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Discussion Starter #1
I'd enjoy hearing what your latest change was and why.

I haven't done it yet, but seeing ice on the ground and reading about Texas, et al., If I had to walk home in snow with my work boots is not too big of a deal, but I hadn't considered long stretches of ice that I might have to walk on. So when I get home, I'm attaching shoe ice grippers/cleats to my GHB.

If your latest change was removing something from your GHB, please post that. It's just as important :)

If there's an on-going thread about updating GHB, please link so I can follow that one instead.
 

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Wildlife Proctologist
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I have a GHB in my truck with the basics and tend to keep the seasonal items storage outside the bag. In the winter I have a blanket, extra knit cap, winter gloves, a tow strap, wool socks, etc. Conversly, in the spring those are replaced with things like sunscreen, a small container of buy spray, lighter wool blend socks, and a ball cap.

I also threw in an old day pack in case someone is with me and we can share the load. I am not sure if I would recommend buying one just to have a second bag but if you have one gathering dust then why not.
 

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I've kept a separate bag for clothes. Where I work it's dress shoes and business attire, nothing I want to walk any more than a mile in! While my bag remains fairly consistent, I'll update my clothes bag based on the season. We really don't have extended, extreme weather down here, but I will add in extra insulation for the winter. My ancillary stuff is actually in my pack and I keep it year round (wool hat, gloves, extra socks, etc.). I have on occasion swapped a hammock shelter system from spring to late summer with just a tarp and bivvy bag (with a quilt/poncho liner).

Those strap on cleats work. I've used them in the past and my wife and I both use them for winter hikes on icy trails or stretches of ice/packed snow on trails. A slip, trip, fall can quickly become a SHTF inside a SHTF!

ROCK6
 

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I’m waiting on a 5.11 rush 24 to get here and try out. My ghb was an older ACU digital molle 2 bag that was wore out and uncomfortable. Be nice to see if I need to bump up to the 72 or not. Either way, I’m putting multiple bags together for family members so the 24 will be good for one of the women that can’t carry much of a load that a bigger bag would have.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Those strap on cleats work. I've used them in the past and my wife and I both use them for winter hikes on icy trails or stretches of ice/packed snow on trails. A slip, trip, fall can quickly become a SHTF inside a SHTF!
good to know they work!

Denver's weather is really nice the vast majority of the year, so I haven't had a chance to try them.
 

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I'd enjoy hearing what your latest change was and why.

I haven't done it yet, but seeing ice on the ground and reading about Texas, et al., If I had to walk home in snow with my work boots is not too big of a deal, but I hadn't considered long stretches of ice that I might have to walk on. So when I get home, I'm attaching shoe ice grippers/cleats to my GHB.

If your latest change was removing something from your GHB, please post that. It's just as important :)

If there's an on-going thread about updating GHB, please link so I can follow that one instead.
Thats a good idea. A local store around me are blowing them out at $10 a pair. They figured global warming made them obsolete. I wonder if I can still snag a set.
 

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The last change was seasonal. Insulated shirts replaced t-shirts, wool tights and heavier socks were added, chemical handwarmers replaced chemical cold packs. In the vehicle itself - Over boots were added along with insulated coveralls. Items for icy road conditions added; cat litter, carpet, alcohol in a spray bottle.
 

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Capability, not scenarios
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I'd enjoy hearing what your latest change was and why.

I haven't done it yet, but seeing ice on the ground and reading about Texas, et al., If I had to walk home in snow with my work boots is not too big of a deal, but I hadn't considered long stretches of ice that I might have to walk on. So when I get home, I'm attaching shoe ice grippers/cleats to my GHB.

If your latest change was removing something from your GHB, please post that. It's just as important :)

If there's an on-going thread about updating GHB, please link so I can follow that one instead.
I've lived in the north most of my life. It seems second nature to be able to walk on ice or drive on slippery roads. They're just life-skills to acquire, but not that hard, provided you have a reason to know them.

Here's one interesting thing: ice is slippery because the pressure of a boot or tire upon it causes the ice to melt just a bit under the weight, and the coefficient of friction goes WAY down fast. If you walk outside from a warm building with warm boots, guess what's going to happen on ice? Yeah. As the boots cool down they'll be better at traction, but initially, look out.

This is why ice skates work well in temps down to about 10 degrees, and after that, they're less effective. The skate compresses the ice under it causing that momentary melt and slickness. Too cold and that can't happen.

A related phenomenon is this: when temps drop below about 10 degrees, snow becomes easier to drive on. It's so cold that the tires aren't able to overcome the temps to create that slick layer. And once below zero, snow-covered roads are nearly as easy to drive on as dry pavement, provided you're not trying to set land-speed records. But when the temps rise into the 20s, it's slippery-city. Same with walking.

Here's a trick I use when walking: when sidewalks are slippery with ice either from frozen snowmelt or from freezing rain, I'll walk on the grass or snow next to the sidewalk. If it's freezing rain and no snow, walk on the grass next to the sidewalk. As long as snow is low enough, same thing. In some cases, such as if there are snowbanks next to the sidewalk, that won't work, but you almost always can walk with one foot at the base of snowbanks and get purchase with your boots there.
 
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Finally got the rush 24, and I must say that for an Asian built (not China at least) bag my first impressions I’m pretty impressed with the quality. Time will tell with use. I will say it is smaller than I expected, but it is only a 24hr pack. It would get you through longer if you have bushcraft skills that let you do more with less Items. Haven’t had time to put anything in it yet, but i do foresee it being plenty for essentials and a change of clothes if you utilize the MOLLE on the outside to store things like your water and a knife and have a bedroll or sleeping bag strapped on the bottom. I’m going with a tarp shelter method so that saves a ton of room as well.

it’ll be well suited as a GHB, but I would go with the 72 or 100 if you want a BOB from 5.11
 

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These thread usually devolve into "I've added everything everyone has suggested, and it's still not heavy enough." So my only comment is: TEST IT.

My BOB will serve as a GHB should that be the wiser choice. Try a few test runs. If you find some things you don't need, take them out! Ounces equal pounds. If there is something you wish you had, add it. We all live in different areas, different climates, and in different situations. What works for one is not even close to appropriate for another. This is a situation where you need to evaluate what will work for you and what won't,. AND THEN TEST IT!

Anything untested, is nothing but a bag of false hope until it...ALL of it...proves itself. Same with all the rest of your preps, from food storage to water storage, to alternate energy and heat. Look at the lessons learned from us southerners in this recent cold snap. Some of our preps didn't work as we expected. ALL of this needs sorted out ahead of time. I don't mean to harp on this needlessly, but your life, and the life of those you love depends on it. TEST ABSOLUTELY EVERYTHING! Test it some more. Test it to failure. Upgrade, replace, fine tune, and TEST IT ALL AGAIN!
 

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The only recent update has been to add an ammunition bandolier for the Garand to the kit.
With the checking of the sights, its back on the line, at least part time, and just in case the ammunition was added.
 

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Capability, not scenarios
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These thread usually devolve into "I've added everything everyone has suggested, and it's still not heavy enough." So my only comment is: TEST IT.

My BOB will serve as a GHB should that be the wiser choice. Try a few test runs. If you find some things you don't need, take them out! Ounces equal pounds. If there is something you wish you had, add it. We all live in different areas, different climates, and in different situations. What works for one is not even close to appropriate for another. This is a situation where you need to evaluate what will work for you and what won't,. AND THEN TEST IT!

Anything untested, is nothing but a bag of false hope until it...ALL of it...proves itself. Same with all the rest of your preps, from food storage to water storage, to alternate energy and heat. Look at the lessons learned from us southerners in this recent cold snap. Some of our preps didn't work as we expected. ALL of this needs sorted out ahead of time. I don't mean to harp on this needlessly, but your life, and the life of those you love depends on it. TEST ABSOLUTELY EVERYTHING! Test it some more. Test it to failure. Upgrade, replace, fine tune, and TEST IT ALL AGAIN!
Great advice.

When I started all those years ago, I carried 50 rounds each of 9mm and .45ACP in my BOB/GHB. I'd always had a quandary about which caliber; I ended up thinking two is one and one is none (I'd have both pistols).

But....ever weighed 50 rounds of .45ACP with the 230-grain bullet? It's HEAVY. Close to 2 1/2 POUNDS. Add the 9mm and now we're at FOUR POUNDS.

All for pistol ammo. I asked myself two important questions: how many firefights do you expect to win? And, how many rounds do you REALLY need? More important than quantity is shot placement, and I practice regularly, so I will have a fighting chance.

I took out the .45ACP ammo. I still have 50 rounds of 9mm self-defense ammo in there, but I'm considering halving that. My goal is to avoid confrontation. The pistol is my last-resort defense mechanism; my first-resort defense mechanism is to avoid situations where I need to employ the last-resort, if I can.

Dead weight just makes you dead.
 
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