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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am new to guns. I have a Mosin Nagant and a Ruger 10/22.

The Mosin Nagant is in pieces. I took it apart to clean it, but I do not really know anything about it. I have a manual that tells how to take it apart but that is it.

I need instructions on how to care for guns. People say you need to oil the gun, but that means absolutely nothing to me. What parts do I oil? How do I clean the barrel? What else do I need to clean? How do I clean it? How often? If it jams, what do I do? Etc. I need to know everything. It seems like every source I can find assumes a great deal of knowledge on the part of the gun owner.

Any good sources of info on the net? How do I get educated pronto? Time is short.
 

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Dear Dar:

the one you have to be concerned with is the Mosin Nagant. The ammo is very corosive. that means after you shoot it the barrel needs to be cleaned really really well. THe same thing applies to the old Brits in 303. the Brits used to pour hot soapy water through the barrel of their guns to stop the corrosive effects of the ammo. When you clean your guns be sure to clean the barrels with something like Gun Scrubber (A cleaner solvent) You should use a bore brush to break loose any of the residue left behind by shooting. clean your chamber like wise. After you have cleaned the gun and wiped it down. Go over it and in the barrel with a light gun oil. You are trying to prevent rusting. It would be best if you had the people who sold you the guns go over the take down and reassembly process as well as review the cleaning with you. I have Nagants myself. Be careful they can become addictive.

By the way the bore brush is in the caliber of the bullet you use. the Nagant is 7.62 or 30 caliber. Your 10 22 Ruger is 22long rifle. Which model Nagant did you buy? 1891, 91-30. 44, 38, Finnish? watch out since some of them are quite valuable. A French made one is very rare. Most models are quite pedestrian. I tend to have most of those. Have fun
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
When you say "go over it" with gun oil that is unclear. That still assumes a lot of knowledge on my part. What parts need oil? How do I oil them. What do you mean by "go over?" ie., how do I apply the oil? Where do I get this oil? Do you see the level of detail I am getting at? I have no experience with this stuff. Do I do this every time I shoot? Even if I am using non-corrosive ammo? Is this level of maintenance necessary on all guns after every time I shoot? (Obviously the soapy water down the barrel is not necessary for non-corrosive ammo) I also need general instructions for all guns, not just the Nagant.

If pouring soapy water down the barrel, do you have to disassemble the gun to do this?

Do you know what all that stuff you get with the Nagant is for? There are some strange metal pieces that came with the gun that look like they do not serve any purpose. I know they are tools or something like that, but I do not know what for.

The Nagant is a 91-30, made in Russia in 1934.

Thanks.
 

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go over your metal parts outside with a cloth with oil in it. In the barrel take a patch which you should find in a guncleaning kit at some place like Walmart, you gun store, Dicks, Academy, etc. You will have a cleaning rod in the cleaning kit. It will be in sections that should screw together. On the tip end you can either put the brush which is like a bristle made of metal in a screw shape. This is for cleaning the barrel of debris and major residue. Next put on a tip that has a hole in it like the eye of a needle. Put one of the cloth patches in it and soak it with the solvent. run solvent through the bore with the clothes until they stop going black. YOu are taking the residue out of your barrel. Repalce the patch and repeat with solvent as needed.When you feelthe inside of the barrel is cleaned out then put another patch on soak it with a light gun oil and runit through the barrel. Wipe down the expose metal parts with the light oil. I will see if I can find a video of how to clean for you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So do you re-use these patches of cloth, or do you need to buy a ton of them?

And yes, they are addicting. I only have one so far, and I want more. It is a nice looking gun, cheap, nostalgic, and ammo is cheap too.
 

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The ammo is very corosive. that means after you shoot it the barrel needs to be cleaned really really well. THe same thing applies to the old Brits in 303.
Most modern production ammunition does not use corrosive primers such as were used when the Mosin Nagant and British .303 were primarily used as battle weapons. You should still clean your rifle after shooting, however, unless you are firing old surplus military ammunition, there is very little chance of the primers being corrosive and therefore resulting in excessive barrel corrosion.

--Wintermute
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
So what type of cleaning generally needs to be conducted on all guns after shooting?

Did soldiers in battle constantly clean their guns after using the corrosive ammo? Or did they just not worry about it?
 

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I'll give you a basic rundown of a standard cleaning pass on a rifle barrel after shooting:

1) when you have the rifle home, open and clear the bolt. Ensure beyond a shadow of a doubt that the rifle is safe and empty of ammunition.

2) Remove the bolt from the rifle and wipe it down (a toothbrush soaked in cleaning solvent is good for cleaning this as well) with a cleaner such as MPro7, Hoppe's, cleanbore, etc... (whatever you end up liking in the end). Wipe off all solvent with a clean dry rag and then use another rag to wipe on some gun oil (I'm going to stay out of the what solvents/oils to use arguments).

3) Wet a bore brush with the cleaning solvent of your choice and run it down the barrel (from the front of the barrel towards the back of the barrel) with a cleaning rod of the appropriate length. Do this 4-5 times.

4) Run a swab/patch down the barrel with cleaning solution on it. You can run a patch down using either a loop or a .30 jag on your cleaning rod.

5) run a clean and dry patch down the barrel in the same way.

6) repeat steps 3 - 5 until the bore of the barrel is clean (patches should stay clean after being run through the barrel).

7) After the barrel has been cleaned to your satisfaction, run a patch with gun oil on it down the barrel in order to lightly coat the barrel with oil and prevent any rust due to condensation while stored.

8) throw out all used patches (don't re-use them). At this point if you like, you can also wipe down external metal portions of the rifle with oil as well.

To be clear, this is a general after shooting clean. This is not how you fully breakdown and clean all parts of the rifle. This is just pretty much what you should do after a session shooting.

Hope that helps you out :)

--Wintermute
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'll give you a basic rundown of a standard cleaning pass on a rifle barrel after shooting:

1) when you have the rifle home, open and clear the bolt. Ensure beyond a shadow of a doubt that the rifle is safe and empty of ammunition.

2) Remove the bolt from the rifle and wipe it down (a toothbrush soaked in cleaning solvent is good for cleaning this as well) with a cleaner such as MPro7, Hoppe's, cleanbore, etc... (whatever you end up liking in the end). Wipe off all solvent with a clean dry rag and then use another rag to wipe on some gun oil (I'm going to stay out of the what solvents/oils to use arguments).

3) Wet a bore brush with the cleaning solvent of your choice and run it down the barrel (from the front of the barrel towards the back of the barrel) with a cleaning rod of the appropriate length. Do this 4-5 times.

4) Run a swab/patch down the barrel with cleaning solution on it. You can run a patch down using either a loop or a .30 jag on your cleaning rod.

5) run a clean and dry patch down the barrel in the same way.

6) repeat steps 3 - 5 until the bore of the barrel is clean (patches should stay clean after being run through the barrel).

7) After the barrel has been cleaned to your satisfaction, run a patch with gun oil on it down the barrel in order to lightly coat the barrel with oil and prevent any rust due to condensation while stored.

8) throw out all used patches (don't re-use them). At this point if you like, you can also wipe down external metal portions of the rifle with oil as well.

To be clear, this is a general after shooting clean. This is not how you fully breakdown and clean all parts of the rifle. This is just pretty much what you should do after a session shooting.

Hope that helps you out :)

--Wintermute
So let's say the SHTF. Is it realistic that you going to be able to go through this whole procedure every time, or every day that you fire your rifle? Do you stock enough cleaning supplies to last indefinitely?
 

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Here is a great how to with pictures on the complete dissassembly and reassembly of a Mosin Nagant rifle. For cleaning, generally, clean all metal after it is dissassembled with a gun cleaning solution. After that dry all parts with a clean dry rag and lightly coat them with oil (by lightly, I mean with a rag that has a little bit of oil on it...not a rag that is dripping wet with oil). Any areas in the gun where metal will move on metal should have a couple of small drops of oil put on them to lubricate for smooth function and reduce metal on metal wearing.

--Wintermute
 

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So let's say the SHTF. Is it realistic that you going to be able to go through this whole procedure every time, or every day that you fire your rifle? Do you stock enough cleaning supplies to last indefinitely?
As stated at the beginning of that...that is a general procedure for cleaning a rifle after shooting at the range. Field breakdown and cleaning procedures are much different and are often times situational.

--Wintermute
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Here is a great how to with pictures on the complete dissassembly and reassembly of a Mosin Nagant rifle. For cleaning, generally, clean all metal after it is dissassembled with a gun cleaning solution. After that dry all parts with a clean try rag and lightly coat them with oil (by lightly, I mean with a rag that has a little bit of oil on it...not a rag that is dripping wet with oil). Any are in the gun where metal will move on metal should have a couple of small drops of oil put on them to lubricate for smooth function and reduce metal on metal wearing.

--Wintermute
What kind of oil? I have heard of gun oil. I assume this is carried at any place they sell guns.
 

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What kind of oil? I have heard of gun oil. I assume this is carried at any place they sell guns.
http://www.brownells.com/aspx/ns/store/catsearch.aspx?c=178&p=4795

There are many hundreds of different gun oils out there...pick a major brand and go with it, or buy a bunch of different brands and find out which ones you like. Some people also use Mobile 1 synthetic motor oil instead of oils manufactured specifically for firearms.

I will leave what you use up to you and make absolutely no recommendations as this is a point where arguments between peoples personal preferences get overly heated :)

--Wintermute
 

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Please, go on. If you don't mind.
Rapid field cleaning can be anything from just wiping dirt out of the action of a rifle (often what is done under fire if a rifle starts jamming) to pulling a bolt and wiping it off and oiling it (usually without any kind of solvent...just a wipe down and oil) and if you have the time, running a bore brush down the rifle a couple of times and possible a patch with some oil on it.

Historically in battle, just wiping dirt out of an action would be something basic done while under fire if a weapon were malfunctioning. At a short rest while marching, possibly just wiping down and oiling the action of the rifle. While having a few hours to rest up in a non-hostile area, breaking down and cleaning the entire rifle and every component was often done. This seems excessive to some people, however, soldiers are trained to break down and clean (othewise known as detail stripping) their rifles over and over again until they can do it without thinking. Also, remember that when your life depends on that weapon, it's your ass if it fails to work because you didn't maintain it properly.

--Wintermute
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Rapid field cleaning can be anything from just wiping dirt out of the action of a rifle (often what is done under fire if a rifle starts jamming) to pulling a bolt and wiping it off and oiling it (usually without any kind of solvent...just a wipe down and oil) and if you have the time, running a bore brush down the rifle a couple of times and possible a patch with some oil on it.

Historically in battle, just wiping dirt out of an action would be something basic done while under fire if a weapon were malfunctioning. At a short rest while marching, possibly just wiping down and oiling the action of the rifle. While having a few hours to rest up in a non-hostile area, breaking down and cleaning the entire rifle and every component was often done. This seems excessive to some people, however, soldiers are trained to break down and clean (othewise known as detail stripping) their rifles over and over again until they can do it without thinking. Also, remember that when your life depends on that weapon, it's your ass if it fails to work because you didn't maintain it properly.

--Wintermute
That is good advice. I should practice taking it apart regularly.
 

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a light grade of motor oil can be used in a pinch, and I've often found myself wiping down my gun parts with everything from red auto rags to paper towels. I've HEARD that auto choke cleaner can be used instead of powder solvent- but as I keep a good supply of Hoppes #9 around, I don't think I'll need to try that one out any time soon.
 

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You have got so much to learn. take it slow. don't get frustrated. much of it is common sense. you should seek out some one that you can learn from in person.

just a few general ideas are:
all outside metal can be cleaned with a soft rag and the light oil. this is mostly to prevent rust. mostly from fingerprints. inside (action) should be treated with a Teflon based lube. so there is not residual oil to attract dirt.

i know there are alot of old time military weapon lovers here. but. those are probably not the best choose for a beginner. modern weapons use noncorrosive primers and need less maint.

there is just way too much detail to type. good luck.
 
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