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under prepared patriot
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm new to this forum but I already feel right at home. Most of my friends and some of my family tend to think I'm some sort of nut, but when there amongst the starving hordes of people Ill have prepared. I'm only 18 and I live with my parents. However I have begun collecting everything I can for survival. I have gotten some great books on everything from wilderness survival to homesteading. I even started my own bug-out bag. so far I have a 9 inch stainless steel hunting knife, a magnesium fire starter, a compass and a few fishhooks. I realize I am grossly unprepared but I am doing the best I can as of now. I just got a job and I am going to add a new essential item weekly. As soon as I have some money laying around I am going to buy a gun. What would be the best all around survival gun? In John Seymour's book on self sufficiency. he says the .22 is the best for homesteading. Any thoughts or suggestions here?
 
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I'm new to this forum but I already feel right at home. Most of my friends and some of my family tend to think I'm some sort of nut, but when there amongst the starving hordes of people Ill have prepared. I'm only 18 and I live with my parents. However I have begun collecting everything I can for survival. I have gotten some great books on everything from wilderness survival to homesteading. I even started my own bug-out bag. so far I have a 9 inch stainless steel hunting knife, a magnesium fire starter, a compass and a few fishhooks. I realize I am grossly unprepared but I am doing the best I can as of now. I just got a job and I am going to add a new essential item weekly. As soon as I have some money laying around I am going to buy a gun. What would be the best all around survival gun? In John Seymour's book on self sufficiency. he says the .22 is the best for homesteading. Any thoughts or suggestions here?
18 and smart ... that's a great starting point. John Seymour was a good choice in the bookstore. Next time you go back, get a good book on medicinal herbs and start studying it. (The bigger the better ... with a really good index.)

I offer no advice about guns, sorry. But lots of other forum members do, so you'll get at least a few suggestions I'm sure.

Let me leave you with this thought ... Essential items aren't all made of metal. Concentrate on developing your gardening skills etc as well because I'm willing to bet you're going to need them one day.

Good luck.
:)
 

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What would be the best all around survival gun? In John Seymour's book on self sufficiency. he says the .22 is the best for homesteading.
Get ready to hear as many different opinions as there are people. Here's mine:

For homesteading a .22 is the best choice. This is considering that you won't have to carry all your ammo on your back. You can leave a stockpile of .22 ammo at home, and only take with you what you need when you go hunting.

If you find yourself living in the wild without a homestead, I would pass on the .22 and bring a high velocity air rifle. The reason being that you now have to carry all of your ammo, and because pellets are much smaller and lighter than .22 ammo, you can carry thousands of them without burden.

Then comes the question of defense against wild animals. Some argue that if you take proper precautions you will never need to defend yourself from a wild animal. My argument is that sh-t happens and it's better to be safe than sorry. My weapon of choice here is a shotgun. And by the way, a shotgun can take down a deer if the opportunity presents itself, something that a .22 would be lucky to do, and an air rifle has no hope of doing.

I wish there were a single all-purpose gun that could handle every possible scenario, but there is not. I own a 12 gauge shotgun, a .357 Magnum revolver, and a .177 air rifle. I believe that this combination gives me the greatest versatility in the wild.

Just my opinion.
 

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under prepared patriot
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the advice I have been working on some gardening skills but only through reading unfortunately. I live in the suburbs and we have a rat problem so we had to throw grass seed on our vegetable garden :( Looking forward to some more replies!
 

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Animis opibusque parati
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I'm new to this forum but I already feel right at home. Most of my friends and some of my family tend to think I'm some sort of nut, but when there amongst the starving hordes of people Ill have prepared. I'm only 18 and I live with my parents. However I have begun collecting everything I can for survival. I have gotten some great books on everything from wilderness survival to homesteading. I even started my own bug-out bag. so far I have a 9 inch stainless steel hunting knife, a magnesium fire starter, a compass and a few fishhooks. I realize I am grossly unprepared but I am doing the best I can as of now. I just got a job and I am going to add a new essential item weekly. As soon as I have some money laying around I am going to buy a gun. What would be the best all around survival gun? In John Seymour's book on self sufficiency. he says the .22 is the best for homesteading. Any thoughts or suggestions here?

Check the firearms section, there are evolving battles about this subject.

Welcome
 

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It’s good that your trying/preparing to be self sufficient with gardening and the book on homesteading. You said you are collecting/gathering everything you can that is survival related. But how are you going with food? Have you started to buy the staples yet? Because it would be wise if you bought at least a week (a month even better, even if it’s rations) worth of foods as soon as your able to afford it. Because if you got a gun first and SHTF, well you’ll be fine protection wise, but hunger, you can’t ignore for long.

So I suppose if your doing preparation a little bit at a time, don’t focus too much time on one thing, try and spread out the different areas you need to prepare in. Because if SHTF, at lest you’ll have a little of everything you need. Good luck with the preparing. I know it’s hard preparing when you live at home with your parents, my parents have finally come around to the idea now, which it good. So just give them (parents) a little time, as well as a gentle nudge in the right direction, like talking about the news and current affairs, make them more aware. I wouldn’t go openly talking about your preparations with people outside your family, because it could cause troubles further on down the track.
 

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Hey. I'm only a few years older than you, so maybe my advice will help.

First, you should think long and hard about what sort of scenario you are planning to survive. Personally, I'm only in this because of peak oil and the potential for scarcity of petroproducts. But preppers come in all forms, from the down-right loony (remember Y2k?) to the most practical (living in flood/disaster zone). Whatever your reason, I suggest you step back and take a good look at why you're prepping. I'm not knocking preparedness in general, it's always a good idea to be prepared, but making it a focus in your life might not be the best priority for you.

Once you've sorted that out, try and find some informed information about possible scenarios that would happen after whatever catastrophic event you're prepping for. For example, in a flood you might have to evacuate your house and move to higher ground, or you may be required to bunker down in the attic and wait for a rescue. In these situations, you might not need 2 years of food stored in your basement. A .243 hunting rifle might not be as useful, in an urban defense situation as, say, a 12g shotgun. So tailor your preps around that. I think one of the major problems with preparedness, writ large, is the propensity of preppers to commodify survivalism. I mean, is about half of the discussion that goes on is about gear. And yes, gear is important, but you don't need to break the bank to hedge out your chances of survival. I bought most of my preps piecemeal. I think it works best to adjust your attitude on consumption. Buy only what you need. Buy good, high quality items and reduce the amount of waste your produce. Learn how to make things for yourself. It's a good skill now and a better skill when SHTF.

Second, I'd advise you to get in contact with other like-minded people. I've taken classes on wild food foraging, learned about permaculture and sustainable farming, and gained some really valuable experience- all for free (well, for my time and labor).

As for specific advice: buy a 19 gallon rubermade container, or similar large box. fill it with non-perishable food. Look up advice on this, but mine has olive oil, flour, pinto beans, salt, honey, rice, noodles, peanut butter, and canned tuna. Then put it in your closet. Ever year, rotate half of the food. This will give you a decent supply of food (mine is around 3 weeks for one person). I also have a medical kit, containing some veterinary antibiotics (be careful with these, get more information before you buy, outdated antibiotics can be deadly). I figure, in a major scarcity situation, this buys me some time. Additionally, if I ever lost my job, or suffered another economic blow, this would help me get through the rough times.

I hope this helps. If you have any questions, feel free to ask.
 

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The end is near.
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You've already got shelter covered for now. I'd say to go for the food and water next. Food and water aren't as much fun as firearms and other equipment, but the need is pretty apparent when you get hungry and thirsty.

For water you can cut back on the amount you have to store by getting a good filter so you can purify local water from ponds and steams. For food, just look at the canned goods you already eat and purchase some each week until you've got yourself enough to eat every day for a month or two. Might want to prep for your family as well. A storage shed might work for you if your family is dead set against you preparing under their roof.

As for firearms, we have a firearms section here that is excellent. Go ask there.
 

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Stick with it young buck, you'll do fine!

I got started at 13. By 14 I had lied about my age in order to hook up with a starting up survival group. They had a couple outings but couldn't get together on things. Found an ex-SF Vietnam vet not long after and learned quite a bit from him. Always had the survival bug, very rarely strayed. Got into cars and junior bling bling type stuff for a short time between 16 and 17, but that was about it.

Don't get too concerned about keeping up with the survival Joneses. Cover your basics as you can afford to- food, water filter, basic gear and rifle.

A lot of folks get into this "I have to get the best!" non-sense. That can end up killing budgets early on.

Waiting to get the "ultimate" rifle for 2 years while you save up, or having a 10/22 within reach now? I'll choose the later. As time goes on, you can upgrade gear.

Good luck to you!
Lowdown3
 

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Don't get too concerned about keeping up with the survival Joneses. Cover your basics as you can afford to- food, water filter, basic gear and rifle.

A lot of folks get into this "I have to get the best!" non-sense. That can end up killing budgets early on.

Waiting to get the "ultimate" rifle for 2 years while you save up, or having a 10/22 within reach now? I'll choose the later. As time goes on, you can upgrade gear
A big +1 to that. Buy yourself a plain vanilla 10/22. Stay away from all the fancy gimmick BS attachments and learn to use it. Keep it clean and it will most likely outlive you. Ruger has been making these things longer than I've been alive. They haven't changed much, they got it right. Buy several different brands of ammo first, find a brand that you and the rifle can agree on, then buy a butt load of it. You'll do your self a far greater service in the long run. Just my 2 pennies.
 

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under prepared patriot
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
thanks

Thanks a bunch for all the advice everyone. this is my first day here and I already feel at home! Its great to find like minded people and those with more experience.:D
 

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Freedom Is Not Free
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1. Dont' rack up credit card debt trying to prep. Don't buy on impulse.\
2. Do you live somewher you can practice with the .22 ur plannig on getting?
3. I add to my food preps every week by forcing myself to pickup at least five things mixed in w/ the regular grocery shopping.
4. Choose your approach carefully wuth your parents. Maybe phrase stocking up as a way to cut food costs. You 18 and probably eat like a horse (I did). So help the folks out by easing them into it.
 

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under prepared patriot
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I live in the burbs in buffalo NY. I really want to get out to the country with some acreage. I guess that's one way I differ from my friends, I'm not really interested in clubbing I'm more interested in homesteading. lol
 

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Is the area you live prone to short blackouts? Whether it be from the bad weather or over use of air conditioning systems, or something similar along these lines. Or is one of your parents haven’t got the best of health? These could be conversation openers for you. I agree with mangyhyena, if you only stock some food for yourself and you live with your family it’s going to cause problems. So that’s why I asked if their was any possible cause to a power shortage or health reasons, because if you make your parents realize that it is a logical thing to put away a couple of tubs/boxes of food for “those emergencies” and if people don’t have good health, it can hinder their chances of preparing enough at the last minute (for “those emergencies” of course), it might make them think about putting aside some food/water. But if your family has good health, an excuse you could use (that is of your parents are completely against the idea of you storing food for “dooms day”) is that your concerned about one of your grandparents, that you would feel safer knowing the fact that if they have a fall or break a bone and they can’t go shopping, you have some food for them. I don’t know how well these scenarios would work. But I assume you get the drift, think out side of the box with how you can counter your parents non interest – without coming across to your parents as an “alarmist” or “nut”.
 

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under prepared patriot
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
my parents agree with me to a fault my mom thinks I may be going over the deep end but I argue my case for future problems pretty well. My dads fairly on board he even likes the idea of a bug-out bag. weather or not my parents are fully on board Ill be doing whatever I can to prepare. Thanks for the tip Arwen, and we dont get blackouts but we do get bad winter weather so theres a thought to...
 

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Freedom Is Not Free
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I live in the burbs in buffalo NY. I really want to get out to the country with some acreage. I guess that's one way I differ from my friends, I'm not really interested in clubbing I'm more interested in homesteading. lol
I worked for 2 months in Arcade NY about an hour south of U. pretty rural area. That might be a directio nto think of. Don't know what land values are though.
 

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under prepared patriot
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
mmm Arcade is a good idea im thinking southtowns or maybe even genesee county
 
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