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Golfer
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The pro sharpening job sucked, was twice as dull as when I brought it in. So I put it back on the stone to sharpen it up. I did get it sharper but the stone scratched the blade up. What's happening?
 

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I have an electric sharpener with is a water wheel. I use it to get the angle correct then go to a Lansky tool. I use the Lansky for touch ups. There are lots of "keys" to a good edge. I think keeping the angle correct on both sides if most important. I have found that my knives that live in the sheath and never get out remain sharp.
 

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What grade of stone were you using? I always finish up with a 2000 grit stone. Knife looks like it has a chrome finish.
 

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Educated guess is your at the wrong angle and your likely wobbling the angle as you work! Use some blue masking tape just back from the edge until you get better so you don’t scratch the blade. If you can’t tell where your stone is working use a marker on the edge to show where the stone is wearing!

SD
 

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After 10 years of owning a Smith's sharpening set I finally saw a YouTube video that showed how to use it and what I was doing wrong. The Smith's set up with the rods and different grade stones is the cat's meow.
 

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Are you sure someone wasn't holding a beer in one hand while sharpening? 😁

It's hard to tell, but that edge angle looks like it may be a pretty steep angle. Go through a couple of ytube videos before you mess with an expensive knife.

Do not use much pressure. Everyone has their favorite way, but no one uses much force.
 
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Golfer
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It's hard to tell, but that edge angle looks like it may be a pretty steep angle. Go through a couple of ytube videos before you mess with an expensive knife.
That's what I was thinking, he sharpened the edge at a steep angle and when I followed up with a more flatter angle the stone scraped on the side, causing the scratches.
If that is what happened, how can I get back to a less steep angle? Otherwise it will never sharpen!
 

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As Sundsvall suggested, get yourself a magic marker and run it along the edge, then sharpen. As far as angle goes; that depends on what you will be using it for and the nature of the steel.

Lots of enthusiasts will try to get it really shallow. Others, who use them for the great outdoors, not so much.

As a rule of thumb, I try to lay my blade flat on a stone and then raise the spine no more than ~3 quarters (coins) width for pocket knives.

Seriously, try the marker idea. Watch a ytube...

eta, sorry, if you think you need to change the profile there is no shortcut. Rough stone first.... Take your time.
 

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Golfer
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
That knife is a Misono 440 which had an edge with an 70/30 angle. I don't think I can bring that back, wondering what is the best approach now.
 

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What did you pay to have it sharpened?
Now think about how much of a dent that would make in the cost of a decent sharpener, and then buy one, and learn to use it.

I use large water stones and smaller whet stones with oil or water or spit, if that's all I have. Might have $50 in them, over the last 40 years. Always wanted to try one of the nifty belt sharpeners, but never needed to...so I haven't. I've used a few of the little rotary stone units...evil things, too easy to ruin a knife; but good for taking a completely dull non-edged knife you buy in a second hand store and starting to repair it.

I cannot imagine taking MY knives to a professional to sharpen it. Never EVER crossed my mind, and ESPECIALLY not a pocket knife. Too easy to sharpen it myself.

But I can understand a restaurant or other industrial user of knives doing it. They pay cooks and butchers to cook and cut, not to sharpen tools.

I worked in kitchens, but I sharpened my own tools on my own time, and they entered and left the kitchen with me. Never bothered messing with the stuff hanging in the racks, because if I did grab one in a hurry, it was never as sharp as I wanted.
 

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KOAD; FOAD; ESAD
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Late 50's,early 60's we had an old guy come thru town maybe 1-2 times a year...had a circuit he followed...slept in his car,stayed a few days..had a "Knives and Scissors Sharpened" sign he stuck out..everybody took their kitchen knives and sewing shears to him and for 50 cents each he locked them in a little machine he had and turned a crank..the item traveled on a worm gear and a tool steel wheel cut a perfect edge.. Ive never seen another like it but Id love to have one..
 

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Do Not learn to sharpen a good knife on anything motorized! It's one sure way to ruin an edge if you're not sure of yourself.

I'm sure you can reprofile yours with some patience, but it will take all of that. Your steel isn't one of the super strong alloys, so don't spend a lot on diamond or ceramic unless you are going to do it often. Not sure what you paid to get it done but unless you are shaving with this blade don't do it again.

You can learn, it's not that hard. If nothing else, use this blade for practice. When I learned there were no online videos and I learned to sharpen my str8 razors from an old barber.

If you're having problems, let us know. Remember, there are a number of ways to get where you are trying to go. Some of us are just stubborn old farts set in OUR way.
 

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I just saw that yours is a kitchen knife, and not a 'cheap ' one at that. Why is the blade blackened, or am I seeing things? I would definitely recommend you get that angle down to maybe 10 to 15deg per side. As I said before, patience. Honing with a steel should be done before (or after) each use.

It looks like the scratch pattern is pretty coarse. Do you know what grit or how rough your stones are? You need at least 1,000 to 6,000 grit as a finish. The edge should come out pretty shiny.
 
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Golfer
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I got it done at Circle Saw, cost $5.50. when I got it back I used a 1000 grit stone to try to get the edge back. It's sharper now but I think the shape - one side being flat - is preventing a good edge. And might contribute to those scratches too.
 

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Puttster, you're saying this is a single bevel knife that now has a 2 sided bevel? The side in your pic isn't supposed to have a bevel? If so, that's messed up.

Stop trying to sharpen that side. Only sharpen the right side (other). You should probably develope a 'bead' On the edge. Then draw it 1 or 2 times along the left side, very shallow, as if to slice a tomato. That should remove the bead and leave a sharp knife.

You probably have made a bit of a boo-boo. It isn't a single bevel knife anymore, but you can get it sharp.

It will take a while. Use a rough stone. Work your way, patiently, to that 1k grit. Remember that shallow angle. Don't sharpen the left side anymore. Only use a single slice (or 2) on the left side to remove the bead.

JMHO
 
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Golfer
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Probably now both sides are the same angle but on the side that used to be flatter, the bevel is shorter. So you would say leave that side alone and in the future just sharpen the other side. Hold it at a flatter angle?
 

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Your knife is a right handed knife (there are also lefties). When slicing you can theoretically achieve a more accurate and finer slice.

Now that you have put a bevel on the other sides, you can keep sharpening both sides or you can just sharpen the right side (remembering to remove the bead) and eventually get it back to it's original self.

Irregardless, often the lack of sharpness is because the bead is still there. That is something you are best off watching a video about.

Remember:
Patience with a fine stone.
Keep your angle.
Little pressure.
Remove the bead at the end.

Honing is something you do all the time. Sharpening, not so much unless you are cutting on marble or a plate...

eta, Also look up the part about running a magic marker along the edge (let it dry). then running it across the stone. Look to see what is left of the marker. You'll get a pretty good idea how close you are to the current angle.
 
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