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Ham Extra Class
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I posted earlier my diesel fuel tank, now here is my gas tank installed, About 2 months ago.
Gas is a little more trickier than diesel to store.
First off I treated the fuel with stabilizer. And I use Super Unleaded, because it stays fresher longer IMHO. This tank is an old fuel oil tank I found for free that was in great shape, I just hot presure washed it and let dry a few days.
I installed a fill cap that is like a radiator cap and it holds pressure in the tank until 3 pounds plus or minus presure. This helps to keep the fuel fresher and keeps condensation down.
I also installed a ground strap for static electricity.
I placed the tank under a shed to help keep the summer sun from heating up the gas.
The tank can hold up to 275 gallons of gas, however I will put gas in it as my funds will allow.
I placed the tank way away from the house for safety also, it is beside an out building. Also motion sensors are around the tank to detect thieves.


A picture below of the tank, pump, gallon meter, and fuel water separator filter



Its an optical illusion the tank is leaning in this photo below, it is level.



A picture below of a presurised fuel fill cap like on a radiator.



A picture below of the ground strap, for static electrcity, the ground rod is about 3 feet in the ground.
 

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You should find a way to keep it cooler. The roof over it will help a ton but it will still get too warm for any real long term storage. Letting gas get to 80 degrees is boiling it. I have seen many above ground tanks though on farms and such. It will work but keeping gas cool is key to extending its life. I have always found that my boats which sit with gas in them through the winter never need Stabil but my winter things like snow blowers get all gunked up because they sit and boil the gas all summer. BUT HEY , YOU ARE OFF TO GREAT START. Very cool set up.

Kingfish
 

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looks good. have you contacted a gas distributor to find out how much it would be to fill it? you might get a small discount for a small bulk purchase.
 

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Just a tad bit insane
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Tip buy gas in winter. Got more butane in it if I rember correctly. Helps vehicles start better. Smart idea, might look for one when I get my own when I get my own place. zonning laws are a royal pain in the ass.

and kingfish gas stores better in large quantities. Might be a reason. Just a thought.
 

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B-12 (in quantity) will help w/ h2o in the fuel. Get it from any advance or autozone. (you probably already knew that). I wish I cold find a tank. Nice!!!:thumb:
 

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Ham Extra Class
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I should of stated in the first post that I plan on rotating out this gas every few months in my wifes car and in the other gas powered things we have.
I will try to keep at least 100 gallons around, and then fill it back up with fresh gas.
If I had a way to keep the gas cooler I would, however I don't want to A/C the outbuilding, And if I did the gas tank would then want a big screen TV and a fridge with beer in it.:D:
 

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Tip buy gas in winter. Got more butane in it if I rember correctly. Helps vehicles start better. Smart idea, might look for one when I get my own when I get my own place. zonning laws are a royal pain in the ass.

and kingfish gas stores better in large quantities. Might be a reason. Just a thought.
Yup and they store it under ground.

http://www.challengers101.com/FuelStorage.html

80 degress is the tipping point where it really starts to break down. It must be stabilized if its going to get that warm. That is why Gas stations all have underground tanks which keep it at a stable cool temp. AROUND 58 DEGREES.

My suggestion is he just wrap the tank with some type of insulation or bury it to keep it as cool as possible. He already has put it under a roof but it depends on where he lives. If hes in Florida and its 95 every day in the shade that gas is boiling. If he is in Alaska it probably wont get over 70 degrees and would last much longer . I am pumping out an underground fuel oil tank right now. The oil is like 20 years old and it still looks pretty good. I am not going to however fill it with gas. Our township ordered us to dig it up and remove it because some Idiot put it too close to our well. Our fuel oil furnace is no longer there as we heat with wood.

So the cooler he keeps his tank? the longer it will last and remain usable. just sayin, Kingfish
 

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Ham Extra Class
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yup and they store it under ground.

http://www.challengers101.com/FuelStorage.html

80 degress is the tipping point where it really starts to break down. It must be stabilized if its going to get that warm. That is why Gas stations all have underground tanks which keep it at a stable cool temp. AROUND 58 DEGREES.

My suggestion is he just wrap the tank with some type of insulation or bury it to keep it as cool as possible. He already has put it under a roof but it depends on where he lives. If hes in Florida and its 95 every day in the shade that gas is boiling. If he is in Alaska it probably wont get over 70 degrees and would last much longer . I am pumping out an underground fuel oil tank right now. The oil is like 20 years old and it still looks pretty good. I am not going to however fill it with gas. Our township ordered us to dig it up and remove it because some Idiot put it too close to our well. Our fuel oil furnace is no longer there as we heat with wood.

So the cooler he keeps his tank? the longer it will last and remain usable. just sayin, Kingfish
I could never bury the tank and be able to afford it.
I would have to have a permit, special tank, and installed by a licensed company, and if I got caught doing it myself the fine is like a Bizzillon dollars.:(
 

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Evaporation

The gasoline light ends needed for easy starting have the same tendency to vaporize in storage as they do in an engine. If the storage container is not tightly sealed, some of the light ends gradually will be lost. Too great a loss decreases the gasoline's ability to start an engine.

Evaporation of gasoline from a vented fuel tank or a can with a loose cap would be minimal if the temperature of the container were constant. But daily temperature changes cause the temperature of the container to cycle. The heating portion of the cycle raises the pressure of the gas (gasoline vapor and air) above the liquid gasoline which, in turn, drives some of the vapor-air mixture out of the container. The succeeding cooling cycle lowers the pressure of the gas, drawing fresh air into the container. Light ends evaporate from the liquid gasoline to saturate the new air. The daily repetition of this cycle gradually pumps light ends out of the container.

The cycle also brings air and water vapor into the container, especially during periods of high humidity. The oxygen in the air contributes to gum formation. (See Oxidation section.) And the water vapor, if it condenses during the cooling cycle, contaminates the gasoline with liquid water.

A larger volume of gas will be pumped in and out of the container when the air space above the liquid fuel is larger and when the daily temperature change is larger. Consequently, keeping the container almost full of gasoline and controlling the temperature fluctuations will minimize the loss of light ends, the exposure of the gasoline to air, and the contamination of the gasoline with water.



This explains why gasoline should be stored under ground due to keeping a constant temp. Also there is a uniform code that states we can only use up to a 60 gallon drum for storage. He might be in violation of his local code. All the more reason to bury it. just sayin, Kingfish
 

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Build an insulated dog house around it. 6 inch glass insulation in the walls and roof. Im not trying to shoot your plan down just trying to save you some major headaches. I have tried storing gas long term and failed . This gas today is really crappy stuff and does not take kindly to being heated up and cooled down every day. I keep 60 gallons and cycle it out every 3 months. I know your pain about the permit stuff. They already got me. I was supposed to pull mine two years ago. Now I have until Tuesday to get it out of the hole. Mine is not even being used. Kingfish
 

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I just had another Idea that would be cheap and it would work. Build a plywood box around it and fill it with blown in insulation . cellulose. then paint it white. It would be just like burying it right where it sits. KF
 

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Yup and they store it under ground.

http://www.challengers101.com/FuelStorage.html

80 degress is the tipping point where it really starts to break down. It must be stabilized if its going to get that warm. That is why Gas stations all have underground tanks which keep it at a stable cool temp. AROUND 58 DEGREES.

My suggestion is he just wrap the tank with some type of insulation or bury it to keep it as cool as possible. He already has put it under a roof but it depends on where he lives. If hes in Florida and its 95 every day in the shade that gas is boiling. If he is in Alaska it probably wont get over 70 degrees and would last much longer . I am pumping out an underground fuel oil tank right now. The oil is like 20 years old and it still looks pretty good. I am not going to however fill it with gas. Our township ordered us to dig it up and remove it because some Idiot put it too close to our well. Our fuel oil furnace is no longer there as we heat with wood.

So the cooler he keeps his tank? the longer it will last and remain usable. just sayin, Kingfish
defiantly, though temp thing I didn't know about. I was always told sweating was the risk not boiling. but 95 degree gas tank? bad idea to begin with. burying is the best option. in fact I hear its preferred. Zoning laws... how one hates them. I was adding to the fact that if it is used for long term might want to start with more butane.
 

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Paint it a bright white and then wrap it with insulation...

We had one at one of our factories just like that for company cars & trucks. It was out in the open in sunlight all the time.

Granted it was filled at least two times a year but never had any problems with it. I always wanted to build a shed around it but the owner did not think it was needed...
 

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I live in the PNW which stays pretty cool (even now). I have 10 55 gal drums sealed and filled with contingency gas which I stabilize and use up each year and re-fill.

The drums are sitting on rubber horse stall matting in an enclosed "lean-to" off my shop. Any recommendations on I should worry about grounding, ventilation, etc? I don't pour gas in the room, and if I pump from either the 55gal drums, or the 5 gal jerry cans, I take it outside.

There's no way I could burry a tank(s). The water table is at about 30 ft, and the county is ultra environmentally sensitive about permits. They even have a "secret squad" of observers who drive the county roads reporting folks adding decks, or tilling up gardens in the wetland buffers, or in suspected Mazama Pocket Golpher habitations.

When I use the gas, I immediately re-fill the containers to make sure the supply is always on hand.

Mike-
 

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Looks good! Jealous. Just one thing I would be concerned with:

Your static ground wire looks of concern... Is the paint sanded/scratched off where the wire meets the tank? Also, typically use to seeing a heavier gauge wire used such as 1 gauge braided non-insulated. Would also recommend using a lock washer to 'secure' the contact point on the tank to help prevent loose connection over time. Static prevention is not something I would mess with when it comes to gas. The org I work for typically has over-stringent rules -so what I am use to seeing may be over the top, but I would definitely make sure I got the best possible ground!
 

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I live in the PNW which stays pretty cool (even now). I have 10 55 gal drums sealed and filled with contingency gas which I stabilize and use up each year and re-fill.

The drums are sitting on rubber horse stall matting in an enclosed "lean-to" off my shop. Any recommendations on I should worry about grounding, ventilation, etc? I don't pour gas in the room, and if I pump from either the 55gal drums, or the 5 gal jerry cans, I take it outside.

There's no way I could burry a tank(s). The water table is at about 30 ft, and the county is ultra environmentally sensitive about permits. They even have a "secret squad" of observers who drive the county roads reporting folks adding decks, or tilling up gardens in the wetland buffers, or in suspected Mazama Pocket Golpher habitations.

When I use the gas, I immediately re-fill the containers to make sure the supply is always on hand.

Mike-
I would think a static (ground) line would be a good thing to have...but do not tie it to any electrical ground that you have in your lean-to; should have its own ground rod. You could tie all the tanks together to one rod though. And since you have drums for portability, I would not screw wires to the drums - get some clamps so you can easily disconnect.
 
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