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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I read a article on gorila gardening growing wild plants around that most people don't know are edible

What can I grow when I have pine trees eveywhere?
 

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Don't listen to him.

Here's what you do ...

Check first that you have full sun on a patch of ground at least 8-10 hours a day in Spring, Summer and early Fall.

Build raised beds in that area. Use landscape timbers (X4 timbers high) or 2" X 10" 's or 2" X 12" 's (untreated; the exterior treated timbers will leach toxins into the soil and the plants that you eat), place on edge in 4' X 8' or 5' X 10' rectangles. Screw together. (Check elsewhere in the gardening section here to see examples of this.) beds of this dimension allow you to pack a lot in a small area but it is easy to reach across for most people. You can also build squares four or five feet square if the other sizes are too big.

Place weed blocking landscape fabric on the entire bottom of the bed. This prevents weeds and grass sprouting up.

Fill those beds with a good mix natural ingredients to compensate for all of the acidic soil that your pine trees love but veggies don't.

Peat moss, top soil (from nursery - not potting soil - too expensive), compost (many municipalities give to away by the truck load) and manure. My favorite retail product is "Black Cow", but check Craigslist in your area. People often give away horse and cow manure from their barns, so you can save money that way.

Plant and watch things grow.

After the plants are a few inches high, place mulch around them to reduce weeds. I use cedar mulch because the natural cedar oils repel bugs which can eat your plants. Cedar (which is shredded rather than in cubes like pine bark mulch) won't float away in a heavy rain storm.

Check elsewhere i this gardening section for much advice on growing food crops.

Good luck to you! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks

I knew I was spelling it wrong.

Kept typing it in on my phone different ways to find different spellings Sure type only helps some times
 

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Google makes for a great spell check. lol

What's growing under those trees now?
Any ground cover at all?
Oh and what's the climate like and what sort of pine?
 

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Don't listen to him.

Here's what you do ...

Check first that you have full sun on a patch of ground at least 8-10 hours a day in Spring, Summer and early Fall.

Build raised beds in that area. Use landscape timbers (X4 timbers high) or 2" X 10" 's or 2" X 12" 's (untreated; the exterior treated timbers will leach toxins into the soil and the plants that you eat), place on edge in 4' X 8' or 5' X 10' rectangles. Screw together. (Check elsewhere in the gardening section here to see examples of this.) beds of this dimension allow you to pack a lot in a small area but it is easy to reach across for most people. You can also build squares four or five feet square if the other sizes are too big.

Place weed blocking landscape fabric on the entire bottom of the bed. This prevents weeds and grass sprouting up.

Fill those beds with a good mix natural ingredients to compensate for all of the acidic soil that your pine trees love but veggies don't.

Peat moss, top soil (from nursery - not potting soil - too expensive), compost (many municipalities give to away by the truck load) and manure. My favorite retail product is "Black Cow", but check Craigslist in your area. People often give away horse and cow manure from their barns, so you can save money that way.

Plant and watch things grow.

After the plants are a few inches high, place mulch around them to reduce weeds. I use cedar mulch because the natural cedar oils repel bugs which can eat your plants. Cedar (which is shredded rather than in cubes like pine bark mulch) won't float away in a heavy rain storm.

Check elsewhere i this gardening section for much advice on growing food crops.

Good luck to you! :)
He's looking for "guerilla gardening" tips mate, I dont think raised beds will go unnoticed.

Odell, what weeds and fungus do you see growing about? you can cultivate certain fungi, buy the spores online and follow the instructions, lots of salad type weed greens, see whats growing in your area, introduce some more of the same and anything else you think might grow. Doing this on the sly as in "guerilla gardening" can be hit and miss unless you research the different plants individualy. I dont know your area so I can onnly be vague sorry.

But I'd definately be sure to check whats there already.
 

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It is difficult to find a worse environment for growing beneficial plants than a sterile monoculture of pines where the forest floor is completely covered in pine needles; a condition that makes for highly acidic soil. That is the description given to us. And, the poster wants to use 'guerilla gardening' techniques, which means a stealth growing operation on someone else's property. This further limits the growing potential.

Raised beds won't work. There may not be any sun, and even if there were, they aren't very stealthy.

If the pines are mature, any plant requiring direct sun won't work. Most edible fungi feed off hardwoods, not coniferous trees. The only thing edible by humans I've ever seen in a pine forest are blackberries, and even then the plants were sparsely scattered in the few patches of indirect sunlight.

I think effort could be better spent pursuing a different strategy. Hell, you could grow much more on your rooftop or balcony than in a pine forest.
 

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He's looking for "guerilla gardening" tips mate, I dont think raised beds will go unnoticed.
I thought he must have been taking the ****. :xeye:

Planting mushrooms could work, although I don't know how useful to the OP that would be.
ETA: the forests around here have blue berries and cloud berries as well as a variety of mycorrhizal mushrooms, so perhaps that is something for the OP to consider. You can also find raspberries growing on the edges in places.

But I think stoneunhenged is right. I can't imagine it would be easy to grow much in a pine forest. But then I have always been doubtful of the viability of guerrilla gardening for most people anyway. If domesticated plants could compete with weeds we wouldn't have to spend so much time and effort growing gardens.
 

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I think that there are a lot of vegetables that could be grown that others wouldn't recognize out of the context of a garden. Even carrots or lettuce could be grown without people noticing to much if it was out in the middle of nowhere.

The best though, would probably be potatoes.

There are a ton of wild edibles, I wonder if any could be transplanted to a concentrated area.
 

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Sorry ... I interpreted it in a different way.

What does this statement mean? Is it some Swedish saying?

I thought he must have been taking the ****.
 

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Potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, peas, beans and onions will all grow in acidic soil. Also blueberry bushes, among others. Scatter them around the area, not grouping them together. Perhaps you can plant the berry bushes around the veggies as a visual screen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for the replys

My back yard is not as bad as the front and its in the south

I live in central north Carolina by the way

So I might be able to work around this problem also

Raised beds might not be to bad of an idea if I plant atractive plants that no one knows are edible

Thanks again
 

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Just for the record, I'm not that sharp, but if I came upon a tomato vine in the middle of a pine forest, I bet I would notice it. And if nobody was around, I'd eat the tomatoes.
 
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