

Don't skimp on your rain fly and learn to assess tree/anchor distances quickly and how to put up your fly quickly. There's a huge hammock community and 100 ways to do everything. Don't overthink it.

Get a simple inexpensive hammock. If you have issues with mosquitoes; get a one with a net or an aftermarket net. Whoopie sling suspensions are very simple, but use them with tree straps. Understand pitch angle and find where YOU ARE most comfortable. Hammock height for me is not very high; I like to use my hammock as a sitting chair or lounge chair. Learn how to get I and out of a hammock...it's simple, but if you don't figure it out, you'll learn why when your groggy at 0300 with a Mother Nature call...those lessons are unpleasant.

Make sure your rain fly has full coverage! Getting soaked in your hammock isn't fun, even when it's not that cold outside. Unless it's just a day hike and I plan to lounge in my hammock, I always put the rain fly up. Most allow you to fold it back and out of the way for maximum air flow, but you want it setup to quickly cover you up when it starts raining at 0100...ask me how I know:xeye:

Even when you think it's too hot to need a quilt or blanket, having something (even if just a light poncho liner). With a breeze, you will likely getting chilled even if it's 70 degrees at night.

Every season, I treat my hammock (and a small, partial net) with Permethrin. It works well. If mosquitos are really bad, consider a double layer bottom hammock. Some of the very light sil-nylon types will leave your backside with plenty of mosquito bites (especially if not treated...ask me how I know:eek::)

The best part is never crawling into or out of a tent like a Neanderthal. You sit like a superior being and you can lounge in comfort like royalty. Hammocks are truly an "elevated" form of outdoor shelters:D: I would say they are so simple that a caveman could put one up, but there are a lot of cave, err tent-dwellers that just haven't evolved to the hammock yet. Once they do, their outdoors evolution is at its peak:D:

Unless I'm backpacking where temps are consistently below freezing or weather is expected to be more severe; or I'm mostly above the tree-line (or no anchors available at all...like a desert), I would always choose a hammock first.

Hammocks are extremely fast to put up; just as fast to pack up.

Your rain fly allows you to unpack, cook, lounge, do personal hygiene, sleep, and pack up everything first without getting soaked. With the sides sloped down, you'll keep any driving rain out as well.

Hammocks can be put up in much more difficult terrain than tents; wet ground, extremely steep slopes, rocky terrain, very narrow terrain.

Hammocks make our backpacking excursions truly relaxing vacations:thumb:

ROCK6
 

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I've yet to find one that's comfortable, but I'm a side/stomach sleeper. Hard to sleep on your stomach in a hammock, LOL.
Look up bridge hammocks. A little heavier than a regular hammock due to the pole hardware but they lay flat when you get in them. Not exactly for stomach sleepers but a lot of hammock sleepers that use them sleep that way it seems.

Like mentioned hammocks are meant to lie diagonally in. People think of woven flat hammocks on a beach scene as what a hammock is. That is not a traditional hammock at all. Those are uncomfortable, mark the skin and happily dump a person because they are unstable. A proper style hammock hung correctly should be very stable and slightly hug the shoulders keeping you in place and lie mostly flat. Laying down straight in-line with the straps results in a banana lay.

Forgot to mention if you go lightweight, probably sub 1.6oz fabric, get a net or make sure you hang with an under quilt. Like Rock6 mentioned mosquitoes can bite through the ultralight stuff. I always bring my small summer under quilt to solve that as I use 1.2oz fabric to knock the weight down. A double layer hammock or pad/quilt stops the skeeters.

Basic hammocks are cheap, no need to drop $100 at REI for their hammock. Thirty of forty bucks and you are good. They'll usually come with basic suspension. They'll be "heavy" compared to what it out there but it'll work. Same with a tarp. Lots of $35 9' or 10' tarps on Amazon that will get you out in fair weather to see if you like it without breaking the bank.

If hammocks end up being your thing you can look at making/buying things like bishop bags or snake skins to help speed up setup and teardown of the tarp and hammock. With a snakeskin you can get that tarp up in just a minute or three and then have a dry spot to get the hammock and sleeping gear out and in place.
 

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I have always used a tent when I camped, but have been getting more and more interested in the high speed, low drag of hammock camping.
So camping this way should be an adventure. If you have some tips or tricks I welcome them
As long you don't need to deal with man eater tree inhabitant mix with mosquito, and all kind of venomous crawlies as I do, than hammock is better option (lighter) compare to tent.
 
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