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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Finally got a chance to get out to the cabin today. After cooking up some sausages over the fire, I set up my new German army poncho as a tent in several configurations.

The first few pics show the "sleeping" configuration. It's close quarters, but can be closed pretty much completely, something you don't get with most tarps. Of course, you can open one or both side flaps and throw it over the top or tie it to another tree, making a little overhang to keep out rain and let in heat from a fire.

I took my grandpa's WWII navy blanket, folded it in half and then sewed it across the bottom and 3/4 of the way up the side. I then took a space blanket, folded it over and taped it together (totally waterproof). Putting the wool blanket inside the space blanket makes for a decent sleeping bag and keeps out moisture from the ground.

The next tarp configuration is the "daytime good weather" setup. It's just your basic A-frame. The blankets can be folded up to make a warm and comfy seat.

The last configuration is the "daytime bad weather" setup. The rear opening is buttoned up completely. I had to raise the tie line here. This setup will keep out the wind and rain and let me sit in the middle with a fire going outside.

Not bad for 9 Euros, eh? BTW, I am over 6' tall, and I can lay down straight in the sleeping configuration.

Edit: Of course, the tarp can also be tied higher up off the ground and used as a roof for a hammock or set up as an open lean-to on the ground. In addition to this poncho, I carry a much thinner, lighter plastic poncho for actual use as a poncho in the rain.

The last pic shows how I attached the poncho and blankets to my Finnish army gas mask bag. The poncho acts as a shoulder pad and there is an extra pair of socks, boxers and a t-shirt rolled up in the blankets. The bag has the same contents as my "What's in your daypack?" post, except I also added a small frying pan, olive oil, salt and pepper, a scrub pad and some toilettries. There's still room for food in there. This setup plus my 2 liter wineskin full of water and fixed-blade knives would be enough gear for a short camping trip. The great thing is that all the stuff together doesn't way much at all. :D:
 

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Earthwalker.
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I like the set ups you have show here,very good indeed,you know i will have to try these out.:thumb:

Good job,thanks:D:
 

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very cool ive got my gi poncho set up as sml dome i got the info off if another website but i like some of these better thnks gunman
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I'm seriously coveting that cabin.
The german fleck poncho is like the US woodland poncho,kinda a nylon ripstop material.
I wish they were mine. :( They belong to my wife's family. One of my favorite places to be in the world.
 

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I’ve used a poncho tent system for a long time because it is a versatile piece of kit. The short coming with my poncho is the size, at 5’x7’. I’m about 6 feet tall, which means I may only have 6 inches of clearance at my feet and head before one end of me is out in the rain. If wind blown rain is present then I would be getting wet. Additionally, when winter camping or out for a few days I carry a larger pack. There isn’t a lot of extra room inside when using a poncho tent. Two ponchos can be utilized, with one for overhead cover and the other for a bivy sack, or to make a larger overhead shelter. The downside is that I will still be lacking storage space when going the shelter/bivy setup or face leaks when snapping two ponchos together.

I have since upgraded to a 10’x10’ urethane coated rip stop nylon tarp I bought from Campmor for $40. It rolls up almost the same size, if not smaller, than two ponchos for the same weight. This gives me far greater options. I could probably fit four to five people and their packs under it if camping / bugging out with a group. If by myself or another with another person, there is ample space to sleep, store our gear and firewood, and have room for camp chores too. I still keep the poncho packed for an emergency shelter if day hiking, and as worn rain gear or a bivy sack.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
I’ve used a poncho tent system for a long time because it is a versatile piece of kit. The short coming with my poncho is the size, at 5’x7’. I’m about 6 feet tall, which means I may only have 6 inches of clearance at my feet and head before one end of me is out in the rain. If wind blown rain is present then I would be getting wet. Additionally, when winter camping or out for a few days I carry a larger pack. There isn’t a lot of extra room inside when using a poncho tent. Two ponchos can be utilized, with one for overhead cover and the other for a bivy sack, or to make a larger overhead shelter. The downside is that I will still be lacking storage space when going the shelter/bivy setup or face leaks when snapping two ponchos together.

I have since upgraded to a 10’x10’ urethane coated rip stop nylon tarp I bought from Campmor for $40. It rolls up almost the same size, if not smaller, than two ponchos for the same weight. This gives me far greater options. I could probably fit four to five people and their packs under it if camping / bugging out with a group. If by myself or another with another person, there is ample space to sleep, store our gear and firewood, and have room for camp chores too. I still keep the poncho packed for an emergency shelter if day hiking, and as worn rain gear or a bivy sack.
My tarp is also 5' x 7', and I am about 6'1". The key to my head or feet not sticking out in the rain is keeping the poncho grommets close to the ground with lightweight tent pegs. That way, I can't move out into the rain. I don't know if you can see it in the picture, but the flaps at the "head" area are secured to the ground with a tent peg.

These setups are not necessarily intended for winter camping, camping with 5 people inside etc etc etc. The configurations I showed above are really more for minimalist/lightweight/survival camping for one or two nights in the spring/summer/fall. I have a whole other setup for longer trips/more people/winter, i.e. tent, sleeping bags, large backpacks etc.
 
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