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Anyone here grow your own tea? I have been considering it and wondered if it was hard. Sun tea is one of my favorite things to make in the summer (even winter if it is a clear enough day). Also if you have a particular strain you like let me know.
 

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I grow a number of plants in my yard that make very tasty teas but if you are speaking of the traditional teas that come from China, you want a very specific kind of "tea" camellia, and it needs a certain climate to thrive. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camellia_sinensis_)

However, raspberry leafs (and other berry leaves), rosemary, mint, lemon verbena (a shrub), lemon grass, chamomile, oregano, basil and sage all make very tasty teas either individually or in combination. Take the fresh leaves of which ever of these plants you have in your garden and put it in hot boiling water. Wait about 5 minutes and you will have a very refreshing tea. The water will not be darkly colored but the flavor will be there. I personally like berry leaf tea, lemon verbena tea, mint tea, and a combination tea of mint, rosemary, and marjoram (or oregano). Go light on the rosemary because it makes a very powerful flavor.
 

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Yep I agree with coached, tea from china does not grow really well in most of our zones but you can make tea out of alot of things.


My favorite is the mint species, they grow VERY well and have several medicinal qualities, when I am congested or have nausea I try to make a nice warm cup of mint tea. One of the best things I have tries is throwing the leaves in a strainer ball and boiling them in my milk and water for hot chocolate, mmmmmmmmmm nothing warms me up like mint hot chocolate :D:

For teas if you are worried about limited or no resources just buy some in bulk now and vacuum pack it with desiccant packs, that should do the trick right?
 

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I grow a number of plants in my yard that make very tasty teas but if you are speaking of the traditional teas that come from China, you want a very specific kind of "tea" camellia, and it needs a certain climate to thrive. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camellia_sinensis_)

However, raspberry leafs (and other berry leaves), rosemary, mint, lemon verbena (a shrub), lemon grass, chamomile, oregano, basil and sage all make very tasty teas either individually or in combination. Take the fresh leaves of which ever of these plants you have in your garden and put it in hot boiling water. Wait about 5 minutes and you will have a very refreshing tea. The water will not be darkly colored but the flavor will be there. I personally like berry leaf tea, lemon verbena tea, mint tea, and a combination tea of mint, rosemary, and marjoram (or oregano). Go light on the rosemary because it makes a very powerful flavor.
I've done the same with some of these - also stinging nettle leaves. Anise also makes a very good tea. I also dry the leaves so I'll have it during the winter when I like to drink hot tea the most. I use a metal tea ball, stuffing it with plenty of leaves to get a full flavor.
 

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Right, I forgot to mention drying the herbs when they are abundant. You can have wonderful teas year round. But most folks don't think of fresh herbs for tea. They really are delicious -- and different -- than dried teas.

I have thought of trying to grow the specific tea-camellia sinensis plant. In general camellia plants grow ok here. And I do love my green tea!
 

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Pine needle tea is Heavy in Vitamin C.

When the SHTF, you can save yourself from scurvy by sipping this commonly looked over tea.
 

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Anyone here grow your own tea? I have been considering it and wondered if it was hard. Sun tea is one of my favorite things to make in the summer (even winter if it is a clear enough day). Also if you have a particular strain you like let me know.
If you are looking for caffeine content, yerba mate is an herbal tea made from a South American holly (Ilex paraguariensis). It is relatively high in caffeine, and is maintenance-free.

Or try Yaupon Holly (Ilex vomitoria). It has an even higher caffeine content, even more than coffee.

I have been looking into natural sources of caffeine, and have settled on growing holly for the purpose.

If you genuinely like the taste of tea itself, I have no input.
 

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Drudge, where can I find out more about youpon holly for tea? Have you ever drank any of the tea? If so, what did it taste like? TP
It tastes almost exactly like yerba mate, which is a commercially available "tea" (herbal infusion) from many of the hippy-dippy looking tea companies. Sort of mildly bitter and herbal. I can't really describe it any more explicitely than that. Try yerba mate if you want to know what it tastes like, because they are essentially the same flavor.

In fact, Yerba can refer to Yaupon holly as well as Paraguayan holly. It simply refers to the dried and finely chopped leaves and stems.

I have yet to find a source for yaupon holly, but i am given to understand that it is common down your way.

Just remember to steep the leaves in hot (but not boiling hot) water. In this way, it differs from the infusion of green tea. Also, let it steep for longer than regular green tea. It will not get extra bitter, as it does not rely on as delicate a flavor as green tea. Drink it warm, but not hot.
 

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I have heard growing what we think of as tea (Chinese black tea) is hard in the US. There is a tea company here near Charleston, South Carolina that I've been told is the only US tea grower. I've heard conditions (sunlight, water, soil) must be just right for tea to survive. I do know and have seen people growing Yaupon Holly here. Maybe I'll give that a try. I have not yet tried pine needle tea but my son loves it. Maybe I should check that out also because one thing South Carolina has plenty of is pine needles. I sure would miss my old Lipton Tea. Maybe it's not a fancy flavored tea like some here are discussing but I love it. So much so that when I first started stocking my year supply of food, the first thing that was completely stocked was Lipton tea.
 

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Lets here it for good old black tea. I do also love my tea but have shifted to green tea (same thing only not fermented/aged.) Did you know tea bags have some medicinal effects -- they are astringent and can be used over your eyes for a cooling effect, and probably on skin irritations. I've heard this but not tried it.
 

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Here in the midwest a lot of communites were settled by German immigrants around the time of the American Civil War. They brought with them chamomile tea to grow in their gardens and it was released into the wild. It is not an uncommon plant to find, scrubby, low lying with small yellow flowers and the distinctive chamomile aroma when you crush a fresh plant between your fingers.
An earlier post mentioned the benefits of peppermint and spearmint which also grows wild in our area. A "relative" of the mint plants is catnip, which can be brewed into a tea to help relieve stomach aches/nausea. We grow catnip in our herb garden primarily for the cats, but I also harvest it for human consumption for tea.
 
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