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Aquaholic
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Discussion Starter #1
Can anyone recommend an efficient way to container garden potatos? Maybe in a trash can or a couple of 5 Gallon buckets?

Can you just drop a potato in dirt and get more potatos from it?
 

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Some people stack old tires and fill them with dirt and hay. When they are ready, you just bust them apart and remove the taters. All you need to make a plant, is to cut a chunk of the tater that has an "eye" and plant it. Some recommend coating them in garden sulfur powder, like sold by Hi Yield brand. This helps keep the eyes from rotting, until they sprout.
 

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growing potatos

When you cut the sprout off the potato, lay out some newspapers on a table and let the cuttings dry for a week before you plant them.

This is a bowl of butter potatoes that were grown in my step sons garden. I supplied the seed and fertilizer and he supplied the land. His garden is a lot closer then my big garden plot, by about 15 miles.
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The potato seed that grew these were planted the weekend before valentines day 2007. A few weeks ago they started sprouting.
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Most people do not know what that "sprout" is on their potatoes.
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Cut the sprout off, with some of the potato, let dry for a week, plant about 3 inches below the surface of the soil. Before planting, make sure the soil has been broken up and any large stones have been removed. When planting, make sure the sprout, ala - the eye is pointed up. The sprout is really the start of the potato plant, and it needs to go upwards.

As the plant grows, hoe up some dirt around the base. If extra soil is not added, the potatoes will grow just under the surface, sometimes breaking through. If the potato is exposed to sunlight, it will turn green and sometimes long exposer to sun light will make the potato unedbile.

Planting potatoes in raised rows will cause problems later on, as the rows will be very tall as the extra dirt is added.
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The first rows in this picture are potatoes. Notice the raised bed, these are too high. Pulling dirt up to the plant just exposed the potatoes growing along the base.

Use a natural slow release fertilizer like manure, or something like 13-13-13 or 10-20-10.
 

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Can this be done with any potatos? Are there any concerns like we have with hybrid plants?

Cheers,
-Per.
 

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Aquaholic
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Discussion Starter #5
If I were to grow them in a conainer....how much depth would they need to grow? Plant them 3 inches deep in a foot or 18 inches of dirt? then add more dirt?
 

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When I was growing up, we just let store bought potatos sprout, then cut them in half and planted them. I bought actual seed potatos a couple years ago. I saved a few from the fall crop in my garage. In the spring, I brought them in the house to warm up, and in a few weeks, I had nice sprouts going, then I cut them and planted them. I figure I can just keep doing this every year.
 

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Can this be done with any potatos? Are there any concerns like we have with hybrid plants?

Cheers,
-Per.
I really do not know. If the potato starts to sprout, cut off the eye and plant it and see what happens.



If I were to grow them in a conainer....how much depth would they need to grow? Plant them 3 inches deep in a foot or 18 inches of dirt? then add more dirt?
Its not only depth, its width. That is why Txkstew recommended tires. Instead of hoeing up dirt around the potato, you just add another tire and pour dirt in on top of the plant - serving the same purpose. Plus the tires are wide.
 

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Originally Posted by Per Ardua
Can this be done with any potatos? Are there any concerns like we have with hybrid plants?
All potatoes are exactly the same as the mother plant. The only way to get a different type is to plant the tiny potato seeds that come from the flowers. It is a two year process that way as the seed only grows a very small tuber the first year. Now if you replant that, the second year you will have useable potatoes (maybe). It is best to plant different potato types for cross pollination if you want seeds. Quality of the potatoes will be a genetic luck of the draw but that is how new strains are developed and you might get lucky…maybe the “Through Struggle” potato?
 

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I went to a wedding years ago. We were at the brides father's house and out side was a small free standing platform, with a roof over it. Inside, was a bunch of potatoes, covered with lime. He said it was how he stored them for the next year.
 

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I planted some sweet potatoes this summer, in the drought. They did great, but they were bland tasting. A bland sweet potato? Any one know why?
 

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I planted some sweet potatoes this summer, in the drought. They did great, but they were bland tasting. A bland sweet potato? Any one know why?
Maybe the drought had something to do with it? Boil them potatoes with the craw fish, bet they wont be bland then. Man, I need to have a craw fish boil.

:)
 

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Should times be tough or potatoes scares, you can set many sprouts from a single potato buy suspending in a container so it’s end is in water (tooth picks work). It will send out roots and many, many sprouts. When the sprouts reach 2 to 4 inches, cut them off and set them about half way in water to root. When the sprout is rooted, handle it like a tomato transplant. Mean while the mother potato will continues to send up sprouts unless you damage the eyes.

Although you can get many more sprouts this way than planting small potatoes or larger potato pieces, they do not have the reserve food supply the potato pieces supplies so you need to be more careful in planting and watering. I have done it and know that it works and would not go through the extra work unless my seed potato supply was very low. Keep it in mind though; survival is all about options.
 

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What is the best way to keep your seed stock potatoes, from one year to the next? Seems to me they would dry up, or rot before the next season. I've heard of keeping them in lime, as I posted earlier, and I've heard of keeping them in net bags hung from a wall. Any other methods of keeping your seed potatoes?
 

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Storing seed potatoes, until you are ready to plant them, in a cool (40-45 F) and dark place at relative humidity of 90 to 95%. A sand or dirt root cellar is the best place and placing them in a heap on the ground works better than bags (IMO). Some people do cure potato’s for 10 to 14 days after harvest at 50 to 60 F and relative humidity at about 95% to heal cuts and bruises before storage but we just sort out damaged ones for immediate use.
After curing, potatoes for seed or table stock are held at 38 to 40F which is considered optimum for most cultivars for maximum storage life because sprout growth is absent or negligible, decay and shrinkage are low, and other losses are usually minimized. At temperatures below 38 F, potatoes are chilled and tend to become too sweet for most uses. Storage at 32 to 34F for 20 weeks or longer causes some cultivars to show symptoms of chilling injury. Potatoes are easily damaged by freezing at temperatures as high as 30 F. Most potatoes will remain dormant during 5 to 8 months of storage at 39 F to 42 F with 95% relative humidity.

In the spring, seed potato stocks are often warmed to 50F or warmer for several days to stimulate healing after cutting and rapid sprouting after planting.
 

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the sulfur powder you mentioned is this?

Some people stack old tires and fill them with dirt and hay. When they are ready, you just bust them apart and remove the taters. All you need to make a plant, is to cut a chunk of the tater that has an "eye" and plant it. Some recommend coating them in garden sulfur powder, like sold by Hi Yield brand. This helps keep the eyes from rotting, until they sprout.
sulfur powder, sulfur granules
 

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traveler
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What is the best way to keep your seed stock potatoes, from one year to the next? Seems to me they would dry up, or rot before the next season. I've heard of keeping them in lime, as I posted earlier, and I've heard of keeping them in net bags hung from a wall. Any other methods of keeping your seed potatoes?
My grandparents (who I learned most of what I know about the "old days") used to keep them in the root cellar, covered in a foot or so of straw, with a good bit of dirt piled on top of the straw. They would last a long time that way.
 

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Prep and be calm
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I heard that during the Irish Potato Famine (so named because potatoes was about all they had) the potatoes were grown in just a box of straw. I've not seen that done tho. But they don't need a lot of soil -- mostly just steady moist mulch or anything that will cover them from the light.

When you grow potatoes you will have some that are quite small. The size of seed potatoes. As you harvest them save these little ones by either putting them over winter in a root cellar or in the back of your fridge. They will sprout from the "eyes" of the potato. You can then plant them. I plant each little potato whole (no need to cut and dry). It is easier and you don't risk loosing the potato cuttings from rot (which does happen).

Using potatoes from the store for seed is a bit risky because -- I've heard -- they treat the potatoes to reduce them sprouting -- so they are not as likely to sprout and grow if you plant them. If you buy organic potatoes at a farmers market you'd probably be fine using those. They will always stay true to the variety they are. No hybrids that I've heard of any way.
 

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Follow your own star
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Can anyone recommend an efficient way to container garden potatos? Maybe in a trash can or a couple of 5 Gallon buckets?

Can you just drop a potato in dirt and get more potatos from it?
I acually have potatoes growing from skins and old yucky potatoes that I just threw in a empty spot on the side of the house.
 
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