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Proverbs 26:4
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I've read a couple threads about this also and I have to say it was quite a relief to learn that I could use turbo shock or similar for purifying water. Especially since liquid bleach has such short shelf life.

Thanks for the reminder
 

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Proverbs 22:3
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Discussion Starter #5
I was writing down the instructions for this, the video says 1 part bleach to 100 parts water for clear water. There are 768 teaspoons in a gallon, I assumed it would be about 8 teaspoons bleach for each gallon of water. the EPA website says 1/8 teaspoon to 1 gallon of clear water.
Input??
 

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Looks like rain to me.
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Is there a difference in the strength of the bleach you buy in the bottle and the bleach you mix up from pool bleach??

That would be my only thought.
 

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Proverbs 22:3
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Discussion Starter #7
I thought so too, but the instructions said it makes bleach the same strength as off the shelf. Ill have to make some up and have a science teacher friend test it, then use it on pond water and have her test that, too.
 

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As I understand, your main concern is to insure that it's just calcium hypochlorite, that it doesn't have any other algaecidal additives.
 

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Proverbs 26:4
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I thought so too, but the instructions said it makes bleach the same strength as off the shelf. Ill have to make some up and have a science teacher friend test it, then use it on pond water and have her test that, too.
That would be FANTASTIC if you could do that!
 

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I was writing down the instructions for this, the video says 1 part bleach to 100 parts water for clear water. There are 768 teaspoons in a gallon, I assumed it would be about 8 teaspoons bleach for each gallon of water. the EPA website says 1/8 teaspoon to 1 gallon of clear water.
Input??
This has been hashed and rehashed on these forums and it does get a little confusing. The stock chlorine solution that you get by mixing about a teaspoon of CHC with 2 gallons of water is NOT the same strength as regular bleach. It comes to about 500 ppm as compared with about 60,000 ppm for off the shelf bleach.

First go to this website:
http://www.epa.gov/safewater/faq/emerg.html

Quote from EPA:
You can use granular calcium hypochlorite to disinfect water.
Add and dissolve one heaping teaspoon of high-test granular calcium hypochlorite (approximately ¼ ounce) for each two gallons of water, or 5 milliliters (approximately 7 grams) per 7.5 liters of water. The mixture will produce a stock chlorine solution of approximately 500 milligrams per liter, since the calcium hypochlorite has available chlorine equal to 70 percent of its weight. To disinfect water, add the chlorine solution in the ratio of one part of chlorine solution to each 100 parts of water to be treated. This is roughly equal to adding 1 pint (16 ounces) of stock chlorine to each 12.5 gallons of water or (approximately ½ liter to 50 liters of water) to be disinfected. To remove any objectionable chlorine odor, aerate the disinfected water by pouring it back and forth from one clean container to another.


To mix at the prescribed one part to 100 you would use about 2 1/2 tablespoons of this stock solution per gallon of water. This is about 1.25 ounces per 128 oz or 1:100. In contrast you'd only use about 8 drops of liquid off the shelf bleach to do the same job.

Now go here:
http://www.maine.gov/dhhs/eng/water/Templates/Sections/Field%20Services/disinfectionequations.htm

This site gives you formulas whereby you can calculate how much granular CHC or liquid bleach you need to produce whatever strength solution you want. If you're handy with numbers you can prove to yourself just what you need to disinfect your water.

Some of you might be thinking: Why mess with the CHC when you can use so little bleach to do the job? That's a reasonable thought but as others have already posted liquid bleach just doesn't keep it's strength over time and everybody's preps ought to include at least one 5 lb container of granulated calcium hypochlorite. That's enough to disinfect about 80,000 gallons of water at 5 ppm. It does come in different strengths and YMMV but the common strengths are 65% - 70% and the above prescription will be close enough to do the job when using common CHC.

gk
 

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Cautious
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This item from Hach is an easy way to determine if you have used enough bleach in your drinking water. Just pour a little water (10ml) into a clear container from your treated water & add the contents of one of the packets into it. No color means not enough bleach, light to medium pink is just right & dark red means too much bleach. You should wait at least 30 min after treating before testing & if the water is very cold you should wait several hours.
 

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Proverbs 22:3
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Discussion Starter #12
This has been hashed and rehashed on these forums and it does get a little confusing. The stock chlorine solution that you get by mixing about a teaspoon of CHC with 2 gallons of water is NOT the same strength as regular bleach. It comes to about 500 ppm as compared with about 60,000 ppm for off the shelf bleach.

First go to this website:
http://www.epa.gov/safewater/faq/emerg.html

Quote from EPA:
You can use granular calcium hypochlorite to disinfect water.
Add and dissolve one heaping teaspoon of high-test granular calcium hypochlorite (approximately ¼ ounce) for each two gallons of water, or 5 milliliters (approximately 7 grams) per 7.5 liters of water. The mixture will produce a stock chlorine solution of approximately 500 milligrams per liter, since the calcium hypochlorite has available chlorine equal to 70 percent of its weight. To disinfect water, add the chlorine solution in the ratio of one part of chlorine solution to each 100 parts of water to be treated. This is roughly equal to adding 1 pint (16 ounces) of stock chlorine to each 12.5 gallons of water or (approximately ½ liter to 50 liters of water) to be disinfected. To remove any objectionable chlorine odor, aerate the disinfected water by pouring it back and forth from one clean container to another.


To mix at the prescribed one part to 100 you would use about 2 1/2 tablespoons of this stock solution per gallon of water. This is about 1.25 ounces per 128 oz or 1:100. In contrast you'd only use about 8 drops of liquid off the shelf bleach to do the same job.

Now go here:
http://www.maine.gov/dhhs/eng/water/Templates/Sections/Field%20Services/disinfectionequations.htm

This site gives you formulas whereby you can calculate how much granular CHC or liquid bleach you need to produce whatever strength solution you want. If you're handy with numbers you can prove to yourself just what you need to disinfect your water.

Some of you might be thinking: Why mess with the CHC when you can use so little bleach to do the job? That's a reasonable thought but as others have already posted liquid bleach just doesn't keep it's strength over time and everybody's preps ought to include at least one 5 lb container of granulated calcium hypochlorite. That's enough to disinfect about 80,000 gallons of water at 5 ppm. It does come in different strengths and YMMV but the common strengths are 65% - 70% and the above prescription will be close enough to do the job when using common CHC.

gk
Thanks for the input!! That is why I love this board.
 

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This item from Hach is an easy way to determine if you have used enough bleach in your drinking water. Just pour a little water (10ml) into a clear container from your treated water & add the contents of one of the packets into it. No color means not enough bleach, light to medium pink is just right & dark red means too much bleach. You should wait at least 30 min after treating before testing & if the water is very cold you should wait several hours.
You bet.
Although nowadays they have more sophisticated tools to determine free chlorine residual these are the exact items from Hach I used when running our community's water filter plant. The full test kit comes with a color comparison unit to determine just how much free chlorine is in your water but you don't need it. All you need is a vial marked at 10 ml and one packet of the reagent. Add one packet to the 10 ml and shake a little then hold it up against a light (white) background and if there is any pink at all you have enough for proper disinfection. More doesn't gain you anything. Actually the least amount of color is preferred. That way you'll know you've gotten proper disifection with the least amount of chlorine.
For initial disinfection, after filtering and before color testing, Arkwater is correct. You need to let your chlorine work in the water for about 30 minutes. If the water is very cold, yes, you need to let the chlorine work longer. I think several hours may be overkill but at least an hour for very cold water. Then you can test for the residual.

gk
 
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