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Outdoorsman and Hunter
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Kev, recently posted an excellent article on "Get Home Bags" at his blog here...

http://www.survivalboards.com/2011-06-20/ideas-for-a-get-home-bag/

I encourage everyone to read it. I also thought it might be useful to expand on this as a thread. Based on what Kev wrote and my own thoughts I think this item is different than a BOB, which we have many threads on. Here are the key points I thought it was different...

1. The purpose of the GHB (Get Home Bag) is simply to give you some very basic supplies to get home in the event of an emergency.

2. To be effective it pretty much needs to be with you or easily accessible in your car at all times.

3. Because of item 2 it probably has to be small and light weight.

I have often thought of this concept because I have traveled to some places that are pretty sparse and should I ever be stranded there or in the case of an emergency I need some supplies to pull me through and get me to a safe place or home.

Here are some things I was thinking of adding to the suggestions Kev had...

1. Peanut butter and honey - Excellent for protein and quick carbs

2. Tracphone - Sometimes you will need to communicate and may have lost your phone or not have one. Also depending on how you purchased this it has the added benefit of not being connected to your name.

3. Pre-Paid Calling Card - If you are far away you may need a way to make long distance calls via pay phones or via the Tracphone. Again, if paid for in cash this also isn't linked to you personally.

4. Cash - Kev suggests $20, but I am thinking I might need more. Especially if I am far from home and need to arrange for hotels, travel, etc. I think I would boost this to $300 cash plus a pre-paid debit card with an additional $500 on it.

5. Water Filtration Kit - Some may argue this is more BOB material, but I thought if I am ever stranded somewhere and need to find potable water having a small water filtration kit could be the difference between life and death. Especially if I am stuck someplace remote.

6. Weapon - I debated with this one. Many of us already carry handguns regularly and may not need this, but some don't and having access to a weapon in a situation that may be dangerous could be important.

I would love to know about other people's thoughts and ideas for this.
 

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Kev, recently posted an excellent article on "Get Home Bags" at his blog here...

http://www.survivalboards.com/2011-06-20/ideas-for-a-get-home-bag/
Holy crap, someone actually reads my blog?

Thank you.

Your list brings up some good points, especially the $20 thing. $20 in todays money is not going to get you very far, especially with gas. If I put $20 in my truck, it usually gets me about a 1/4 tank, and that is not much. To get a 1/2 tank of gas, it usually takes about $40.

The peanut butter is an excellent idea.

For a water filter, even something like a AquaMira Frontier Pro UQC water filter would be better then nothing. When the word "water filter" is mentioned, people think of this complex device that cost a lot of money, that is not always the case.


 

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I have been thinking about putting a GHB together, so this is a very timely post. My wife and I work at the same company and ride to and from together. Our commute is about 9 miles each way, mostly local roads but a small stretch of I-95 and a major bridge.

I always have 2 handguns and an extra mag for each in my vehicle. We both have CCW's so if we had to leave the vehicle we can legally carry them.

My dilemma is heat. We live in NE Florida, and it gets extremely hot. In a vehicle even more so. I have covered parking at work and a garage at home, but it can still get well over 100 degrees, much more so if left out in the open on a sunny day.

So what are heat tolerant foods that could be stored? I know heat is a killer for many food preps. Also what are the effects of heat on bottled water? Would the heat cause an increase of nastiness leaching from the plastic?

Also, we have been dealing with wildfires lately so adding some protective dust/particulate masks would be a good idea.
 

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Www.preparedham.com
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Food for heat: Stuff like to Coast Guard approves for survival food like Datrex, SOS or Mainstay MainStay survival bars

Details of MainStay (I have not tried these although I have several

These calorie food bars taste like a lemon butter cookie and provide calories for one person for up to 3 days. Easily broken into 400 calorie segments and forified with vitamins A, B1, B2, B7, B12, D, E and other nutrients. Mainstay™ calorie food bars are prepared under strict supervision in their own bakery to ensure consistent quality and freshness. KEY BENEFITS: *5 year shelf life. *Non-Thirst Provoking. *Withstands Temperatures of -40 deg F to 300 deg F. *Ready to Eat: Each package contains 9 pre-measured 400 calorie meals. *Individualized portions eliminate the messy breaking-up that occurs with other bars. *Allows for on-land emergency consumption in a high-stress active situation. *Contains no cholesterol or tropical oils. *Meets the US Coast Guard standards. It's new modern packaging even meets the stringent guidelines set by the Department of Defense. *Enriched with vitamins and minerals exceeding the RDA requirements. Mainstay™ is Kosher and it meets the dictates for Halal. *Pleasant lemon flavor which appeals to everyone. Enough to sustain and individual for 24 hours. AVAILABLE SIZES: 3,600 Calorie Size (9 pre-measured 400 Calorie Meals); 2,400 Calorie Size (6 pre-measured 400 Calorie Meals); and 1,200 Calorie Size (3 pre-measured 400 Calorie Meals).

For Water storage try stainless steel. Weighs more but no leaching.
 

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Lux in Tenebris
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I have created the GHB in the attached pics to allow me to survive in place for several days or more, and make my way home comfortably along the way...

This is also used for normal day to day issues that may arise, car break downs, minor medical emergencies, etc....

Food is mainstay rations, 3 3600 cal bars...100 oz camelback and various ways to collect and purify h2o as well...multiple firemaking options, signaling, etc...

shelter is a tarp and bungee cords or 550...

i have a goretex rainsuit too, which can double as a sleep system...

Check the pics ,you'll figure it out, if not comment..

i also keep a locked trunk box with other items, like a complete change of clothes and rugged boots, extra socks...

I always a couple hundred bucks cash on me too....

This kit stays in car at all times, never had any issues with heat or cold....secured with the pacsafe mesh thingy...

Hope this helps...
 

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PSY

Do you keep the Camelbak full or empty?
 

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Psy

Does your mouth piece come with a shutoff valve? After soaking many things, I switched to this and it works great for about $9


Marketing Drivel:
Top Features of the Camelbak Ergo Hydrolock Shut Off Valve

The 90-degree bend in CamelBak's Ergo HydroLock puts the Big Bite Valve into an ergonomic position for drinking. With a simple flip, the on/off mechanism can be activated or shut off to turn off water flow for transport.

Shut-off valve lets you control liquid flow.
Turn on when you need it; off when you don't.
90-degree bend perfectly positions the Big Bite Valve for easy drinking.


OR you can get the ones that we use at our company(for our mine blast seats with hydration) for the Mil Spec versions


About $8 at Amazon Camelbak Mil Spec bite and shutoff
 

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Lux in Tenebris
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6,915 Posts
Psy

Does your mouth piece come with a shutoff valve? After soaking many things, I switched to this and it works great for about $9


Marketing Drivel:
Top Features of the Camelbak Ergo Hydrolock Shut Off Valve

The 90-degree bend in CamelBak's Ergo HydroLock puts the Big Bite Valve into an ergonomic position for drinking. With a simple flip, the on/off mechanism can be activated or shut off to turn off water flow for transport.

Shut-off valve lets you control liquid flow.
Turn on when you need it; off when you don't.
90-degree bend perfectly positions the Big Bite Valve for easy drinking.

It will now! Thanks mate...gonna hit REI tomorrow... :thumb:
 

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Outdoorsman and Hunter
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Holy crap, someone actually reads my blog?
You bet! I think your blog is AWESOME! I probably coast by at least once every couple of days to see what you put on there.

The peanut butter is an excellent idea.
Can't claim credit for this. I stole it from you :) It was in one of your previous posts on BOB I just re-used it for this.

I have been thinking about putting a GHB together, so this is a very timely post. My wife and I work at the same company and ride to and from together. Our commute is about 9 miles each way, mostly local roads but a small stretch of I-95 and a major bridge.
I guess I was thinking when I started this that I envisioned a combo "Get Home Bag" and survival kit all rolled in one. I travel to some remote areas every now and then where a survival kit in case of emergencies would be good, but a full blown BOB is probably too much as I am not really bugging out and if things go well don't expect to have to, but the Great Murphy sometimes comes and visits when we least expect it.

I have created the GHB in the attached pics to allow me to survive in place for several days or more, and make my way home comfortably along the way...

This is also used for normal day to day issues that may arise, car break downs, minor medical emergencies, etc....

Food is mainstay rations, 3 3600 cal bars...100 oz camelback and various ways to collect and purify h2o as well...multiple firemaking options, signaling, etc...

shelter is a tarp and bungee cords or 550...

i have a goretex rainsuit too, which can double as a sleep system...

Check the pics ,you'll figure it out, if not comment..

i also keep a locked trunk box with other items, like a complete change of clothes and rugged boots, extra socks...

I always a couple hundred bucks cash on me too....

This kit stays in car at all times, never had any issues with heat or cold....secured with the pacsafe mesh thingy...
Awesome suggestions!
 

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Lux in Tenebris
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Bear in mind, this is a GHB first and foremost, allowing me to get home to wifey and Bug In Place, in relative comfort and security with all my goodies, family and neighbors around me....
 

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Outdoorsman and Hunter
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thought of a few more items...

1. Fire starter kit

2. Aluminum foil for cooking

3. Space blanket for heat if I need it.
 

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Outdoorsman and Hunter
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
One more thing...

Kev, did a review on this, but I can't find it. It was a little folding stove that you can build a little fire in. It folds down flat.

Kev, if you know what I am talking about and can remember where you posted the review of this I would love it if you posted in thread.
 

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Www.preparedham.com
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IF you have a really long walk home this Camelbak might come in handy


It even has shoulder straps :thumb: We supplies these in vehicle kits for our seats to refill the the 100oz Camelbaks attached to the seat so the soldier does not have to deplete his personal water supply while riding in a vehicle.

I have two of these sitting on my office coffee table. One just may find its way home with me.

Marketing Drivel:
Squad Bak Capacity: 845 oz (25 L) The Squad - Bak eliminates the need for awkward and inefficient jerry cans in the field. Whether hanging in the barracks, an armored vehicle or aircraft, the 25L Reservoir solves the problem of refilling Camel - Bak systems while deployed. Quickly backfill by connecting drinking tubes via two Hydro - Link connection points. Or use the large diameter hose to refill through reservoir fillports. Once empty, the system lays flat and can be stored easily due to its flexible design. -litre Water Beast Reservoir with Hydro - Guard Inhibits the growth of bacteria that can cause odors, discoloration or deterioration of the reservoir and tube surfaces. (Does not protect user against disease-causing organisms. Always wash reservoir after use.) Quickly backfills up to 3 Camel - Bak Hydration systems at a time 1/2" diameter, l


CAMELBAK-SquadBak-color-foliage-green/dp/B002Q1KPXI
 
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i pretty much have everything you guys have posted in my ghb but i use a standard wal mart day hiker pack for about 15 bucks; tons of pockets and has the bladder compartment; which i removed the bladder and opted for a 1 qt platypus fold up; takes up less space; more durable than a bladder; weighs nothing literally, and doesnt leave a funky taste in your mouth from water sitting in it for a while. its so called " green" certified- whatever that means. crank radio/led light a wal mart camo hunting poncho that can be made into a tent with 2 broken carbon fiber arrow shafts to use in emergency to make a V tent in the ground. oh; a lot of zip ties and a couple of those 50 gallon extra durable garbage bags. all my zipper pulls were removed and replace with 550 paracord woven into cobra knots 2 feet per zip ( equals 2 inches woven) to take up less space. a first aid kit i managed to fit inside a spice container with everything you need for a day or so plus tons of extra goodies. oh one thing to have handy in ur pack is the us army field survival guide; i stripped off the front and back of that book and cut down the front and back of a maxim magazine for the cover ( for OPSEC LOL)

EDIT: oh, and a titanium 6" prybar, a deck of playing cards, and a harmonica
 

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Bush Walker
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I have no need for a bug out bag - when the SHTF I have a days walk to get to my BOL.



I DO however, need a GHB and have packed one up in a Maxped Falcon II ( after Kevs review)


Peanut butter is a great idea! I never seem to know what food Ill need to get home on - at worst Ill need to do an overnight before getting back home. Walk from work is 13 miles and as long as I can make it outta the city over the bridge I should be good to go


Kev does great work - I love his videos and there should be a focus on GHB seeing as how we all leave the house almost daily and an EMP can ruin a good day any day
 

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Excellent topic. For me this is one thing I worry about. See I commute into Phila via train each day. Plus my employer has strict rules against any firearms in our building. Currently I carry no preps with me to and from work. Its about 40 miles each way. I suppose I should consider adding a small GHB to to my work bag to include some of the items listed. For protection, at very least, a knife. If I'm at work and all hell breaks loose, including the electric going down, I would have a considerable walk home, part of which would be through some tough areas.
 
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