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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Stihl has made some changes to their chainsaws that I honestly do not care for, such as that delayed start with the pull rope. And stihls seem to flood the carburetor rather easy.

Due to those factors I an thinking about getting a new husqvarna in the next few months.

One of my projects this spring and summer is clearing an old fence row, and I have a bunch of young sweetgum trees to cut down that shading my apple trees.

I am looking at around a 16 inch bar.

Someone who has experience with husqvarna educate me on the models that would be well suited for farm use. I need something that can cut oak firewood and handle smaller jobs.

The last time I had my stihl in the shop here in Jasper Texas the guy told me stihl no longer makes carburetor parts for my model. So it is just a matter of time before I have to buy a new chainsaw.

My current saw is a stihl woodsboss 28AV.
 
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Last husqvarna that I owned was a real lemon. It was always difficult to start, when it would start. Cut okay, just was hard to start, cold or hot. Less than 50 hours use and I retired it. Purchased a Poulan that does just as good a job and it will start. I no longer use a saw for serious wood cutting, just light trimming.
 

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Kev, are you talking about the easy start? I have the STIHL MS 181 C-BE and I love it. But I have to admit, I love a Husqvarna too. I have to have that delay pull rope, I can't pull a regular one because of the compression.
 

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I've got two 455 ranch/farm tough saws. They are about the biggest ones Lowes/HD sell. I bought one new and the other one on the cheap used from a friend. I give them little to no maintenance and they both run great. Only issue I've had was the chain break seized on one saw. Had to tear it to bits to get the side plate off. That break is not repairable. I think the new side plate was $70.

I also just picked up a Husky string trimmer. Have been using the Lowes Tory Bilt trimmers and they have both died. This new trimmer is so easy the restring the head I doubt I'll every shop around for a different trimmer.
 

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A Rebel at Heart!
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I have a husky 455 rancher and love it. It usually takes about 4 pulls to start but runs great. I have several iron oaks that I have cut with it and the saw never misses a beat. I use a dremmel to keep the chains sharp and it eats right through everything real fast. You can't go wrong with a husky. Best chainsaw I have owned and I have been through a few.
 

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Huskys professional saws are good saws, the line they sell at home improvement stores not so much

But STIHL also produces a better saw and a value saw so its a toss up

The EPA is cracking down on all 2 strokes so that why you are getting into the non adjustable carbs etc, I bought a new stihl last year to beat the new EPA regs
 

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I have gone the other way, had a little Husqvarna for lite work that often ended up doing some heavy cutting as well because it was such a great little saw and easy to use. It adventually died on me after many years of hard work and I have replaced it with a Stihl that runs on a rechargeable battery. Havent had the Stihl a year yet but have done a fair bit of work with it and so fare love it. It does some jobs better and some not as well as a regular chainsaw. Really good for jobs, like the OP described, of clearing fence lines, especaily if your working by your self as the saw can be placed on the ground between cuts while the wood is cleared away without worrying about the saw stalling. Lot quieter to operate as well, I don't bother with hearing protection with it.

The Stihl only has a 14 inch bar from memory but I have buried it to the hilt cutting through large hardwood logs without a problem. Been my experience that as long as the chain is sharp, a small saw will cut through any log, but obviously bigger saw will always cut better all other things being equal. I got a 80cc husky that can take a 24" bar for bigger jobs and find the 2 saws compliment each other well.

There seems a lot of consumer resistance towards battery operated saws, Husqvarna makes one as well, and they do cost more to buy, but in my opinion the extra cost is well worth it due to ease of use. May need 2 batterys if you plan on doing a lot of work. On good cutting wood I can about 3/4 fill a 1tonne truck with fire wood on a single charge probably a little less than a tank full of fuel on a regular small saw. I would recommend any one in the market for a small chain saw to give them a look at least.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Kev, are you talking about the easy start? I have the STIHL MS 181 C-BE and I love it. But I have to admit, I love a Husqvarna too. I have to have that delay pull rope, I can't pull a regular one because of the compression.
Yep, where you pull the rope and the engine turns over a few seconds later.
 

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I have gone the other way, had a little Husqvarna for lite work that often ended up doing some heavy cutting as well because it was such a great little saw and easy to use. It adventually died on me after many years of hard work and I have replaced it with a Stihl that runs on a rechargeable battery. Havent had the Stihl a year yet but have done a fair bit of work with it and so fare love it. It does some jobs better and some not as well as a regular chainsaw. Really good for jobs, like the OP described, of clearing fence lines, especaily if your working by your self as the saw can be placed on the ground between cuts while the wood is cleared away without worrying about the saw stalling. Lot quieter to operate as well, I don't bother with hearing protection with it.

The Stihl only has a 14 inch bar from memory but I have buried it to the hilt cutting through large hardwood logs without a problem. Been my experience that as long as the chain is sharp, a small saw will cut through any log, but obviously bigger saw will always cut better all other things being equal. I got a 80cc husky that can take a 24" bar for bigger jobs and find the 2 saws compliment each other well.

There seems a lot of consumer resistance towards battery operated saws, Husqvarna makes one as well, and they do cost more to buy, but in my opinion the extra cost is well worth it due to ease of use. May need 2 batterys if you plan on doing a lot of work. On good cutting wood I can about 3/4 fill a 1tonne truck with fire wood on a single charge probably a little less than a tank full of fuel on a regular small saw. I would recommend any one in the market for a small chain saw to give them a look at least.
Thanks for talking the electric saws. I will have to take a look at them

The reason the Husqvarna saws are better for a handy person is parts. The Stihl people restrict the sale of parts to their specific dealers which are not plentiful.
 

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I have three Husqvarna, a 455, a 450 and a smaller one my wife uses (240 something, I can't remember). All start easy and are super easy to maintain. The one my wife has is a joy to handle and does real well on smaller trees (12 inches or less). I feel the 455 and 450 are a little underpowered for sustained heavy use. They do just fine with spruce, and even the larger 20-24 inch thick one. We have some large burch trees, and cutting the older 20 or so inch thick trees is when you feel the saws could use a bit more power. I cut about 10-12 cords a year, plus clear a lot of brush so they get used. I'm happy with them for what I use them for.
 

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Be Prepared
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I have been in the tree service industry for 25 years or so and have have both types of saws as well as a few others. I suggest you pay up for a professional quality saw in either brand and you are not likely to be let down. You can buy garbage in either type of saw if you don't ask for a professional quality saw.

I find the husky is almost always takes a few more pulls to start but is a high speed cutting machine. Save up for the best they make and you will be happy for years.

Stillar
 

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I have been in the tree service industry for 25 years or so and have have both types of saws as well as a few others. I suggest you pay up for a professional quality saw in either brand and you are not likely to be let down. You can buy garbage in either type of saw if you don't ask for a professional quality saw.

I find the husky is almost always takes a few more pulls to start but is a high speed cutting machine. Save up for the best they make and you will be happy for years.

Stillar
Well said! I run pros from 242xp's up to 090 and a few dozen much more modern in between.

Stihls and huskys both make excellent pro saws, and companies such as echo and dolmar also produce some great ones. (seems husky and stihl are struggling with the concept of top handles though)
 

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16inch 346xp for five years now not had any trouble with the power head I cut a mx of cedar and oak all year long. Still have a 455 I bought at a box store definitely go with the pro grade saw
 

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I have a Husq 455 as well, and love it. That being said, if you have deep pockets and go to an actual dealer do yourself a favor and check out Stihl's pro line. They rev very high and put my Husq to shame- but be ready to spend 700+. I have 2 455s, and just swapped one of them from the standard 20" bar to a 16" when it needed replacing. Now I've got 2 saws I'm confortable with that meet different needs for reasonable cost.
 
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