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In the Arizona dust
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Howdy,
I searched for this but didn't find any info on it. Any of you have experience with Gerber axes? I have a few knives and i'm impressed with them, but never been able to hold and examine one of their axes. I was looking at this one: Gerber Sport Axe. There's also the "camp axe" model, which looks too small to even be effective in my opinion.

Any feedback on Gerber axes, or trustworthy camp axes would be great. I don't want one with a wood handle, it seems every one i get the head flies off after a bit of abuse.

Thanks,
- Tyler
 

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Gerber is made by Fiskars which lots of times is cheaper for the same thing with maybe a slightly different coloured handle but everything else is the same...Gerber used to have five models and a couple of splitting axes (mauls) but only Fiskars carries the full range now…

The blade shape makes all of them cut quite deeply into the wood but their lighter weight means that you have to chop more energetically to achieve the same results with a heavier wood handled one…There is a pocket sharpening tool that they carry that you should get as well as the blade profile is quite different from other axes….

I have found that the super small one, Back Paxe (8.88”) is almost useless although it makes a really nice wedge for splitting wood when hammered with something else and can be useful in splitting a moose's breastbone apart but just lacks any fulcrum to chop trees with...

The next one up, the Sport (14.25”) is what I’ve always thought a hatchet should be, size wise…they work very well at chopping small trees, limbing, splitting and general camp chores…they’re also light and fit well in a multi day pack…

The Camp (17.5”) is an oddball in that it’s just a little too large to pack easily and just a little too small to be good at chopping things but works surprisingly well in a hatchet’s capacity just not an axe’s!

The one I have with me in the bush quite a lot is the Fiskars Chopper (23.5”) which does everything quite well even on slightly larger trees, very light to carry, excellent leverage for the size of trees, heavy enough head for weight it’s just not a felling axe like the XL is…You could easily make a log lean-to and fire break but it would just a little too small to build a log cabin with…It’s just like the “HBC Cruiser” axes 1½ lb head, 24” handle I used to (and still do) carry…It’s a compromise piece, good for camping, hunting, on the trap line, chopping ice out of the lake…

The XL is a true felling axe and works well at it…being lighter then a wood handled one it does lack a little momentum to the mass but the lighter weight makes it easier to swing…

Two USA makers you might want to check out are Estwing (hatchets and cruiser axe) and Firestone made by McGowan…The leather handled Sportsman’s Axe is a true classic and I just love the Firestone Hand axe as it works so well as a skinning blade (like an Ulu) as well as being a small hatchet and for only $30…Forgot, there's also Marble's

There are lots of Euro makers around now and their products are excellent, for the most part, but they are also damn expensive…Makers like Gränsfors Bruks, Wetterlings, Iltis Ox-Head etc…

My choice is the Firestone hatchet and a cruiser axe with a folding or takedown saw (Wyoming) in my pack...

Hope this helps...
 

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Svensk hamster
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I have a couple of axes made by Fiskars and they are excellent. You will not be disappointed with the Gerber axe, and if you can find a Fiskars for less money it is even better.
 

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The Jed.
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Everything Seekher just said is absolutley true. The Pack Axe is Almost useless unless you have the forearm of Andre the Giant. Their heads are very light, I mean very light, it makes them feasible to hike with, however you will have to put more energy into each swing. That's their main advandtage, their portability and their grind, the grind on those axes is arguably the best one from a factory I have ever seen. The camp axe does work well as a hatchet, albeit a large one as Seek said. Hope a second opinion helps. But trust this guy, he knows what he's talking about.
 
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i was offered to use the hatched at work to drive stakes, and after 1 stake i threw it in the truck and never looked at it again. this think sucks at driving stakes into the ground, the head is to light and the butt to small. Also take a look at how the handle hooks up with the head, if you break a handle you cannot replace it, andthe axe is useless. I personally carry a Gränsfors Bruks Scandinavian Forest Axe which fits nicely straped to my badlands 2200. it will outchop a gerber axe many times over, and in the northern canadian winter you need a quality axe
 

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I have found that the super small one, Back Paxe (8.88”) is almost useless although it makes a really nice wedge for splitting wood when hammered with something else and can be useful in splitting a moose's breastbone apart but just lacks any fulcrum to chop trees with...
This is the key to that axe.
you're pretty much dead on, this axe wasn't designed to be primarily swung like a standard campaxe.
It CAN be to chop down smaller trees with some effort, but the handle was primarily intended as a handhold while you "hammer" on the flat back surface of the head.

A larger type fixed blade can also be an effective (ish) chopper/splitter by using this technique.

I have one of these in my smaller BOB, and again, it is OK, if you realize how it was intended be used and it's limitations.
 

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In the Arizona dust
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you very much SeekHer, I've looked through all those sites and i've decided on the Fiskars 23" Chopper. Some of those Firestone blades look AWESOME btw, I'd like to get one of their hatchets some day, bit pricey though.
 

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I bought the Gerber sport axe last year to keep in my tool box on my truck. It has come in handy on the deer lease in the piney wood of Texas quite a few times in the past 12 months. Its light weight and easy to handle. But, like stated before, it takes alittle more elbow grease to get the job done.
 

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Thank you very much SeekHer, I've looked through all those sites and i've decided on the Fiskars 23" Chopper. Some of those Firestone blades look AWESOME btw, I'd like to get one of their hatchets some day, bit pricey though.
Which is why I suggested the HandAxe for $39.95 MSRP and the PocketAxe, $9.95 MSRP, has the same problems as the Gerber, size wise, but the blade and handle angles make it work a lot better...Which is why they're such good axes, their ergonomics...

I love my Belt Axe and feel it's worth the $155.95 price tag (paid under $100 for mine) and carry that but my daughters mostly have the HandAxe...

When we're car/boat camping then we use their SportAxe $79.95 MSRP which is also great if you attend BP fur trade reenactments/Rendezvous because it is a superb thrower besides being excellent at camp chores...

You'll be very happy with the 23" just remember that it takes a little more "oomph" on your part...

As much as I like them I'm still very partial to wood handled choppers and especially my Lee Reeves Axes

These guys carry a very good selection of tools, Off the Map Outfitters but check a few other sources for pricing...

For something a little different check out Tuatahi Racing Saws and my oh my do they cut a lot of wood per swing!

The Firestones, have what is referred to as an Ulu head...The Ulu is the traditional skinning and everything camp blade of the Inuit (Eskimo) peoples...The Eastern feature a single stem while the Western favour a double stem but there is no better skinner, period!

This is a very good variation of it and an axe...I've only seen them at dealers or shows and never have owned one but I think they should handle both jobs quite adequately--the Uluchet© from P.J. Turner


An Ulu made by Bjarne Rasmussen


Caribou handled Eastern Ulu
 

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S.P.Q.R. You won't be disappointed with the Fiskars axe. I have a 28" axe and a 14" hatchet and have talked several friends into buying fiskars axes. They also make many gardening tools and I have a pair of 18" shears and a ten foot tree pruner. I have noticed low price Fiskars tools are made in China and stick with the Finland produced items. The warranty is also hassle free. After two years of use I broke my 28" axe while cutting my stuck chainsaw out of a large spruce tree. Took it back to the store I bought it from(with receipt) and got a new one. That was three years ago and the new axe has chopped down several trees and has split over 15 cords of firewood. I find it hard to get the blade stuck in a block of firewood. When I buy any gardening tools now I only buy Fiskars.
 

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Ever think of tactical tomahawk?
I purchased one as a tool/weapon and it rules.
Haven't had to test the weapon use aspect of it, but works great as tool.
Sturdy blade, composite handle. very nice. even came with carry case.
Lagana tactical tomahawk made by american tomahawk if you are interrested.
 

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Tactical are cool...I really like my Emerson CQC-T and the Vietnam copy that American makes called the LaGana is $130 and the CQC-T is $300 as is the Comanche and you're still talking only a 13¾" handle and those are the cheap version as most of the other tacticals start at $300--Pirela, Branton, D&L, Fehrman, Graham, Lairson, KS Tactical, Miracle Mountain, Nemesis, RMJ Forge, Szabonic, Wm. Courtney...

Big difference to a $40 hatchet...
 

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I have the Gerber Fiskars "Paxe". Super sharp, and works great.
I can honestly say that you’re the first person I’ve ever heard praise them that way!

You are referring to the 8.88” handled one, right? I had trouble making fuzz sticks (fire starters) with it and there just isn’t enough leverage or a heavy enough head to do most camp chores properly…Using it as a cleaver for meal prep, when breaking down a grouse or pheasant just barely works…

I’ve even tried to get my youngest daughter to try it and she did an then just went back to here Firestone…
 

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I can honestly say that you’re the first person I’ve ever heard praise them that way!

You are referring to the 8.88” handled one, right? I had trouble making fuzz sticks (fire starters) with it and there just isn’t enough leverage or a heavy enough head to do most camp chores properly…Using it as a cleaver for meal prep, when breaking down a grouse or pheasant just barely works…

I’ve even tried to get my youngest daughter to try it and she did an then just went back to here Firestone…
This is the key to that axe.
you're pretty much dead on, this axe wasn't designed to be primarily swung like a standard campaxe.
It CAN be to chop down smaller trees with some effort, but the handle was primarily intended as a handhold while you "hammer" on the flat back surface of the head.

A larger type fixed blade can also be an effective (ish) chopper/splitter by using this technique.

I have one of these in my smaller BOB, and again, it is OK, if you realize how it was intended be used and it's limitations.
 

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I can honestly say that you’re the first person I’ve ever heard praise them that way!

You are referring to the 8.88” handled one, right? I had trouble making fuzz sticks (fire starters) with it and there just isn’t enough leverage or a heavy enough head to do most camp chores properly…Using it as a cleaver for meal prep, when breaking down a grouse or pheasant just barely works…

I’ve even tried to get my youngest daughter to try it and she did an then just went back to here Firestone…
I won't be chopping down any large pine trees with it, but it worked real nice when I set up shelter with a single tarp and cut branches from trees.
 

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Anyone have the new Gerber Sport Axe II? I know this is an old thread but this is a fairly new model. Seems to be the perfect size to bring along for camping, hiking, and SHTF scenarios.



I am looking into it plus for $28 shipped on Amazon you cannot beat it!
 
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