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Vigilant
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Salt is vital to a survivalists life and way of life. It's used for so many things. Food preparation, preservation and medicine to name a few. If your planning on buggin' out maybe for the long haul, where do we procure large quantities of salt in the wild? Answers may vary by region so i'll be interested to hear what y'all got to say. Where's the salt? :confused:
 

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Banned
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9,787 Posts
well there are several methods to make salt tha tI can think of.

the first would be mixing sodium and chlorine and letting it crystalize.

the other would be neutralizing the right acid to get something you can use. when you neutralize acid you get salt and water as a result.

I'm not sure if it is the kind of salt you want to eat though.
 

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Wild Edibles Expert
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10,167 Posts
There are several plants that either "sweat" salt or can be burned for their salt, and they don't all live near the ocean. There are many salty places inland where salt tolerant plants grow and store or collect salt. The more difficult spice to come by is pepper, and again there are several plants that are a good pepper substitute.
 

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Survivor
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9 Posts
A matter of life or death

Salt is necessary to ALL life on earth no salt you die. The history of salt is really interesting. I can even argue that all UFO landings are at salt locations-in other words they need it too.

Where do you find salt? The answer is under your feet. How do you find salt? Follow the animals. The Native Americans and aboriginals on all continents followed animals to what are known as Salt Licks. This is where the salt is very near the surface. The animal will either root for it, or eat the dirt that has high salt content.

In the Western part of the United States there are many dry lakes which are now Salt Flats where the water has evaporated and left the salt on the surface. Groom lake in Area 51, and Edwards Air Force Base, where the space shuttle lands are two Examples. Most Military bases are built at salt sites. Luke AFB in Arizona was built right next door to a salt mine. When the Base goes on Alert for any reason, the salt mine is closed.

I desparate times, you could gather dirt from roadsides that have been salted for the ice. If you pour water through the dirt and filter it through a cloth, then let the water evaporate (in a can or jar or even a wheel barrel with a piece of glass over it) the salt and some other minerals will be left.

The best thing you can do is prepare. Get some salt. Get a lot of salt. Get some tiny little bags to put it in. Use it to Barter.

If you think I am kidding visit saltinstitute.org and look at some of the 14,000 uses for salt that exist today. Today we get most of our salt in processed food.

What did not exist, in the past, was easy access to salt. That is why Roman Soldiers were paid wages in salt. They could convert this to whatever currency they would need wherever they were posted. The city of Rome was moved 3 different times when the Sea level rose and wiped out the salt flats. "Via Salerium" translates to "Salt Road"

Sea salt is aquired by evaporating sea water through boiling. Lewis and Clark sent 8 guys to the ocean for an entire winter to evaporate seawater. They managed to make only a few bushels for their efforts.

In England, Salt Springs and salt works were created to produce salt through evaporation. In this method water is forced into the ground to bring up Brine (salty water) which is then evaporated in Pans through boiling. England was practically deforested because of all the wood burned to create salt. The word Wich is old English for "Salt Town" Ipswich-Sandwich and Greenwich (where time begins )were all salt towns.

If you are going to store salt, store the Iodized kind. Iodine has been proven to prevent goiter and thyroid problems. Goiter is very rare today.

The last known person to be shot for Salt smuggling was in Israel in 1938. Then a British colony, and still called Palestine, A salt smuggler was shot by the British Police-Yeah folks Salt is that important.
 

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To the surface!
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8,012 Posts
Like other groceries, when I see it on sale I buy an extra pound or two. It's cheap, it keeps and I don't use much on my food so I have some for whatever purposes (canning, other food preserving, etc.) may come up if I can't get any.

If/when I get some rural property I may remember to get some salt licks to put out for wildlife.
 

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Salt is vital to a survivalists life and way of life. It's used for so many things. Food preparation, preservation and medicine to name a few. If your planning on buggin' out maybe for the long haul, where do we procure large quantities of salt in the wild? Answers may vary by region so i'll be interested to hear what y'all got to say. Where's the salt? :confused:
Alas Babylon by chance?
 

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It's actually a great book if you like nukes. I'll admit it's a bit dated and optimistic (like the day after) but still a great read. The story is good, the characters are interesting and nukes go off. How much better can you get :D:
 
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